Contributors

John Arnst

John Arnst
John Arnst walked away from the lab bench, then returned to it to process far-flung influenza samples and wound up promoting a flu vaccine campaign for K-12 schools in North Central Florida. At one point he smashed over 200 tomatoes in two hours for a project involving Salmonella, then couldn’t bear to eat any for more than a year. He graduated from the University of Florida in 2013 with degrees in English and biology and now writes about biochemistry, public health and the people who both sometimes fail.
 

Articles by John Arnst

Summer food science
Stroopwafels

Summer food science

7/2/2020
For those of you bound for a summertime holiday weekend, we dug into recent research on the yummy foods you might serve at a socially distant picnic.
How post-translational modifications affect the DNA sensor cGAS
Journal News

How PTMs affect the DNA sensor cGAS

6/18/2020
Researchers at Princeton led by Ileana Cristea have uncovered the role that post-translational modifications play in regulating the DNA sensor cGAS
On the front lines of coronavirus care
Profile

On the front lines of coronavirus care

6/12/2020
Recent months have been challenging, tiring and exciting for Mike Gillette, an ICU physician and Molecular & Cellular Proteomics associate editor.
How to catch and kill a coronavirus on a doorknob
News

How to catch and kill a coronavirus on a doorknob

5/27/2020
Researchers at Miami University are developing polymer coatings to inactivate SARS-CoV-2 on public surfaces.
A legacy of tyrosine
Feature

A legacy of tyrosine

5/11/2020
For Tony Hunter, the Salk Institute biochemist who discovered tyrosine phosphorylation and winner of a 2018 Tang Prize, the world outside the lab is as important as the work inside it.
Cow born in Japan after removal, replacement of placental cells
Journal News

Cow born in Japan after removal, replacement of placental cells

4/24/2020
A mouse embryo, with the same cells removed, was much less successful than the cow at regenerating a placenta, researchers at Hokkaido University noted.
Stopping the devil in the dust
Feature

Stopping the devil in the dust

4/7/2020
As clinicians, veterinarians and research scientists close in on potential vaccines for the devastating fungal illness Valley fever, the largest barrier likely remains outside the lab.
A small army of researchers races to build a coronavirus interactome
News

A small army of researchers races to build a coronavirus interactome

4/1/2020
Scientists at eight institutions in the U.S. and Europe have used a protein interaction map to identify 69 drugs that might work against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.
Multiomics meets antimalarials
Journal News

Multiomics meets antimalarials

3/31/2020
Researchers in Australia use an innovative multiomics approach to analyze a new drug against malaria parasites.
Science communication in action: COVID-19 edition
Science Communication

Science communication in action: COVID-19 edition

3/23/2020
Our science writers selected 10 examples of solid scicomm about the novel coronavirus.
Scrutinizing the greatest threat to pigs
Journal News

Scrutinizing the greatest threat to pigs

2/26/2020
Researchers in Spain resolve the complex membranes of African swine fever virus as the pathogen continues its slow burn across Southeast Asia.
 Could an old malaria drug help fight the new coronavirus?
News

Could an old malaria drug help fight the new coronavirus?

2/6/2020
As new cases of the novel coronavirus appear daily, researchers in China have found that two drugs, chloroquine and remdesivir, can inhibit its replication in cell culture.
Quantifying bacteria-borne bile that may cause metabolic disease
Journal News

Quantifying bacteria-borne bile that may cause metabolic disease

2/4/2020
Researchers have developed a new analytical method to puzzle out which bile acids in our guts are being produced by bacteria.
Holidays may break our resolve, but not our microbiomes
Wellness

Holidays may break our resolve, but not our microbiomes

1/10/2020
The connection between what we eat and which bacteria wind up dominating our gut is well established, but a few weeks of eating nonhabitual foods are unlikely to alter the composition of your gut bacteria significantly.
Serving societies and investigating viruses
Interview

Serving societies and investigating viruses

1/8/2020
RNA virus expert Craig Cameron, who long has worked to increase minority representation within professional societies, is now a Journal of Biological Chemistry associate editor.
National Influenza Vaccination Week
Health Observance

National Influenza Vaccination Week

12/2/2019
The year may be winding down, but flu season is still heating up.
From the journals: December 2019
Journal News

From the journals: December 2019

12/1/2019
Chasing the structure of a histone’s N-terminus tail. Highlighting the role of lipids in mediating endoplasmic reticulum structure. Defining the components of a bacteria’s biofilm matrix. Researchers tackle these tasks and more in our latest roundup…
Oxygen sensing and adapting to altitude
Feature

Oxygen sensing and adapting to altitude

12/1/2019
Gregg Semenza is one of three physician–scientists sharing the 2019 Nobel Prize in physiology and medicine for their discoveries related to the protein complex hypoxia-inducible factor and the red blood cell–producing hormone it controls.
Labeling lipids and playing piano
Award

Labeling lipids and playing piano

11/1/2019
Jeremy Baskin is the winner of the 2020 Walter Shaw Young Investigator Award in Lipids.
Giant gene thieves
Feature

Giant gene thieves

11/1/2019
From Siberian ice cores to Australian lake beds, John Arnst writes, massive viruses — only recently identified with the help of cryo-electron microscopy — are changing what we know about evolutionary biology and viral structure.
From the journals: November 2019
Journal News

From the journals: November 2019

11/1/2019
What is mitochondria’s role in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease? What’s the best way to differentiate embryonic and mesenchymal stem cells to use MSCs in therapy? How do fatty acids reduce melanin in tumor cells? Researchers tackle these questions …
Meet Qi-Qun Tang
Interview

Meet Qi-Qun Tang

10/1/2019
As the Journal of Biological Chemistry’s first associate editor in China, this adipocyte expert at Fudan University hopes to improve the quality of scientific papers coming from his native country.
Under the skin and out in the world
Feature

Under the skin and out in the world

10/1/2019
Before Rockefeller University professor and Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator Elaine Fuchs began her groundbreaking work studying skin-derived stem cells, she dreamed of teaching in the Peace Corps — and she still loves an adventure.
Closing in on a cure
Feature

Closing in on a cure

9/1/2019
With the rollout of exon-skipping drugs that cost $300,000 a year and researchers focused on delivering corrections using compacted genes and CRISPR–Cas9, what is the future of treating this most common form of muscular dystrophy.
Meet Mike Shipston
Interview

Meet Mike Shipston

8/1/2019
The UK-based electrophysiologist and associate editor for JBC interrogates the delicate permutations in ion channels that manifest on larger scales as endocrine disorders.
Personalized protocols
Feature

Personalized protocols

6/1/2019
Throwback Thursday for Mental Health Awareness Month: Mandated by law, mental health accommodations can help some students and researchers succeed in the lab — but first they have to ask.
Meet Karin Musier–Forsyth
Interview

Meet Karin Musier–Forsyth

5/1/2019
An associate editor of the Journal of Biological Chemistry since January 2018, Musier–Forsyth probes the editing mechanisms of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in her lab at Ohio State and uses ASBMB resources as teaching tools for graduate students.
Meet Phyllis Hanson
Interview

Meet Phyllis Hanson

3/1/2019
This Journal of Biological Chemistry associate editor spent two decades researching protein–protein and protein–membrane interactions involved in membrane trafficking at Washington University in St. Louis before her recent move.
From the journals: March 2019
Journal News

From the journals: March 2019

3/1/2019
What’s the lipid situation in bone cancer? How can a scorpion venom vanquish viruses? How does a protein block cell fusion in chemotherapy? These and other research questions are addressed in our roundup.
MCP: Wasp venom causes slow burn in roach brain
Journal News

MCP: Wasp venom causes slow burn in roach brain

2/1/2019
When researchers at the University of California, Riverside subjected an elusive venom to RNA sequencing and proteomic analysis, they found that its components include hundreds of identified neurotransmitter hormones and peptide precursors, they wri…
Making O
Feature

Making O

2/1/2019
After a 10-year decline in transfusions and donations, the goal of generating universal blood might be making a comeback.
Meet Saddiq Zahari
Interview

Meet Saddiq Zahari

12/1/2018
The editor of manuscript integrity for the journal Molecular & Cellular Proteomics ensures that every published paper complies with essential guidelines for data analysis, clinical and targeted proteomics, and glycomics.
Meet Karen Fleming
Interview

Meet Karen Fleming

11/1/2018
This associate editor at the Journal of Biological Chemistry examines the energetics of transmembrane proteins in her lab at Johns Hopkins University, where she also convenes workshops on gender bias and works to educate young women about successful…
The future of fighting flu
Feature

The future of fighting flu

11/1/2018
Researchers around the world are working to improve existing vaccines, increase vaccination rates in critical population groups and develop universal, long-term protection.
Shadow gene makes sea mammals vulnerable
News

Shadow gene makes sea mammals vulnerable

10/1/2018
University of Washington researchers study why, after certain species moved from land to sea eons ago, their descendants lost the function of an enzyme that can break down a neurotoxin in the pesticide chlorpyrifos.
Steitz wins Lasker lifetime achievement award
Member News

Steitz wins Lasker lifetime achievement award

9/1/2018
Joan Steitz honored by the Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation.
From the journals: August 2018
Journal News

From the journals: August 2018

8/1/2018
Why are people with chronic kidney disease at high risk of heart failure? Can a pathogen avoid a host antibody by grabbing it? Why do some cancer cells love sugar and eschew fiber? Read about these topics and more in our roundup.
Jerry Hart changes residency, assumes presidency
Profile

Jerry Hart changes residency, assumes presidency

8/1/2018
After spending most of the past four decades breaking scientific ground at Johns Hopkins University, the new ASBMB president is taking his glycobiology lab to the University of Georgia.
Machining for science
Feature

Machining for science

6/1/2018
As biomedical research evolves, engineers and machinists at the National Institutes of Health strive daily to create lab equipment for investigators with unconventional demands.
The gut-brain connection
Feature

The gut-brain connection

5/1/2018
The various symptoms of Parkinson’s all stem from the aggregation of a misfolded protein, alpha-synuclein, and new research focuses on disrupting this process by figuring out how a bug lurking in the gut microbiome affects the brain.
Meet Christopher Whitfield
Interview

Meet Christopher Whitfield

5/1/2018
Christopher Whitfield, a new associate editor at the Journal of Biological Chemistry, discusses how he interrogates bacterial polysaccharides and sustains football fandom.
From a Bavarian baccalaureate to bacterial bleach
Interview

From a Bavarian baccalaureate to bacterial bleach

3/1/2018
At the University of Michigan, Ursula Jakob’s lab is investigating how to make the bacteria bent on colonizing your gut more sensitive to the bleach, or hypochlorous acid, that your white blood cells deploy against them.
MCP: When mitochondria make B cells go bad
Journal News

MCP: When mitochondria make B cells go bad

2/1/2018
A proteomics analysis of cells that are prone to becoming cancer cells, described in Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, reveals clear signatures of mitochondrial and metabolic stress.
Addressing the tangled roots of health disparities
Feature

Addressing the tangled roots of health disparities

2/1/2018
Life scientists forge collaborations to rethink old questions, train young researchers and engage diverse communities.
A battered island rises
Feature

A battered island rises

1/1/2018
Hurricane Maria damaged labs and destroyed equipment; John Arnst talked to scientists in Puerto Rico about how they support each other and persevere.
Membrane maestro George Carman returns to the JLR
Interview

Membrane maestro George Carman returns to the JLR

1/1/2018
A veteran associate editor describes how he made the journey from the mean streets of Jersey City to a lab studying the biosynthesis of membrane phospholipids.
MCP: Ovarian cancer’s dark signaling pathways
Journal News

MCP: Ovarian cancer’s dark signaling pathways

1/1/2018
Researchers write in a paper in Molecular & Cellular Proteomics about using proteotranscriptomic techniques to uncover associations between factors expressed by high-grade serous ovarian adenocarcinoma and the likelihood of patient survival.
MCP: How exercise works its biomolecular wonders
Journal News

MCP: How exercise works its biomolecular wonders

12/1/2017
The levels of circulating peptides and hormones are modulated rapidly during and after exercise through a network of post-translational modifications and proteases, researchers write in Molecular & Cellular Proteomics.
The circadian coupling of cellular and solar clocks
Feature

The circadian coupling of cellular and solar clocks

12/1/2017
Three American scientists won a 2017 Nobel Prize for discovering the mechanisms that affect myriad aspects of physiology by making our cellular clocks tick in time with the Earth’s revolutions.
MCP: We shall know thine enemy, honey bee
Journal News

MCP: We shall know thine enemy, honey bee

11/1/2017
A protein atlas published in Molecular & Cellular Proteomics details 1,433 differentially expressed proteins across the developmental stages of a parasitic mite that has wreaked havoc on bee colonies across North America.
Mouse lemurs — a model in the wild
Feature

Mouse lemurs — a model in the wild

11/1/2017
The petite primates found in Madagascar’s rainforests are changing our understanding of human disease and the African nation’s scientific education programs.
Young wins Nobel Prize in medicine or physiology
Member News

Michael W. Young wins Nobel in medicine or physiology

11/1/2017
Michael W. Young at the Rockefeller University and Michael Rosbash and Jeffrey C. Hall at Brandeis University have won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling circadian rhythm.
The cyanides of Titan
News

The cyanides of Titan

10/1/2017
A nitrogenous compound in the atmosphere of Saturn’s moon Titan might have the potential to form membranelike spheres.
Acquiring new skills and growing networks
Feature

Acquiring new skills and growing networks

10/1/2017
PROLAB travel awards help emerging scientists from overseas gain experience in labs in the U.S. and Canada.
Meet Russell DeBose–Boyd
Interview

Meet Russell DeBose–Boyd

9/1/2017
This new associate editor at the Journal of Lipid Research is passionate about the body’s synthesis of cholesterol. He also likes to make spaghetti from scratch.
MCP: Worms, too, slow down in old age
Journal News

MCP: Worms, too, slow down in old age

9/1/2017
A paper in Molecular & Cellular Proteomics describes how roundworms reduce their rate of recycling certain proteins, thus stymying effort to dodge mortality.
MCP: How radiotherapies vanquish cancer cells
Journal News

MCP: How radiotherapies vanquish cancer cells

8/1/2017
A paper in Molecular & Cellular Proteomics describes efforts to understand the regulatory effects of particle beams on the structure and signaling pathways of cancerous cells.
A scientist who seeks stories and speaks her mind
Profile

A scientist who seeks stories and speaks her mind

8/1/2017
After publishing op-eds about under-discussed issues facing scientists, Tricia Serio started a project to document the effects of sexism in academia.
Meet Joseph Jez
Interview

Meet Joseph Jez

6/1/2017
The new associate editor at the Journal of Biological Chemistry has ricocheted across the country pursuing new avenues for crystallography.
The science behind kratom’s strange leaves
Feature

The science behind kratom’s strange leaves

6/1/2017
Long used as a painkiller overseas, the plant has gained in popularity among American opioid addicts trying to get clean. Meanwhile, researchers are making headway as U.S. regulators consider cracking down.
Meet Wolfgang Peti
Interview

Meet Wolfgang Peti

6/1/2017
The associate editor at the Journal of Biological Chemistry has a deep appreciation for NMR spectroscopy.
Meet Ronald Wek
Interview

Meet Ronald Wek

6/1/2017
This new associate editor at the Journal of Biological Chemistry investigates the roles of RNA in stress response pathways and disease states.
Branches bursting with secrets
Feature

Branches bursting with secrets

6/1/2017
Kratom leaves contain a panoply of unidentified compounds
Meet Thomas Neubert
Interview

Meet Thomas Neubert

5/1/2017
The associate editor for the journal Molecular & Cellular Proteomics has his fingers in many signaling pies.
Meet Pierre Thibault
Interview

Meet Pierre Thibault

5/1/2017
The associate editor for the journal Molecular & Cellular Proteomics discovered mass spectrometry’s power while tracking a deadly toxin.
MCP: Tracing damage pathways in diabetic kidney disease
Journal News

MCP: Tracing damage pathways in diabetic kidney disease

4/1/2017
Researchers found a link between proteomic changes caused by male sex hormones and impaired metabolism.
The slime and grime that stick to ships
Feature

The slime and grime that stick to ships

4/1/2017
Marine organisms hitchhike on ships at great cost to maritime industries. How can researchers thwart them?
MCP: Predicting when blood goes bad
Journal News

MCP: Predicting when blood goes bad

3/1/2017
Researchers generated a model based on five key metabolic factors for predicting how long blood can be stored.
Meet Anne-Claude Gingras
Interview

Meet Anne-Claude Gingras

3/1/2017
One of the two new deputy editors for Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, she is a signaling expert from Québéc.
Meet Steve Carr
Interview

Meet Steve Carr

3/1/2017
One of the two new deputy editors for Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, he credits his parents for his education.
Sharing the whole HeLa genome
Feature

Sharing the whole HeLa genome

2/1/2017
An agreement between the Lacks family and the National Institutes of Health is benefiting researchers.
MCP: Scott syndrome and the smallest sample size
Journal News

MCP: Scott syndrome and the smallest sample size

2/1/2017
One patient gives researchers an idea of what happens in a rare blood disorder.
MCP: How now, chilled cow?
Journal News

MCP: How now, chilled cow?

1/1/2017
Researchers explore how beef processing may be improved to reduce cases of food poisoning.
Burning fat and balancing liver lipids
Interview

Burning fat and balancing liver lipids

1/1/2017
An interview with Michael Wolfgang of the Johns Hopkins University.
The odyssey of autophagy
Feature

The odyssey of autophagy

12/1/2016
By discovering the mechanisms of autophagy, Yoshinori Ohsumi pushed a neglected field into the limelight.
MCP: The lives of plant-dwelling bacteria
Journal News

MCP: The lives of plant-dwelling bacteria

12/1/2016
A set of proteins found in two different bacteria suggest common mechanisms for successful leaf colonization.
The trouble with the testosterone test
Feature

The trouble with the testosterone test

11/1/2016
Using a 'baseline' level of testosterone becomes problematic when women compete in track and field events.
JBC: Blocking potato blight’s ability to set up shop
Journal News

JBC: Blocking potato blight’s ability to set up shop

11/1/2016
Researchers better understand how plants succumb to the pathogen.
MCP: Infant gut microbes’ thirst for milk glycoproteins
Journal News

MCP: Infant gut microbes’ thirst for milk glycoproteins

11/1/2016
Researchers report that the bacteria in infants’ guts are capable of digesting breast milk glycoproteins.