Some ivory towers are ideal for a pandemic. Most aren’t.
News

Some ivory towers are ideal for a pandemic. Most aren’t.

By Mark Kreidler
As reopening decisions approach for the fall semester, colleges and universities are casting about for strategies to keep students safe without bankrupting their institutions. A few have natural advantages.
Stroopwafels

This week's staff picks

This week, our minds are very much on the national wave of protests against police killings of black civilians and racial injustice.
This week's staff picks

News and Ideas

2020 voter guide
Member News

2020 voter guide

June 05, 2020

Learn about the positions and candidates running for the ASBMB Council, Nominating Committee and Publications Committee.

The COVID-19 pandemic is squeezing women out of science
Essay

The COVID-19 pandemic is squeezing women out of science

June 05, 2020

Marina Holz, a dean and professor at New York Medical College, observes that increased home and childcare responsibilities are largely falling on the shoulders of women — to the detriment of their scientific work.

We are all connected: exploring environmental science careers
Jobs

We are all connected: exploring environmental science careers

June 05, 2020

Take a step in your backyard and explore nature's free museum. Then ask yourself: Might an environmental science career be right for you?

Jerry B. Lingrel (1935 – 2020)
Retrospective

Jerry B. Lingrel (1935 – 2020)

June 04, 2020

Friends and colleagues remember a longtime Journal of Biological Chemistry associate editor, professor at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and pioneer in the field of molecular biology.

No, we will not be silent
President's Message

No, we will not be silent

June 03, 2020

The ASBMB president writes in support of the Minority Affairs Committee’s statement on police killings of black people and systemic racism.

Pivoting from carnivorous plants to COVID-19
News

Pivoting from carnivorous plants to COVID-19

June 03, 2020

UCI professor Rachel Martin leads a consortium, including most of her department, in a hunt for protease-inhibiting antivirals.

When relations with China worsen, science suffers
Blotter

When relations with China worsen, science suffers

June 03, 2020

Legislation introduced in Congress and a presidential proclamation aim to restrict student and research visas for Chinese graduate students.

More than skin-deep
Journal News

More than skin-deep

June 02, 2020

Researchers in Korea have found a novel bacterial lipase structure that may lead to new treatments for acne.

'We will not be silent'
Diversity

'We will not be silent'

June 01, 2020

Members of the ASBMB Minority Affairs Committee release a statement about police killings of black people and institutionalized racism.

Meet Our Contributors

Martina G. Efeyini
Martina G. Efeyini
Alyson Smith
Alyson Smith
Bill Sullivan
Bill Sullivan
Sarina Neote
Sarina Neote
Science inreach: why building connections as scientists matters
Martina G. Efeyini

Careers Columnist

Our careers columnist talked with Lou Woodley, director of the Center for Scientific Collaboration and Community Engagement, to learn what it takes to be a scientific community engagement manager. Read More

Ants in the lab

Take a peek inside the labs of Danny Reinberg and Shelley Berger, who use ants to study the role of epigenetics and gene expression in behavior and aging. Read More

How to write a killer cover letter for a postdoctoral application
Bill Sullivan

Showalter Professor of Pharmacology & Toxicology

Many graduate students applying for their first postdoctoral positions underestimate the importance of the cover letter. While it may be true that your awesomeness is beautifully outlined on your curriculum vitae, your cover letter often will dictate whether the busy principal investigator puts your application at the top of the heaping pile or into triage. First impressions are everything for some people, so leave nothing to chance. If you provide only your CV, you aren’t being very personable, and you lose a precious opportunity to highlight some things that make you stand out. On the other hand, a cover letter is also an opportunity to shoot yourself in the foot, so here are a few do’s and don’ts. Read More

Federal agencies struggle to address sexual harassment in STEM research
Sarina Neote

Science Policy Manager

A Q&A with John Neumann of the General Accountability Office, whose team produced a report in March on federal funding agencies’ dealings with sexual harassment. Read More

Join the ASBMB Today mailing list

Sign up to get updates on articles, interviews and events.