Science

Journal News
Laurel Oldach
October 29, 2020
Australian researchers uncover the forgotten history of a peptide from rainforest trees that is synthesized by an enzyme that acts like a slightly confused protease.
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The blueprint for life, neatly folded
News

The blueprint for life, neatly folded

October 18, 2020

Bit by bit, biologists are deciphering the complex 3-D — and 4-D — architecture of the genome and learning how all the squeezed-together stuff of DNA keeps itself in order. What they find could lead to medical advances.

How safe is the DNA in your poop from unwanted snooping
News

How safe is the DNA in your poop from unwanted snooping

October 17, 2020

Sewer systems can signal outbreaks of disease before they start. If you’re worried, poop is safe as long as it’s in the right hands

From the journals: MCP
Journal News

From the journals: MCP

October 16, 2020

Immune signaling in early-stage COVID-19, regulating translation on the ER membrane and reversing asparagine hydroxylation. Read about papers on these topics recently published in Molecular & Cellular Proteomics.

Nobelists’ former postdocs discover missing link in telomerase evolution
Member News

Nobelists’ former postdocs discover missing link in telomerase evolution

October 13, 2020

The cell-aging enzyme’s RNA is an intermediate between that of humans and lower eukaryotes, containing signature marks from both kingdoms.

Cellular signposts
Member News

Cellular signposts

October 11, 2020

By mapping a trail of chemical reactions, Howard Hughes investigator Squire Booker shows how one group of enzymes helps us stay healthy.

Milk through the millennia
Feature

Milk through the millennia

October 08, 2020

Anthropologists and analytical chemists have used lipid residues on 5,000-year-old pottery to pin down the earliest direct chemical evidence for milk consumption in eastern Africa.

Journal News

Plasma membrane is no barrier to free fatty acid

A recent paper describes how fatty acids spontaneously diffuse through protein-free lipid bilayers and the plasma membranes of cells.
Plasma membrane is no barrier to free fatty acid

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Charpentier and Doudna win chemistry Nobel
Award

Charpentier and Doudna win chemistry Nobel

October 07, 2020

They determined the mechanism of RNA-guided bacterial adaptive immunity by the CRISPR–Cas9 system, enabling them to harness the system for efficient genome engineering in animals and plants.

Rice shares Nobel for hepatitis C discoveries
Member News

Rice shares Nobel for hepatitis C discoveries

October 05, 2020

Charles M. Rice of The Rockefeller University, along with co-laureates Harvey J. Alter and Michael Houghton, made seminal discoveries that led to the identification of the hepatitis C virus.

SARS-CoV-2 infection can block pain, opening up unexpected new possibilities for research into pain relief medication
News

SARS-CoV-2 infection can block pain, opening up unexpected new possibilities for research into pain relief medication

October 04, 2020

Most accounts to date have focused on how the virus invades cells via the ACE2 protein on the surface of many cells. But recent studies suggest there is another route that enables it to infect the nervous system.

Viruses that come to stay
News

Viruses that come to stay

October 03, 2020

Some linger in the body for a lifetime. The one causing Covid-19 probably isn’t one of them, but it and others can create mischief long after the immune system appears to have banished them.

Older people like President Trump are at more risk from COVID-19 because of how the immune system ages
News

Older people like President Trump are at more risk from COVID-19 because of how the immune system ages

October 02, 2020

Through the end of September, 79% of COVID-19 deaths in the U.S. were in patients over 65. Monocytes from older individuals produce less interferon in response to viral infections.

Pandemic snarls research administration
Funding

Pandemic snarls research administration

October 01, 2020

With data collection slowed and grant applications way up, the pandemic is disrupting the complex, slow-moving NIH funding system. Federal officials and university grant administrators are working to help researchers keep things moving.

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