Science

Journal News
Laurel Oldach
January 22, 2020
Do sperm offer the uterus a secret handshake?
Why does it take 200 million sperm to fertilize a single egg? A female immune response is one reason. A molecular handshake may help sperm survive the bombardment.
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Folic Acid Awareness Week
Health Observance

Folic Acid Awareness Week

January 11, 2020

The National Birth Defects Prevention Network and related organizations observed Folic Acid Awareness Week this week to educate the public, in particular mothers-to-be, about the role that folic acid plays in preventing congenital disabilities.

How to catch an HIF
Journal News

How to catch an HIF

January 10, 2020

The 1995 discovery of hypoxia-inducible factor by the lab of Gregg Semenza was a major milestone in figuring out how cells sense oxygen.

Holidays may break our resolve, but not our microbiomes
Wellness

Holidays may break our resolve, but not our microbiomes

January 10, 2020

The connection between what we eat and which bacteria wind up dominating our gut is well established, but a few weeks of eating nonhabitual foods are unlikely to alter the composition of your gut bacteria significantly.

Flipping lipids to deform membranes
Lipid News

Flipping lipids to deform membranes

January 07, 2020

The plasma membrane changes shape during cell migration, cancer cell invasion, cell division, nutrient uptake and entry of pathogens into cells. Lipid-flipping activity may be involved in any or all of these processes.

From the journals: JBC
Journal News

From the journals: JBC

January 03, 2020

Articles in the Journal of Biological Chemistry investigate immune receptor binding; barrel-shaped organelles called vaults; de novo dNTP synthesis; and a specific SNARE inhibitor.

From the journals: MCP
Journal News

From the journals: MCP

January 03, 2020

Articles in the journal Molecular & Cellular Proteomics report peptide signatures for ID'g bacteria. the first evidence of phosphorylation in Francisella tularensis, how pathogenic phleboviruses bud and exit host cells, and more.

Lipid News

A new hotspot for cyclooxygenase inhibition

Drugs like aspirin dampen inflammation by inhibiting certain enzymes, but can have nasty gastrointestinal side effects so enzymologists are investigating the structure of the enzymes’ active sites in hopes of designing more selective inhibitors.
A new hotspot for cyclooxygenase inhibition

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Crystal building blocks of triglycerides
Lipid News

Crystal building blocks of triglycerides

December 01, 2019

Using methods that include crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, recent work in three labs has defined structures and mechanisms in triglycerides, Michael Airola writes.

Rounding out the year with nickel and zinc
A Year of (Bio)chemical Elements

Rounding out the year
with nickel and zinc

December 01, 2019

Quira Zeidan ends her yearlong series marking the 150th anniversary of Dmitri Mendeleev’s periodic table with a look at the two metallic elements with chemical symbols Ni and Zn.

JBC: Tor comes to the fore in autophagy
Journal News

JBC: Tor comes to the fore
in autophagy

December 01, 2019

Yoshinori Ohsumi, Takeshi Noda and colleagues at the National Institute for Basic Biology in Japan discovered that the Tor protein controls the breakdown process of autophagy in yeast cells. Martin Spiering writes about their classic paper.

JBC: Paving the way for disease-resistant rice
Journal News

JBC: Paving the way
for disease-resistant rice

December 01, 2019

Scientists have found that a rice immune receptor triggers reactions in response to fungal proteins, a first step toward using gene editing to prevent the crop destruction caused by rice blast disease.

JLR: Secrets of fat and the lymph node
Journal News

JLR: Secrets of fat
and the lymph node

December 01, 2019

Some 20 years ago, Sander Kersten isolated a protein that acts as a control for how our bodies store or burn fat. Recently, he wrote in the Journal of Lipid Research about why loss of this protein can be fatal to mice.

MCP: When prions are personal
Journal News

MCP: When prions are personal

December 01, 2019

In a quest to cure the deadly protein folding disease that runs in his wife’s family, a researcher publishes a new assay for monitoring protein levels in the journal Molecular & Cellular Proteomics.

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