Contributors

Ankita Arora

Ankita Arora
Ankita Arora is a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. In her current project, she is trying to decipher rules that govern RNA transport in brain cells. She earned her master’s degree in biotechnology from the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, then moved to Germany to pursue a Ph.D. in biology at the Ruprecht Karl University of Heidelberg. Her thesis focused on developing new methods to image RNA in live cells. She is also a science policy enthusiast and an active member of the National Science Policy Network — a community led by early-career researchers that focuses on empowering ECRs to increase the role of science in society. Outside of science, she likes to read fiction, travel (she is a national parks geek), and try out various cuisines from all over the world (barring meat, as she is a vegetarian). She is also an avid hiker. 

Articles by Ankita Arora

From the journals: MCP
Journal News

From the journals: MCP

April 22, 2022
Uncovering a rare disease’s brain proteome. Standardizing immunopeptidome data sets. Analyzing Matrigel for organoids. Read about recent papers on these topics.
Researchers find a cell surface decorated with sugar-coated RNAs
News

Researchers find a cell surface decorated with sugar-coated RNAs

Aug. 1, 2021
Finding not just glycoproteins and glycolipids but also glycoRNA means “now there are three hands, and we don’t know what that third hand is doing.”
Eternal memories and an overdue tribute — storing digital data in DNA
Art

Eternal memories and an overdue tribute — storing digital data in DNA

April 21, 2021
Researchers crowdsourced 10,000 images, stored them on synthetic DNA and then used them to create a portrait of Rosalind Franklin, an often overlooked star of DNA discovery.
Scientists unmask a virus that mimicked human RNA and hit on a potential vaccine
News

Scientists unmask a virus that mimicked human RNA and hit on a potential vaccine

April 18, 2021
Human metapneumovirus is a molecular mimic, sneaking past immune systems to cause cold symptoms
Progeria: From the unknown to the first FDA-approved treatment
Health Observance

Progeria: From the unknown to the first FDA-approved treatment

Feb. 25, 2021
Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome is a rare, fatal genetic disease that causes premature aging.