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By the numbers: Career prospects in the life sciences

Laurel Oldach Lisa Schnabel Allison Frick
By Laurel Oldach, Lisa Schnabel and Allison Frick
Aug. 1, 2019

Ph.D. outcomes by the numbers:
Career prospects in the life sciences

Ph.D. outcomes by the numbers:
Career prospects in the life sciences

 

The first step after graduate school

The National Science Foundation administers the Survey of Earned Doctorates to degree recipients before they leave their universities. One line of inquiry in the survey is about post-graduation plans for employment. Among about 12,500 graduates in the life sciences in 2017, many had not made a definite commitment by the time they took the survey. Others had accepted job or postdoc offers. Here’s where.

Graduation cap chart

 
 

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Laurel Oldach

Laurel Oldach is a former science writer for the ASBMB.

Lisa Schnabel
Lisa Schnabel

Lisa Schnabel is the senior graphic designer at the ASBMB.

Allison Frick

Allison Frick is the ASBMB’s multimedia and social media content manager.

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