Contributors

Quira Zeidan

Quira Zeidan
Quira Zeidan is ASBMB's education and public outreach coordinator. She earned her B.S. in biology at the Universidad Central de Venezuela and her Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, where her thesis work focused on the role of glycosylation in ribosome function. After completing her postdoctoral fellowship at the National Institutes of Health, working in the area of translational regulation, she joined the Ana G. Mendez University, Capital Area Campus, in Silver Spring, Maryland, as an adjunct faculty member. She continues to teach evening and weekend classes in the nursing program at this dual-language minority-serving institution while also serving in her current position at the ASBMB. Zeidan coordinates the education and outreach efforts of the ASBMB by supporting the accreditation and the certification exam program, the Art of Science Communication course, and the student chapter outreach grant, among other society endeavors.  

Articles by Quira Zeidan

Rounding out the year with nickel and zinc
A Year of (Bio)chemical Elements

Rounding out the year with nickel and zinc

12/1/2019
Quira Zeidan ends her yearlong series marking the 150th anniversary of Dmitri Mendeleev’s periodic table with a look at the two metallic elements with chemical symbols Ni and Zn.
For November, it’s that smell of sulfur
A Year of (Bio)chemical Elements

For November, it’s that smell of sulfur

11/1/2019
This month we focus on sulfur, a reactive nonmetallic element created inside massive stars as the product of nuclear fusion between silicon and helium.
For October, magnesium helps the leaves stay green
A Year of (Bio)chemical Elements

For October, magnesium helps the leaves stay green

10/1/2019
This month, we focus in magnesium, with symbol Mg and atomic number 12, a reactive alkaline earth metal that is the ninth most abundant element in the known universe.
Manganese seldom travels alone
A Year of (Bio)chemical Elements

Manganese seldom travels alone

9/1/2019
This month, we focus on an element frequently found in silicate, carbonate and oxide minerals, and in alloys with iron.
Breathe deep — for August, it’s oxygen
A Year of (Bio)chemical Elements

Breathe deep — for August, it’s oxygen

8/1/2019
This month, we focus on oxygen, a highly reactive nonmetal and the third most abundant chemical element in the known universe.
For June and July, it’s atomic Nos. 6 and 7
A Year of (Bio)chemical Elements

For June and July, it’s atomic Nos. 6 and 7

6/1/2019
This month, we focus on carbon, with atomic No. 6, and nitrogen, with atomic No. 7, two abundant reactive nonmetals that share electrons with other atoms by forming several covalent bonds.
For May, it’s in your bones: calcium and phosphorus
A Year of (Bio)chemical Elements

For May, it’s in your bones: calcium and phosphorus

5/1/2019
May is arthritis awareness month, so Quira Zeidan focuses on the elements calcium and phosphorus, the two components of the mineral salt hydroxyapatite, which makes up about 65 percent of human adult bone mass.
For April, it’s copper — atomic No. 29
A Year of (Bio)chemical Elements

For April, it’s copper — atomic No. 29

4/1/2019
In the fourth month of the International Year of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements, we focus on copper, atomic No. 29, the third most abundant metallic element in biological systems.
For March, it’s a renal three-fer: sodium, potassium and chlorine
A Year of (Bio)chemical Elements

For March, it’s a renal three-fer: sodium, potassium and chlorine

3/1/2019
Quira Zeidan marks National Kidney Month and the third month of the International Year of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements with a focus on three elements central to renal function: sodium, potassium and chlorine.
For February, it’s iron — atomic No. 26
A Year of (Bio)chemical Elements

For February, it’s iron — atomic No. 26

2/1/2019
To mark the second month of the International Year of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements, Quira Zeidan writes about iron, the most abundant element on earth.
For January, it’s atomic No. 1
A Year of (Bio)chemical Elements

For January, it’s atomic No. 1

1/1/2019
We celebrate the International Year of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements (the 150th anniversary of the first publication of Russian chemist Dmitri Mendeleev’s periodic table) by highlighting an element each month in 2019.
A straight and twisting career path
Essay

A straight and twisting career path

8/1/2018
Quira Zeidan never wavered in her straight-line path to a postdoc, but she made time for the teaching and outreach that fed her need for human interaction.