News

Coronavirus evolving: How mutations arise and new variants emerge

As it spreads throughout the world, the virus that causes Covid-19 has been changing. Scientists are tracking those changes, hoping to stay one step ahead of worrisome strains.
Diana Kwon Maki Naro
By Diana Kwon and Maki Naro
March 7, 2021

Illustrated by Maki Naro

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This piece was produced in cooperation with the Nib

This article originally appeared in Knowable Magazine, an independent journalistic endeavor from Annual Reviews.

Diana Kwon
Diana Kwon

Diana Kwon is a freelance science journalist based in Berlin, Germany. She primarily covers the life sciences and health, and her work has appeared in Scientific American, The Scientist, Nature, Knowable Magazine and many other publications.

Maki Naro
Maki Naro

Maki Naro  is an award-winning feral cartoonist and science communicator.

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