Blotter

Bill would reform NSF and plant innovation hubs nationwide

The Endless Frontier Act would rename and add a directorate to the agency. It also would fix the uneven distribution of jobs and capital concentrated now in just a few cities.
Sarina Neote
June 17, 2020

The Endless Frontier Act, introduced in both the House and the Senate at the end of May, would transform the United States' national strategy for investing in science and technology. It also would fix the uneven distribution of innovation jobs across the country, which has concentrated investment and resulting wealth in a handful of cities.

On May 28, Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., Sen. Todd Young, R-Ind., Rep. Ro Khanna, D-Calif., and Rep. Mike Gallagher, R-Wisc., unveiled the bipartisan, bicameral Endless Frontier Act to reform (and rename) the National Science Foundation, establish a regional technology hub program, and require a strategy and report on economic security, science, research and innovation. This legislation also would authorize Congress to pump up to $100 billion into the agency over five years if it so chooses.

The bill emphasizes that the federal government must address the uneven geographical distribution of innovation jobs, saying: “More than 90 percent of the nation’s innovation sector employment growth in the last 15 years was generated in just 5 major cities.”

According to a report in December by the Brookings Institution, those five major cities — Boston, San Francisco, San Jose, Seattle and San Diego — are well established as innovation hubs and continue to attract skilled workers and capital at the expense of other regions of the country.

The act would establish, with $10 billion from the Department of Commerce, 10 to 15 regional hubs that would serve as large-scale, platform labs for innovation. This would change the job market for many Americans, redistribute skilled workers and spread the positive economic impact of innovation.

If the legislation becomes law, the NSF would be renamed the National Science and Technology Foundation, and the agency, whose mission has historically been to invest in curiosity-driven research, would gain a new technology directorate headed by its own deputy director. Though the National Science Board would continue to provide oversight for the agency, the new technology directorate would have its own board appointed by Congress.

If passed, the act would distribute innovation capacity across the country and focus on new lines of funding and program development for science education to push the U.S.’s innovation sector forward.

Sarina Neote

Sarina Neote is ASBMB's science policy manager.

Join the ASBMB Today mailing list

Sign up to get updates on articles, interviews and events.

Latest in Policy

Policy highlights or most popular articles

Two years of the DOJ’s China Initiative
Blotter

Two years of the DOJ’s China Initiative

April 14, 2021

Despite the agency’s intense scrutiny of scientists at academic institutions, few have been convicted, and none has been accused of economic espionage.

Early-career scientists need pandemic relief funds
Blotter

Early-career scientists need pandemic relief funds

March 3, 2021

ASBMB recommends that Congress provide an additional year of funding for students and early-career researchers whose grants expired in 2020 before they could complete their training and/or research.

Can urban universities be better neighbors?
Feature

Can urban universities be better neighbors?

Feb. 10, 2021

Universities are a significant economic force in American cities. Some leaders are asking how they can use that power to benefit local communities.

5 ways the Biden administration may help stem the loss of international students
Education

5 ways the Biden administration may help stem the loss of international students

Feb. 10, 2021

Over the past four years, the Trump administration made it increasingly difficult for students from other countries to study in the United States. President Joe Biden’s election signals a new day for international education.

Intense scrutiny of Chinese-born researchers in the US threatens innovation
News

Intense scrutiny of Chinese-born researchers in the US threatens innovation

Jan. 30, 2021

The recent arrest of an MIT engineering professor has once again drawn attention to the role of China in the U.S. science and technology system.

Pandemic threatens food security for many college students
News

Pandemic threatens food security for many college students

Jan. 17, 2021

One spring 2020 report found that 38% of students at four-year universities were food-insecure in the previous 30 days.