Contributors

Kian Kamgar-Parsi

Kian Kamgar-Parsi
Kian Kamgar–Parsi started out as a physicist at the University of Virginia, where he wrote his bachelor's thesis on theoretical quantum entanglement. During his Ph.D. at the University of Michigan, he moved on to something completely different: studying protein-folding biophysics and amyloid proteins. He wrote his doctoral thesis on the molecular-level environmental factors influencing amyloid aggregation of human calcitonin, discovering a novel mechanism of aggregation. Since graduating in 2018, he has worked as a consultant with Lifescience Dynamics, providing strategic support to major pharmaceutical companies in the U.S. and abroad.

Articles by Kian Kamgar-Parsi

Re-creating coagulation in a lab
Journal News

Re-creating coagulation in a lab

9/15/2020
Threatened arthropods are in the crossfire of medical and conservation efforts, but new research could benefit horseshoe crabs and humans alike.
From the journals: JLR
Journal News

From the journals: JLR

4/21/2020
How lipid rafts are formed, how good cholesterol goes bad and the role of a new drug in cholesterol trafficking. Read about papers on these topics recently published in the Journal of Lipid Research.
From the journals: December 2019
Journal News

From the journals: December 2019

12/1/2019
Chasing the structure of a histone’s N-terminus tail. Highlighting the role of lipids in mediating endoplasmic reticulum structure. Defining the components of a bacteria’s biofilm matrix. Researchers tackle these tasks and more in our latest roundup…
From the journals: September 2019
Journal News

From the journals: September 2019

9/1/2019
A protein that could bring us closer to fertilizer-free farming. A link between cholesterol efflux in cerebral spinal fluid and Alzheimer’s. A protein that causes prostate tumor cells to thrive. Read these research highlights and more.
Circulating oxysterol levels
News

Circulating oxysterol levels

5/1/2019
Oxygenated metabolites of choles­terol play important roles in mediating cholesterol and lipid metabolism. By measuring the blood levels of these oxysterols in breast cancer pa­tients before and after tumor removal, F. Peter Guengerich and colleague…