Hobbies

From project to runway

Andrea Hadjikyriacou
March 1, 2015

As a female scientist who loves to shop while working many hours in the lab, I started a fashion blog in August 2012 called “PhDFashionista” to show others that being a scientist doesn’t mean you have to be boring!

There’s a certain stigma that being in science means you are a nerd or awkward, and I am trying to break those expectations by showing that you can still have a great sense of style while being successful and working hard in research. I also find practical outfits to wear to work while still looking fashionable and obeying the rules of the University of California, Los Angeles, for lab-acceptable clothing.

One of the many outfits that Andrea Hadjikyriacou wears to the lab. Find details about the clothes at www.phdfashionista.com.

On my blog, I post not only outfit details but also beauty and makeup tutorials, looks, inspiration for various holiday outfits, and more! I love to shop, and this gives me an outlet to post about what I enjoy doing in my free time, when I am not in the lab, and also has helped me build a community with other fashion bloggers who aren’t necessarily in science but with whom I have something in common.

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Andrea Hadjikyriacou

Andrea Hadjikyriacou is a postdoctoral scholar in industry/biotech by day and a fashion blogger at PhD Fashionista by night. She started her blog in graduate school to show the world that scientists can be stylish too.

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