Hobbies

ACDC: What’s in the name?

Eleftherios P. Diamandis
Aug. 1, 2015

Having a distinct name like Eleftherios gives you a lot of advantages. People never ask you to spell your name, and they remember it without much trouble.

Ha! If only!

Eleftherios Diamandis and graduate students from the ACDC lab in tribute mode

When I make restaurant reservations, I simplify things by going with the name Elvis. Nobody has ever asked me to spell it, and I get a smile in return. When people ask me for the name of my research laboratory, I reply, “the ACDC lab.”

The usual response is, “I’ve heard that name before. Is it a band from the ’70s?”

But of course it is. And the follow-up question is always, “Does your lab’s name have anything to do with the band?”

Well, it does and it doesn’t. The name was chosen many years ago for two reasons: to celebrate one of my all-time favorite rock bands, AC/DC, and to outline the scope of my research laboratory – ACDC stands for Advanced Centre for Detection of Cancer.

I have tried repeatedly to reach out to AC/DC and let them know about the research laboratory that shares their name and is devoted to fighting cancer, but with no success. In fact, not only is the lab named after them, but to celebrate the music of AC/DC, we formed a rock band within the lab with me representing Angus Young (lead guitarist and music composer) and my graduate students playing the other members. We created a poster and shot a video of the AC/DC song “ Chase the Ace.”

Until recently, I thought naming a research lab after a rock band was rather unique. That changed when, in 2014, I met my friend and fellow physician and scientist Steven Boyages from Australia. Boyages revealed that he’d created a digital communications company and named it “Red Zeppelin” to celebrate the legendary rock band Led Zeppelin. The name is meant to connote inspiration, and capture the imagination and innovation of the band.

Eleftherios P. Diamandis

Eleftherios P. Diamandis is the chair in prostate cancer biomarkers and head of clinical biochemistry, Mount Sinai Hospital, and head of the division of clinical biochemistry in the department of laboratory medicine and pathobiology, University of Toronto.

Join the ASBMB Today mailing list

Sign up to get updates on articles, interviews and events.

Latest in Opinions

Opinions highlights or most popular articles

How I realized that LGBT+ scientists like me can inspire others in their field
Diversity

How I realized that LGBT+ scientists like me can inspire others in their field

June 12, 2021

Far too many LGBT+ scientists still report fear in their workplaces, but I have hope for change.

Reimagining STEM workforce development as a braided river
Jobs

Reimagining STEM workforce development as a braided river

June 11, 2021

A contemporary approach to today’s science careers looks less like a structured pipeline and more like a collection of paths that change and adapt to the needs of the individual.

Rethinking the NIH review system
Funding

Rethinking the NIH review system

June 10, 2021

Proposals for change include a tiered grant funding system, tweaks to scoring and criteria, internal reviews and a continuous submission system.

What does a scientist look like?
Diversity

What does a scientist look like?

June 5, 2021

After the program, more students drew pictures of scientists as themselves or people of color, demonstrating that they are internalizing an identity of becoming a scientist.

Giving students tools to forge a new path
Observance

Giving students tools to forge a new path

June 4, 2021

"At every level of education, we need a system that is student-centric and that provides opportunities for all to pursue degrees that will allow them to become what they want to be."

Save the microbes!
Essay

Save the microbes!

May 22, 2021

Recent data suggest that microbial diversity is under threat — which puts the entire planet at risk