Blotter

The ASBMB responds
to Trump's national address

Benjamin Corb
Jan. 8, 2019

The following is a statement from Benjamin Corb, public affairs director for the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

 


Later this evening, President Donald Trump will take to the airwaves to make the case for building a wall on the nation’s southern border. The wall comes with a $5 billion price tag, to be paid for by the American taxpayers.  Border security is important, but immigration experts from across the political spectrum argue there is not a crisis that requires this level of investment.

If the president is looking for ways to invest $5 billion that will make a difference to all Americans, might we suggest, first, ending the government shutdown that has stopped the National Science Foundation – for example – from investing in American scientists from coast to coast. Between Jan. 1 and Jan. 8, 2018, the NSF had funded 108 research grants valued at $42 million. During that period this year, the NSF has issued no grants. So let’s end the science shutdown. And if the president is still looking to spend $5 billion in new investments, we have some suggestions.

The president could support the American scientific enterprise by:

Or, the president could support the next generation of scientists by:

Border security is important. But so is supporting the American scientist. President Trump needs to end this political charade over funding for a border wall, negotiate in good faith and work with Congress to reopen the government so that scientists can go back to helping build a stronger, safer, healthier and more prosperous America.

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Benjamin Corb

Benjamin Corb is the former director of public affairs at ASBMB.

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