July 21–24, 2022 | Kansas City, Mo.

Evolution and Core Processes in Gene Expression

Evolution and core processes in gene expression
July 21–24, 2022 | Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, Mo.

The focus of this meeting is to discuss the most recent insights into the cis-regulatory code, how cis-regulatory information is read out by transcription factors, signaling pathways and other proteins, how cellular diversity is created during development and how we can study this problem using cutting-edge genomics technology and computational methods.

We will simultaneously examine the problem from an evolutionary perspective: how cis-regulatory elements evolve, how regulatory variation affects gene expression and phenotypes, how these changes have shaped development and parallel evolution, and how noise affects regulatory circuits and their evolution.

Important dates

May 25 Early registration deadline
May 25 Poster abstract submission deadline
June 20 Regular registration deadline

Meeting time and location

Evolution and core processes in gene expression will be held at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research in Kansas City, Mo. 

Conference starts: Thursday, July 21, at 1 p.m. 
Conference ends: Sunday, July 24, at 12 p.m.

Full conference program to be posted at a later date.

Sponsorship opportunities

The conference is offering a variety of sponsorship opportunities for your organization to optimize your visibility to attendees. Learn about sponsorship opportunities.

COVID-19 vaccine requirement

For the health and safety of attendees, COVID-19 vaccination is required for anyone attending this conference. Mask-wearing and other requirements will be based on state and local guidelines and will be communicated with attendees before the start of the event.

Access the latest COVID-19 guidelines from:

Interview

The gene expression conference that keeps evolving

Almost a decade since its inception, and after a brief delay caused by COVID-19, a meeting dedicated to discussing the evolution and core processes in gene expression will reemerge in Kansas City this summer.

Organizers

Julia Zeitlinger Stowers Institute for Medical Research
David Arnosti Michigan State University
Justin Fay University of Rochester
Nicolas Rohner Stowers Institute for Medical Research

Speakers

  • Frank Albert, University of Minnesota
  • Courtney C. Babbitt, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Carl de Boer, University of British Columbia
  • Rachel Brem, University of California, Berkeley
  • Leandra Brettner, Arizona State University
  • Barak Cohen, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Angela DePace, Harvard University
  • Hernan Garcia, University of California, Berkeley
  • Nicolas Gompel, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich
  • Raluca Gordan, Duke University
  • Jeffrey Kidd, University of Michigan
  • Justin Kinney, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
  • Anshul Kundaje, Stanford University
  • Ricardo Mallarino, Princeton University
  • Armin Moczek, Indiana University
  • Stephanie Moon - University of Michigan
  • Shaun Mahony, Pennsylvania State University
  • Sara Mostafavi, University of Washington
  • Dimple Notani, National Center For Biological Sciences
  • Srinivas Ramachandran, University of Colorado
  • Mark Rebeiz, University of Pittsburgh
  • Tatjana Sauka–Spengler, Stowers Institute for Medical Research
  • Premal Shah, Rutgers University
  • Alex Stark, Research Institute of Molecular Pathology
  • Jussi Taipale, University of Cambridge
  • Patricia Wittkopp, University of Michigan
  • Emily Wong, Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute

Abstracts

Abstracts will be reviewed and selected for short talks. Those not selected will be programmed as posters.

Oral abstract submission deadline: May 6. Oral programming notifications, including time and date of presentation, will be sent via email by May 20.

Poster abstract submission deadline: May 25. Poster programming notifications will be sent via email by June 2.

Submit abstract

Abstract submission guidelines

  • Abstract title field allows 200 characters maximum.
  • Abstract body field allows 350 words maximum (not including authors and affiliations).
  • Text may be typed or copied and pasted into the abstract title and body fields.

Presentation requirements

All speakers and poster presenters are required to present in-person at the scheduled date and time of their sessions.

How to submit an abstract

ASBMB members
  1. Click “Submit Abstract" button.
  2. Enter the email address associated with your ASBMB member profile. (Don't remember the email associated with your member record? Contact membership@asbmb.org before proceeding.)
  3. Once your email address is validated by the system, enter the password associated with your ASBMB member profile. (Don't remember your password? Click "Forgot your password?" to have your password emailed to you. Check your junk mail and spam filter if you do not see the reminder email in your inbox.)
  4. Do NOT create a new profile if you do not remember either the email address or the password associated with your ASBMB membership account. Contact membership@asbmb.org and request this information prior to submitting.
  5. Select the, "Submit and Continue" button at the bottom of the page.
  6. Select the "Submit Abstract" button to enter your abstract submission.
Non-members
  1. Click “Submit Abstract" button.
  2. Click the "Create an ASBMB Account" button to set up your user profile.
  3. Complete the profile fields and select the, "Submit and Continue" button at the bottom of the page.
  4. Select the "Submit Abstract" button to enter your abstract submission.

Registration

ASBMB members receive a $50 discount off their registration fee, which will be applied during check-out.

Not a member? Join the ASBMB and save!

  Early registration
(by May 25)
Regular registration
(by June 20)
Trainee: Graduate student or postdoc
with single lodging
$805 $855
Trainee: Graduate student or postdoc
with double lodging (shared room with another meeting attendee)
$705 $755
Trainee: Graduate student or postdoc
commuter (no lodging)
$355 $405
PI, industry or equivalent
with single lodging
$1,105 $1,155
PI, industry or equivalent
commuter (no lodging)
$655 $705

What’s included

The full conference package includes:

  • All scientific sessions, poster sessions and meeting materials.
  • Continental breakfast, lunch, morning/afternoon refreshments on meeting days.
  • Two networking dinners.
  • Lodging for three nights (arriving on July 21, departing on July 24) at the Kansas City Marriott Country Club Plaza.

Note: Lodging is not included in the commuter rates.

Registration changes

Registration changes will be accepted as space allows until June 21, 2022, and can be made by contacting meetings@asbmb.org.

Cancellation policy

Cancellations received in writing on or before June 21, 2022, are subject to a $100 processing fee. No refunds will be issued for cancellations after June 21 due to final guarantee commitments. Email meetings@asbmb.org and attach a copy of your meeting registration receipt/paid invoice.

Hotel accommodation

Lodging arrangements will be made at the Kansas City Marriott Country Club Plaza. All housing arrangements must be made through ASBMB during the registration process.

If you require an early arrival or late departure (one night pre- and/or post-meeting) you may purchase these additional nights during the registration process, $175 per room per night ($185 per room per night for double occupancy), inclusive of taxes.

Preliminary schedule

This is a preliminary schedule and subject to change.

Thursday July 21
Friday July 22
Saturday July 23
Sunday July 24

Thursday agenda

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Auditorium foyer

Badge and program pickup

1:45 PM - 2:00 PM
Auditorium

Welcome and meeting introduction

2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Auditorium

Session I: Enhancer evolution

How do enhancers evolve?
Emily Wong, Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute
Relating enhancer genetic variation across mammals to complex phenotypes using machine learning
Irene Kaplow, Carnegie Mellon University
The robustness and evolvability of a developmental enhancer
Timothy Fuqua, University of Zurich
Evolutionary modulation of transcriptional enhancer activity and accessibility in Drosophila
Nicolas Gompel, Ludwig-Maximilians Universität München
3:15 PM - 3:45 PM

Break

3:50 PM - 5:00 PM
Auditorium

Session II: Mechanisms of regulatory divergence

Tempo and mode of gene expression evolution in the brain across primates
Courtney Babbitt, University of Massachusetts Amherst
Inferring evolutionary mechanisms and transcription factor function from profiles of cis-regulatory divergence between mouse species
Rachel Brem, University of California, Berkeley
Development of stem cell approaches to characterize cell type and stage-specific cis-regulatory variation in mouse embryonic development
Thomas Vierbuchen, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
Evolutionary dynamics of a robust transcriptional network
Pinar Onal, Northwestern University
5:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Gallery

Poster session I

7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Gallery

Opening reception and dinner

Friday agenda

8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Auditorium foyer

Badge and program pickup

9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Auditorium

Session III: The cis-regulatory code of enhancers

Decoding transcriptional regulation in Drosophila
Alex Stark, Research Institute of Molecular Pathology
Towards predicting gene expression from sequence
Jussi Taipale, University of Helsinki
Learning causal rules of immune cell differentiation within and across species
Sara Mostafavi, University of Washington
So just what is an enhancer, anyway?
Marc Halfon, State University of New York at Buffalo
10:15 AM - 10:35 AM

Break

10:35 AM - 12:00 PM
Auditorium

Session IV: Cis-regulatory code and chromatin

Paralogous transcription factors diversify their DNA-binding targets via differential abilities to engage inaccessible chromatin
Shaun Mahony, Pennsylvania State University
Using genomics to study chromatin structure and dynamics
Srinivas Ramachandran, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus
Control of enhancer activity by DNA methylation
Arnaud Krebs, European Molecular Biology Laboratory
The mutagenic cost of transcriptional regulation
Raluca Gordan, Duke University
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Gallery

Lunch

1:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Gallery

Poster session II

3:30 PM - 4:35 PM
Auditorium

Session V: Enhancer interactions and development decisions

Dissecting enhancers hierarchy: one enhancer cluster at a time
Dimple Notani, National Centre for Biological Sciences
Distal and proximal cis-regulatory elements sense X chromosome dosage and developmental state at the Xist locus
Till Schwämmle, Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics
Spatial specificity of mammalian enhancer loops in vivo
Evgeny Kvon, University of California, Irvine
Gene regulatory networks for neural crest in zebrafish
Tatjana Sauka–Spengler, Stowers Institute for Medical Research
4:35 PM - 5:00 PM

Break

5:00 PM - 6:35 PM
Auditorium

Session VI: Predictive modeling and biophysics

Using physics as a microscope to dissect transcriptional dynamics in development
Hernan Garcia, University of California, Berkeley
Massively parallel reporter assays, machine learning, and the biophysics of gene regulation
Justin Kinney, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
Deciphering the cis-regulatory grammar of Hippo signaling transcription factors in mouse trophoblast stem cells
Julia Zeitlinger, Stowers Institute for Medical Research
Deep learning oracles for genomic discovery
Anshul Kundaje, Stanford University
The dynamic cis-regulatory sequence syntax on transcriptional regulatory elements in the human genome
Vivek Ramalingam, Stanford University

Saturday agenda

8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Auditorium foyer

Badge and program pickup

9:00 AM - 10:05 AM
Auditorium

Session VII: Predictive models and divergence

Understanding cis-regulatory evolution using machine learning and random DNA
Carl de Boer, University of British Columbia
Multi-factor ChIP-exo reveals TF binding dynamics within conserved orthologous cis regulatory modules in the mammalian liver
Michael Wilson, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto
Turn it off or keep it on: the role of silencers and maintenance elements in phenotypic evolution
Mark Rebeiz, University of Pittsburgh
Identifying the enhancers and evolutionary processes shaping the Drosophila innate immune response
Zeba Wunderlich, Boston University
10:05 AM - 10:30 AM

Break

10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Auditorium

Session VIII: Causes and consequences of regulatory variation

Pleiotropic effects of cis- and trans-regulatory mutations on fitness and gene expression
Patirica Wittkopp, University of Michigan
Loss of heterochromatin at endogenous retroviruses creates competition for transcription factor binding
Ryan O’Hara, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
Evolutionary innovations in eukaryotic histone repertoires drive biological novelties
Pravrutha Raman, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center
11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Lunch

3:00 PM - 4:10 PM
Auditorium

Session IX: TBD

A single-cell massively parallel reporter assay detects the effect of cell type specific cis-regulatory activity
Barak Cohen, Washington University in St. Louis
Multiplex functional dissection of cis-regulatory landscapes in early mammalian development
Samual Regalado, University of Washington
A single-cell view of male genitalia development and evolution
Anna Urum, Israel Institute of Technology
An ultra high-throughput, massively multiplexible, single-cell RNA-seq platform in yeasts that facilitates the extensive study of core processes in gene expression
Leandra Brettner, Arizona State University
4:10 PM - 4:30 PM

Break

4:30 PM - 5:40 PM
Auditorium

Session X: Evolutionary divergence and stress

Genetic variation in the ubiquitin system creates complex, pathway-specific effects on proteasomal protein degradation
Frank Albert, University of Minnesota
Characterizing the grammar of stress-dependent gene regulatory elements
Morgan Sammons, State University of New York at Albany
Why do transcription factors depend on coactivators?
Lindsey Snyder, University of Iowa
Dual roles for valosin-containing protein in stress granule assembly and disassembly
Stephanie Moon, University of Michigan
5:45 PM - 7:00 PM

Dinner at Stowers Library

Sunday agenda

9:00 AM - 10:10 AM
Auditorium

Session XI: Evolution of novelty/diversity

On the origins of novelty and diversity in development and evolution: case studies on horned beetles
Armin Moczek, Indiana University Bloomington
A regulatory network of Sox and Six transcription factors initiate a cell fate transformation during hearing regeneration in adult zebrafish
Erin Jimenez, National Institutes of Health
Evolution and binding specificity SIX homeodomain transcription factors
Jose Rodriguez–Martinez, University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras Campus
The developmental basis of phenotypic novelty: How to build a gliding mammal
Ricardo Mallarino, Princeton University
10:10 AM - 10:30 AM

Break

10:30 AM - 11:40 AM
Auditorium

Session XII: Rapid evolution

Elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying canine domestication
Jeffrey Kidd, University of Michigan
Fish(ing) in the Hi(gh)-C(sea)
Tathagata Biswas, Stowers Institute for Medical Research
Transcription factor binding sites are frequently under accelerated evolution in primates
Xinru Zhang, Pennsylvania State University
The landscape of molecular changes underlying 22 years of bacterial adaptation
Premal Shah, Rutgers University

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