May 17–20, 2022 | Madison, Wis.

ESCRT biology

ESCRT biology
May 17–20, 2022 | University of Wisconsin–Madison

This meeting will provide a unique, open, inclusive and interactive forum for the international and domestic research community working on ESCRT biology and be an effective learning environment for all participants, especially graduate students, postdocs and other researchers from diverse backgrounds.

The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery comprises a series of different factors (about 30 proteins in humans; about 45 in plants) that facilitate membrane remodeling and fission reactions throughout the cell.

Over the past decade, there has been an explosion in the number of processes now known to be ESCRT-mediated, including endosomal protein trafficking, cytokinetic abscission, closure of the post-mitotic nuclear envelope, enveloped virus budding, exosome biogenesis, neuronal pruning and membrane repair. Furthermore, ESCRT-like systems have recently been discovered in archaea and bacteria, making this one of the most highly conserved machines in nature. 

This meeting will bring together experts in disciplines as diverse as biophysics, plant biology, cell biology, biochemistry and structural biology from around the world to cover key aspects of ESCRT biology.

Graduate students, postdocs and other researchers established in or wishing to learn about ESCRT biology are encouraged to attend and submit abstracts. The organizers will select oral presenters and there will be a poster session.

Important dates

April 19 Registration deadline

Sponsorship opportunities

The conference is offering a variety of sponsorship opportunities for your organization to optimize your visibility to attendees. Learn about sponsorship opportunities

Organizers

Wes Sundquist University of Utah School of Medicine
Anjon Audhya University of Wisconsin–Madison
John McCullough University of Utah School of Medicine
Marisa Otegui University of Wisconsin–Madison

Image

Left: ESCRT (Vps4) mutants block multivesicular body sorting in yeast. Upper: GFP-CPS cargo mis-sorted to the limiting membrane of vacuoles in vps4 mutant cells. Lower: GFP-CPS cargo sorted to the vacuolar lumen of wild type cells. Image credit: Scott Emr.

Middle: Verdant plant life growing from an interwoven VIPP1 ring structure. VIPP1 (vesicle-inducing protein in plastids) is a conserved membrane-remodeling protein that builds the thylakoid membranes of cyanobacteria, algae and plants. VIPP1, along with its bacterial homolog PspA, are recently described members of the ESCRT-III superfamily of membrane remodelers, extending the conservation of ESCRT-III across all major domains of life. Image credit: Ben Engel and Verena Resch (https://luminous-lab.com).

Right: Representative brain scans in frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 3 (FTD-3) patients. Mutations in the ESCRT-III protein CHMP2B are a rare cause of autosomal dominant FTD. Left: MRI structural scan. Right: Cerebral blood flow as measured by PET scanning. Image Credit: Isaacs et al. Curr Alzheimers Res. PMCID: PMC3182073.

Speaker information

  • Please check the schedule below for your dedicated talk time.
  • Session room will be equipped with standard projection equipment which includes data projector, laptop, clicker, laser pointer and technician.
  • Check in with the AV tech in the room at least 30 minutes prior to the session your talk is in.
  • Bring your presentation on a readable USB flash drive. The AV tech will assist you in loading it onto the PC laptop provided.
  • When preparing your presentation, please use standard fonts (e.g., Times, New Roman, Ariel, Helvetica, etc.). If you are using a font that is not standard it should be embedded into your PowerPoint presentation.
  • Create your presentation using 16:9 aspect ratio.
  • In the same folder as your presentation, include any external files that are used in the presentation, e.g. video files. Copy the entire folder to a USB flash drive.
  • Test your presentation on a separate laptop to ensure that the fonts are standard and that components such as movies are included rather than linked in your presentation.
  • Mac presentations created in Keynote will not be supported. Those individuals using Mac computers must bring their own laptop that will be tied into the switcher to run their presentations. You must also bring the appropriate adapter. We would prefer if you bring on a flash drive and load onto the provided computer.
  • Microphones in the session room are provided to ensure that everyone can clearly hear the presentations. Presenters should be mindful of those who are hard of hearing and always use the supplied microphones.
  • If you choose to present with your own laptop you must provide your own adapter to HDMI connections.

Poster presentation information

  • Poster board useable space is 46”x46”.
  • Push pins will be provided.
  • Set up your poster on Tuesday, May 17, anytime between 1–3 p.m. or Wednesday, May 18, during breakfast (8–9 a.m.).
  • Remove your poster on Friday, May 20, after the closing remarks of the meeting.
  • Your poster will be displayed throughout the duration of the meeting allowing attendees to view it during breaks.
  • Poster presentations are scheduled for Thursday, May 19, from 1:30–3:30 p.m.
    • Odd numbers: 1:30–2:30 p.m.
    • Even numbers: 2:30–3:30 p.m.

Please refer to the meeting program onsite for your poster board number or email meetings@asbmb.org if you have any questions.

General attendee information

Lake Mendota activity

We have booked pontoon tours at Lake Mendota for Wednesday, May 18. Following lunch we will walk as a group to Lake Mendota to board our pontoon boats. Ice cream will also be provided for us at Daily Scoop Memorial Union. A liability waiver must be filled out prior to participating in the pontoon activity. Please stop by the badge pick-up desk to sign this waiver. 

Please dress for windy and changeable weather. Bring a windbreaker and/or heavier jacket and comfortable shoes.

Luggage storage

Luggage storage is available in conference room 1260 at the Discovery Building on Tuesday, May 17, from 12–6 p.m., and on Friday, May 20, from 8 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Sponsors

COVID-19 vaccine requirement

For the health and safety of attendees, COVID-19 vaccination is required for anyone attending this conference. Effective March 12, 2022, masks may be worn but are no longer required inside university buildings. Masks are required when visiting the University Club COVID-19 test site and other clinical spaces on campus, including University Health Services. Please check UW–Madison Transportation Services and Madison Metro for current mask requirements for public transportation, including campus buses.You should wear a mask for 10 days following a positive COVID-19 test and for 10 days following an exposure to someone with COVID-19.

Access the latest COVID-19 guidelines from:

What’s included

The full conference package includes:

  • All scientific sessions, poster sessions and meeting materials.
  • Continental breakfast, lunch and morning/afternoon refreshments.

Note: Lodging is not included in the registration rates.

Registration changes

Registration changes will be accepted as space allows until April 19, 2022, and can be made by contacting meetings@asbmb.org.

Cancellation policy

Cancellations received in writing on or before April 19, 2022, are subject to a $100 processing fee. No refunds will be issued for cancellations after April 19 due to final guarantee commitments. Email meetings@asbmb.org and attach a copy of your meeting registration receipt/paid invoice.

Meeting time and location

The ESCRT biology conference will be held in the Discovery Building on the campus of the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Conference starts: Tuesday, May 17, 1–3 p.m. (Registration)
Conference ends: Friday, May 20, 12 p.m. (Closing remarks)

Hotel accommodation

Participants are responsible for securing and paying for their own housing arrangements. Room blocks have been arranged at the following hotels:

Best Western Plus Inntowner

2424 University Avenue
Madison, WI 53726

Rate: $149.99 + tax per night
Online reservations
By phone: Call 608-233-8778 then select option 1. Reference group code 1753-1.
Rooms will be available at this rate until April 21, 2022 or until the block sells out.
Rate includes: Complimentary parking, breakfast, Wi-Fi and local shuttle service

DoubleTree by Hilton Madison

525 West Johnson Street
Madison, WI 53703

Rate: $149 + tax per night
Online reservations
By phone: Call 608.251.5511 and ask for the ESCRT Biology Conference group rate
Rooms will be available at this rate until April 26, 2022 or until the block sells out.
Rate includes: Complimentary parking, breakfast, Wi-Fi, local and airport shuttle service

Wisconsin Union Hotel & Club Suites

UW-Madison Union South, 1308 W. Dayton St.
Madison, WI 53715

Rate: $165 + tax per night
Online reservations use group code: ESCRT2022
By phone: Call 608.263.2600 and ask for the ESCRT2022 group rate
Rooms will be available at this rate until April 15, 2022 or until the block sells out.
Rate includes: Complimentary parking

Program schedule

Tuesday May 17
Wednesday May 18
Thursday May 19
Friday May 20

Tuesday agenda

1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Atrium

Badge pickup

2:45 PM - 6:00 PM

Session I — ESCRT-mediated membrane remodeling (Part I)

2:45 PM - 3:00 PM
DeLuca Forum

Introduction to the ESCRT meeting

3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
DeLuca Forum

Invited Talks

(25 min. talk + 5 min. Q&A)

The unique mechanism of ESCRT-III-mediated membrane remodeling
Aurélien Roux, University of Geneva
Cryo-EM structure of helical CHMP2A-CHMP3 filaments and membrane cleavage
Winfried Weissenhorn, Université Grenoble Alpes
EMBO Young Investigator Lecture
The role of VIPP1, the photosynthetic ESCRT-III, in thylakoid biogenesis and maintenance
Ben Engel, University of Basel
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Atrium

Coffee/poster viewing break

5:00 PM - 6:00 PM
DeLuca Forum

Selected talks

(15 min. talk + 5 min. Q&A)

Spastin, a microtubule-severing ATPase and ESCRT-III associated protein, functions in ER morphogenesis
Crystal Lee, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
PTPN23-dependent ESCRT function controls the spatiotemporal regulation of death receptors to restrain PANoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells
Dongyan Song, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
Liver-specific Tsg101 depletion causes apoptosis, cell death and liver failure
Surui Wang, Helmholtz Center Munich

Wednesday agenda

8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
Atrium

Breakfast

8:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Atrium

Badge pickup

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Session II — ESCRT-mediated membrane remodeling (Part II)

9:00 AM - 10:30 AM
DeLuca Forum

Invited talks

(25 min. talk + 5 min. Q&A)

Bacterial Vipp1 and PspA are members of the ancient ESCRT-III membrane-remodeling superfamily
Harry Low, Imperial College London
EMBO Young Investigator Lecture
Modelling ESCRT-III filaments in reshaping cells across evolution
Andela Saric, University College London
ESCRT-III filaments must change geometry with membrane curvature
Buzz Baum, University College London
10:30 AM - 11:00 AM
Atrium

Coffee/poster viewing break

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
DeLuca Forum

Selected talks

(15 min. talk + 5 min. Q&A)

Calpain-7 interacts with the ESCRT-III protein IST1 to regulate abscission and the NoCut checkpoint
Elliott Paine, University of Utah
Tuning ESCRT-III functions at the (micro-)nuclear envelope
Coen Campsteijn, University of Oslo
Lysosomes are required for early dorsal signaling in the Xenopus embryo
Nydia Tejeda Muñoz, University of California, Los Angeles
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Atrium

Lunch

2:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Lake Mendota

4:30 PM - 7:30 PM

Session III — ESCRTs in cell division

4:30 PM - 6:00 PM
DeLuca Forum

Invited talks

(25 min. talk + 5 min. Q&A)

Sensing and protecting persisting DNA bridges by the ESCRT machinery
Juan Martin Serrano, King's College, London
ESCRTs across scales: from zebrafish embryogenesis to Asgard archaea
Natalie Elia, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
Comprehensive analysis of the human ESCRT-III-MIT domain interactome reveals new cofactors for cytokinetic abscission
Dawn Wenzel, Medical College of Wisconsin
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Atrium

Coffee/poster viewing break

6:30 PM - 7:30 PM
DeLuca Forum

Selected talks

(15 min. talk + 5 min. Q&A)

PP2A-B56e interacts with Chmp4C and opposes the abscission checkpoint
Thomas Panagiotou, University of Toronto
Deubiquitinase USP8 targets ESCRT-III to promote incomplete cell division
Juliette Mathieu, Collège de France
The mechanistic role of ALIX condensates in abscission checkpoint
Lalit Deshmukh, University of California, San Diego

Thursday agenda

8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
Atrium

Breakfast

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Session IV — Cell biology of the ESCRT machinery

9:00 AM - 10:30 AM
DeLuca Forum

Invited talks

(25 min. talk + 5 min. Q&A)

In vitro reconstitution of ESCRT recruitment and membrane scission
James Hurley, University of California, Berkeley
ESCRT-mediated membrane sealing
Harald Stenmark, Oslo University Hospital
The role of ESCRT machinery in cancer cell biology
Marta Miaczynska, International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology in Warsaw
10:30 AM - 11:00 AM
Atrium

Coffee/poster viewing break

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
DeLuca Forum

Selected talks

(15 min. talk + 5 min. Q&A)

Peroxisomes form intralumenal vesicles with roles in fatty acid catabolism and protein compartmentalization in Arabidopsis
Zachary Wright, Rice University
Clearance of nuclear and cytosolic inclusions at nuclear–vacuolar junctions
Emily Sontag, Marquette University
Perturbation of the endosomal sorting factor HD-PTP disrupts RTK signaling and cholesterol distribution
Destiny Schultz, Mayo Clinic
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Atrium

Lunch

1:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Atrium

Poster session

3:30 PM - 6:30 PM

Session V — ESCRTs at the nuclear membrane

3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
DeLuca Forum

Invited talks

(25 min. talk + 5 min. Q&A)

BROX regulates compressive forces at the NE to re-establish nuclear compartmentalization
Monica Agromayor, King's College, London
Spatiotemporal control of ESCRT-III assembly at the reforming nuclear envelope
Jez Carlton, King's College, London
ESCRTs and lipid synthesis cooperate to mediate formation of a single nuclear compartment
Shirin Bahmanyar, Yale University
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Atrium

Coffee/poster viewing break

5:30 PM - 6:30 PM
DeLuca Forum

Selected talks

(15 min. talk + 5 min. Q&A)

ESCRTs restrict the size of a mitotic nuclear envelope hole to maintain nucleocytoplasmic compartmentalization
Nicholas Ader, Yale School of Medicine
ESCRT-III regulation by LGD-1 at multivesicular endosomes
Aryel Clarke, University of Wisconsin–Madison
TORC1 regulates vacuole membrane composition through ubiquitin- and ESCRT-dependent microautophagy
Xi Yang, University of Michigan
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Pyle Center Alumni Lounge

Banquet

Lifetime achievement award presentation to Scott Emr.

Friday agenda

8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
Atrium

Breakfast

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Session VI — ESCRT machinery in other systems

9:00 AM - 10:30 AM
DeLuca Forum

Invited talks

(25 min. talk + 5 min. Q&A)

Multiple functions of the plant unique ESCRT component FREE1 in Arabidopsis thaliana
Liwen Jiang, Chinese University of Hong Kong
Cryo-EM reveals structures of ESCRT-III membrane remodeling proteins in eukarya and bacteria
Carsten Sachse, Forschungszentrum Jülich
Recruiting ESCRTs
Erika Isono, University of Konstanz
10:30 AM - 11:00 AM
Atrium

Coffee/poster viewing break

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
DeLuca Forum

Selected talks

(15 min. talk + 5 min. Q&A)

Mechanisms for host ESCRT machinery recruitment to the replicative compartment of Toxoplasma gondii
Yolanda Rivera–Cuevas, University of Michigan
Investigating the role of Arabidopsis IST1-like proteins in plants 
Ariadna Gonzalez Solis, University of Wisconsin–Madison
Regulation of autophagosome closure by the VPS37A-containing ESCRT-I complex
Yoshinori Takahasi, Penn State College of Medicine
12:00 PM - 12:15 PM
DeLuca Forum

ESCRT biology meeting: Closing remarks

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