April 27–30 Virtual

Thank you for attending the 2021 ASBMB Annual Meeting held in conjunction with Experimental Biology!

Visit the EB registration resource center to get your certificate of attendance.

Abstracts are available in The FASEB Journal Volume 35, Issue S1.

Program planning committee co-chairs

Robert S. Haltiwanger
Robert S. Haltiwanger
University of Georgia
Carla Koehler
Carla Koehler
University of California, Los Angeles

See full list of organizers >

What you need to know

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Program schedule

Deepen your knowledge of research trends at sessions curated by pioneers and innovators.

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ASBMB Award lectures

Twelve outstanding professionals recognized by their peers for contributions to their fields, education and diversity.

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Interest group networking events

Network with fellow researchers in your field of interest.

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Workshops

Experts share the latest methodologies, technology and tools, and insights on how to flourish in your field.

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Career Central

Step up to Experimental Biology Career Central and take the next step in your career.

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Undergraduate Poster Competition

The virtual Undergraduate Poster Competition will take place April 19–23, 2021.

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Exhibits and sponsorships

Information for exhibitors and sponsors.

Program schedule

All times listed are U.S. Eastern Daylight Time (GMT-4)

Monday April 26
Tuesday April 27
Wednesday April 28
Thursday April 29
Friday April 30

Monday agenda

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Protein interest group — Protein quality control

Chairs: Danish Khan, Stanford University, and Emily Sontag, Marquette University

The goal of this interest group event is to build a community of researchers in the field of protein quality control (PQC). This event will bring together faculty working in the area of PQC and early career researchers including undergraduate and graduate researchers from diverse backgrounds.

Multiple neurodegenerative diseases are linked to protein misfolding caused due to failure of PQC. Understanding the cellular responses to aberrations in PQC is thus an active area of research. Attendees will gain insights about the ‘big questions’ of PQC field and learn about the approaches being taken to understand the basic biology of PQC and PQC-related diseases.

Continue the conversation on the interest group Slack channel: #asbmb-protein-interest-group-

Bede Portz, University of Pennsylvania
Kelly Rainbolt, Stanford University
Eszter Zavodszky, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology
Kiersten M. Ruff, Washington University in St. Louis
Rocio Gomez-Pastor, University of Minnesota
Sonya Neal, University of California, San Diego
Darcie Moore, University of Wisconsin
Heeseon An, Memorial Sloan Kettering
10:00 AM - 1:00 PM

Signaling interest group — Cellular communication in health and disease

Chairs: Michelle Mendoza, University of Utah, and Roberto Zoncu, University of California, Berkeley

The goal of this interest group is to build a community of researchers in the field of signaling.

The session will cover current topics and innovative approaches to studying cellular communication, including metabolic signaling, cancer cell signaling and stress response. Special emphasis will be placed on advanced approaches to the study and manipulation of signal transduction, including high-throughput methods, single molecule imaging and quantitative modeling. 

Target audience: Researchers at all levels interested in this topic.

Continue the conversation on the interest group Slack channel: #asbmb-signaling-interest-group

Towards reconstituting the membrane bound mTORC1 signaling system
Yemima Rose Citron, University of California, Berkeley
Reciprocal mechanosignaling between the extracellular matrix and cancer cells in early lung cancer
Rebecca Zitnay, University of Utah
Dynamics and heterogeneity of Erk-induced immediate-early gene expression
Siddhartha (Sidu) Jena, Princeton University
Dynamics of 3D genome organization at single-molecule resolution in living cells
Anders Sejr Hansen, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Dynamic information exchange between ERK, AKT, mTOR, and AMPK: Quantitative models of metabolic homeostasis and growth control
John Albeck, University of California, Davis
Lacramioara (Lacra) Bintu, Stanford University
Spatiotemporal regulation of AMPK revealed by a sensitive kinase activity reporter
Danielle Schmitt, University of California, San Diego
LiP-MS: A structural proteomics approach for studying pathway activation
Valentina Cappelletti, ETH Zurich
Coordination between fast migrating tumor cells and their microenvironment in mediating melanoma metastasis
Amanpreet Kaur, University of Pennsylvania
Sabrina Spencer, University of Colorado
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Mitochondria interest group

Chairs: Oleh Khalimonchuk, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, and Laura Lackner, Northwestern University

The goal of this interest group is to build a community for researchers in the field of mitochondria.

This interest group event will promote cross-talk across the areas of basic mitochondrial biology and molecular mechanisms of disease and aging, and provide an opportunity for biomedical researchers to explore and discover potentially unrecognized mechanisms of disease. Holding an interest group meeting that focuses on the diverse aspects of mitochondria and pathways that underlie the pathophysiologic mechanisms of age-associated diseases will provide a forum for uniquely gathering the international community of scientists in mitochondria, cell metabolism, and aging research. 

Target audience: Anyone interested in mitochondrial biology and the multifaceted roles of mitochondria in cellular and systemic physiology.

Continue the conversation on the interest group Slack channel: #asbmb-mitochondria-interest-group-

Molecular mechanisms and functions at mitochondria-lysosome contact sites
Yvette Wong, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
The role of GTP-dependent assembly in mitofusin-mediated mitochondrial fusion
Suzanne Hoppins, University of Washington
mtFAS: Not just another way to make fatty acids
Sara Nowinski, University of Utah
Spatial organization of assembly of the mitochondria cristae-organizing MICOS complex
Jonathan Friedman, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
Translational regulation of yeast mitoribosome biogenesis
Flavia Fontanesi, University of Miami
Loss of OPA-1 in skeletal muscle increases mitochondrial endoplasmic reticulum contact formation
Antentor Hinton, University of Iowa
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Research education interest group — Collaborative teaching through CURES

Chairs: Ellis Bell, University of San Diego, and Regina Stevens-Truss, Kalamazoo College

The goal of this interest group is to build a community of researchers in the field of collaborative teaching through CURES.

CURES are authentic research experiences incorporated into a regularly scheduled course, making research accessible to all students. They include seven common elements of a research experience: relevance, scientific background, hypothesis development, proposal, experiments (including iteration)/teamwork to explore the hypothesis, data analysis and evidence-based conclusions, and presentation. CURES can be stand-alone or integrated either vertically or horizontally with other courses or institutions to increase emphasis on interdisciplinarity or scientific collaboration, and have been shown to be a high impact teaching practice.

This interest group event will catalyze interdisciplinary discussions around CUREs for teaching undergraduate biology and chemistry — and classes at the interface of these two disciplines, including biochemistry and molecular biology, build community and connect faculty and aspiring faculty with CURE mentors. The focus will be on interinstitutional collaborative CUREs and the key role of student hypothesis development and approaches to build student ownership of the CURE research.

Attendees will learn about the growing community of educators engaging in teaching protocols to increase research based experiences for undergraduate students. In addition, attendees, especially educators from 2-year colleges and postdoctoral fellows, will connect with the newly created CUREs community, OUR CUREs, and experience CURE faculty mentors. 

Target audience: Faculty from diverse institutions (community colleges, PUIs, comprehensive and R1 institutions) interested in learning about course-based undergraduate research (CURE) teaching and postdocs and graduate students interested in teaching paradigms.

Continue the conversation on the interest group Slack channel: #asbmb-research-education-interest-group-

Incorporating your own research into a CURE
Anthony Bell, University of California, San Diego
Starting and developing a CURE in a community college
Tamara Mans, North Hennepin Community College
Towards developing vertically-integrated CUREs at University of Detroit Mercy
Mara Livezey, University of Detroit Mercy
CUREs as a bridge to interdisciplinary collaborations at a PUI
Dwight Williams, Kalamazoo College
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Structural biology interest group

Chairs: Jennifer Kavran, Johns Hopkins University, and David Taylor, University of Texas at Austin

This interest group is aimed at building a community of researchers in the Structural Biology field.

The program will highlight both emerging areas in structural biology as well as early career scientists covering new techniques including cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET), and COVID-19 research. In addition, a panel discussion focused on providing resources for trainees (graduate students and postdocs) will be included.

Target audience: Life science researchers and structural biologists of all levels.

Continue the conversation on the interest group Slack channel: #asbmb-structural-biology-interest-group

Replenishing the ends: Structure mechanism of human telomerase
Kelly Nguyen, Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology
SARS2 Nsp15 and its search for U
Robin Stanley, National Institute of Environmental and Health Sciences
Rapid structural insights into SARS-CoV-2 S enabled by cryo-EM
Daniel Wrapp, University of Texas, Austin
Endogenous structural biology approaches for challenging systems
Mimi Ho, Columbia University
Cryo-EM structure of the human mRNA translation initiation complex
Jailson Querido, Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology
The in situ structure of Parkinson’s disease-linked LRRK2
Elizabeth Villa, University of California, San Diego
11:00 AM - 1:00 PM

Structural biology interest group — Membrane proteins

Chairs: Fran Barrera, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and Matthias Buck, Case Western Reserve University

The goal of this interest group is to build a community of researchers in the field of structural biology.

The study of membrane proteins is living a golden era, as strides are being made towards understanding how these key proteins function. This networking event will highlight recent advances in a broad range of membrane proteins that are central players in key cellular processes. Topics covered will include cryogenic electron microscopy structures of membrane proteins, particularly receptors and transporters. Other cutting-edge techniques will include several modalities of single-molecule methods. 

Target audience: Researchers interested in biochemistry, biophysics and structural biology.

Continue the conversation on the interest group Slack channel: #asbmb-structural-biology-interest-group

Ras activation in protein condensates
Jay Groves, University of California, Berkeley
Lipid/detergent properties and membrane mimics
Linda Columbus, University of Virginia
Probing the dynamics of lipid-anchored proteins using molecular simulations and experiments
Alex Gorfe, University of Texas Health
Activation mechanisms and biased signaling of the G protein-coupled receptor β2AR
Rajan Lamichhane, University of Tennessee
Protein design reveals roles of transient water wires in proton channel function
Huong Kratochvil, University of California, San Francisco
Gating mechanism in pentameric ligand gated channels: Insights from Cryo-EM
Sudha Chakrapani, Case Western Reserve University
Protein and membrane conformations facilitating virus entry into cells
Lukas Tamm, Virginia University
11:00 AM - 2:00 PM

RNA interest group — RNA virology

Chairs: Blanton Tolbert, Case Western Reserve University, and Sebla Kutluay, Washington University in St. Louis

The goal of this interest group is to build a community of researchers in the field of RNA virology.

This interest group event will bring together scientists who are generally interested in the cellular stages of the replication cycle of RNA viruses but pursue these endeavors using different experimental approaches. The format will encourage cross-talk between those inclined to understand mechanisms by employing structural biochemistry and those individuals who focus more on the cellular stages of molecular virology. Attendees will learn from a group of scientists who approach understanding virus–host pathways from different scientific and technological approaches and the identification of new host-virus pathways to pursue for therapeutic intervention. 

Target audience: Researchers at all career levels.

Continue the conversation on the interest group Slack channel: #asbmb-rna-interest-group

Discovering and modulating RNA regulatory elements within the SARS-CoV-2 and HCV genomes
Anna Marie Pyle, Yale University
Viral RNAs in 3D: Master hijackers of cellular machinery
Jeffrey Kieft, University of Colorado Anshutz Medical Campus
An RNA pseudoknot stimulated HTLV-1 pro-pol programmed -1 ribosomal frameshift
Kathryn Mouzakis, Loyola Marymount University
Establishing a framework to understand mechanisms of action of drugs targeting the picornaviral 2C protein
Calvin Yeager, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Structural modulation of the interaction between EV71 3C protease and stem loop 1D
Christina Haddad, Case Western Reserve University
Generation and function of defective viral genomes during RSV infection
Carolina Lopez, Washington University in St. Louis
RNA modifications at the virus-host interface
Stacy Horner, Duke University
Functional genomics studies of SARS-CoV-2 and three seasonal human coronaviruses
Joseph Luna, Rockefeller University
Translational regulation of HIV-1 and SARS-CoV-2 infections
Maritza Puray-Chavez, Washington University in St. Louis
Elucidating HIV splice variant interactomes using HyPR-MS 
Rachel Knoener, University of Wisconsin–Madison
11:00 AM - 2:00 PM

Neuroscience interest group — Protein function in the nervous system

Chairs: Jason Yi and Harrison Gabel, Washington University in St. Louis

The goal of this interest group is to promote biochemical and molecular biology research in neuroscience and foster communication between mechanistic biochemical researchers and neuroscientists throughout the global research community.

The session will explore how a basic, mechanistic understanding of proteins can translate into new insights into nervous system function, disease, and evolution. The talks in this interest group will emphasize studies that perform mechanistic analyses of single proteins and enzymes in the context of nervous system function, and in particular, how these studies provide new insights into neurological disorders and potential treatments.

This interest group will provide an opportunity for trainees to network with researchers outside their current fields to facilitate career development.

Target audience: Molecular neuroscientists and those interested in learning more about neuroscience research.

Continue the conversation on the interest group Slack channel: #asbmb-neuroscience-interest-group

Angela Mabb, Georgia State University
Jiami Guo, University of Calgary
Victor Anggono, Queensland Brain Institute
Shigeki Iwase, University of Michigan
Harrison Gabel, Washington University in St. Louis
Jason Yi, Washington University in St. Louis
1:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Glycobiology interest group

Chairs: Amanda Lewis, University of California, San Diego Health, and Nadine Samara, National Institutes of Health

This interest group is aimed at building a community of researchers in the field of glycobiology.

The program will include discussions addressing problems associated with a lack of diversity, equity and inclusion in science, and glycoscience in particular; provide mental health advice/resources; and cover cutting-edge research in the field. Attendees will engage in discussions following the scientific talks and learn about the career path of a prominent glycobiologist at the FDA, Dr. Willie Vann.

Target audience: Researchers in glycosciences at all levels, leaders interested in building equity, diversity and inclusion in the glycosciences and early career researchers interested in learning strategies to manage mental health challenges.

Continue the conversation on the interest group Slack channel: #asbmb-glycobiology-interest-group

Developing microbiome-directed foods: A journey from gnotobiotic mouse models to humans
Omar Delannoy-Bruno, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine
Sialidases and sialoglycan foraging in dysbiotic vaginal microbiota
Kavita Agarwal, University of California, San Diego
Improved glycopeptide identification using high-field asymmetric waveform mobility spectrometry (FAIMS)
Kathirvel Alagesan, Max Planck Institute
O-GlcNAcylation in the pituitary gland: From development to endocrine function
Stephanie Olivier-Van Stichelen, Medical College of Wisconsin
The Acinetobacter glycoprotease CpaA, a new component of the glycoproteomics toolbox
Mario Feldman, Washington University in St. Louis
Following a sweet trail – My career path at FDA
Willie Vann, United States Food and Drug Administration
Wellness & resilience – Underappreciated skills for scientists
Sharon Milgram, National Institutes of Health
Strategies to combat bias and discrimination in STEM
Lisa Willis, University of Alberta
1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Lipid Research Division interest group — Lipid and membrane biochemistry

Chairs: John Burke, University of Victoria, and Mike Airola, Stony Brook Medicine

The goal of this interest group is to continue to engage the lipid community.

Attendees will learn about exciting lipid and membrane research.

Target audience: Biochemists and biologists who are interested in lipid and membrane research.

Continue the conversation on the interest group Slack channel: #asbmb-lipid-research-division-interest-group

Phosphorylation switches on inter-organelle contacts and lipid transport
Fabien Alpy, Institute of Genetics and Molecular and Cellular Biology
Structure and mechanism of TRAPPIII-mediated Rab1 activation
Aaron Joiner, Cornell University
The C-terminal regulatory motif in PI3Kgamma and its implications in disease and inhibition
Manoj Rathinaswamy, University of Victoria
Filovirus matrix protein VP40 displays lipid-specific behavior and oligomerization that go beyond the lipid headgroup
Souad Amiar, Purdue University
1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Enzymology interest group

Chairs: Kayunta Johnson-Winters, University of Texas at Arlington, and Juan Mendoza, University of Chicago

The goal of this interest group is to build a community of researchers in the field of enzymology.

This interest group event will provide an in-depth and multi-level view of how the structural studies of enzymes elucidate essential cellular functions. The enzymes covered are important at the inner core of a cell through the cell's surface such as cell surface receptors. The research to be presented will be focused on the structure-function of enzymes essential to cellular function, cellular regulation, and relevant to human health and disease. Techniques and cutting-edge research include X-ray crystallography, cryo-EM, NMR, enzyme kinetics, enzymology, and protein engineering.

Attendees will be exposed to a diverse panel of researchers performing cutting-edge science and gain insights into how some scientists use combined structure and engineering approaches to elucidate key enzymatic processes of cells. New investigators will also leave with insight related to their careers and respective fields through a Q&A session related to research, diversity, inclusion and promotion.

Target audience: researchers at all career levels with an interest in structure, enzymology, and human health and disease.

Continue the conversation on the interest group Slack channel: #asbmb-enzymology-interest-group

Tunnels for lipid transport across the bacterial cell envelope
Gira Bhabha, New York University School of Medicine Skirball Institute
A kinase-dependent phosphoswitch controls human circadian timekeeping
Carrie Partch, University of California, Santa Cruz
Seeing red – a cytochrome c is the natural electron acceptor for nicotine oxidoreductase
Frederick Stull, Western Michigan University
Control of protein function by assembly: implications for stress response
Breann L. Brown, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Signaling interest group — Nuclear receptors

Chairs: Rebecca Riggins, Georgetown University, and Douglas Kojetin, Scripps Research Institute

This interest group is intended to bring together members of the scientific community who study nuclear receptors, which are critically important players in normal and disease physiology.

Nuclear receptors with well-established connections to specific diseases (e.g. the estrogen and androgen receptors in breast and prostate cancer, respectively) are often highlighted in spotlight sessions at major meetings, or the subjects of entirely independent conferences. However, the nuclear receptor field as a whole lacks a meeting venue that allows the cross-pollination of innovative ideas and conceptual advances drawn from the study of the lesser-known orphan nuclear receptors to these steroid hormone receptors, and back again.

Attendees will be able to connect with each other during the interest group event and throughout the main ASBMB meeting, with the idea that this will nucleate longer-term networking and collaborative opportunities.

Target audience: Researchers at all career levels who are already active in the nuclear receptor field, and those who are interested in moving towards this research area.

Continue the conversation on the interest group Slack channel: #asbmb-signaling-interest-group

Hormone receptor 4 is required in muscles and distinct ovarian cell types to regulate specific steps of Drosophila oogenesis
Lesley N. Weaver, Indiana University
Insane in the membrane: The role of membrane steroid receptors in embryonic development
Daniel A. Gorelick, Baylor College of Medicine
Artifacts, crystals, and other treasures: A quest for the structural basis of heme-dependent REV-ERBbeta activity
Sarah A. Mosure, Scripps Institute, Florida
Discovery of oleic acid as an endogenous ligand of TLX/Nr2E1 and a biomarker of neurogenesis
Miriana Maletic-Savatic, Baylor College of Medicine
Dynamic regulation of ligand-activated transcriptional programs and chromatin architecture by nuclear receptor condensates
Sreejith J. Nair, University of California, San Diego
2:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Chemical biology interest group

Chairs: Minkui Luo, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and Jianmin Gao, Boston College

This interest group is aimed at building a community of researchers in the field of chemical biology.

This interest group is assembled for collaborative, synergistic interaction of attendees with significant portion of the program for underrepresented, junior-level faculty members. This interest group can be of a great platform for ASBMB biologists to be exposed to emerging chemical biology tools, technology and methods. There are also existing chemical biology challenges that ASBMB biologists can collaboratively address with the aim for a group of core participants to potentially establish an annual meeting program. The ultimate goal is to inspire chemical biologists to mingle with the ASBMB community for mutual benefits: the utility of chemical tools to interrogate challenging biology and the advancement of novel biological discovery with chemical tools.

Target audience: Chemist biologists (likely first-time ASBMB attendees) with interest in searching for biological questions; the current ASBMB members with interest in chemical biology to develop tools or solve their existing problem.

Continue the conversation on the interest group Slack channel: #asbmb-chemical-biology-interest-group

Raymond Moellering, University of Chicago
Uncovering cancer-associated epigenetic events using novel chemical tools
Yael David, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
Directed evolution of reverse transcriptases to study epitranscriptomics and RNA biology
Huiqing (Jane) Zhou, Boston College
Single-molecule studies of genetic and epigenetic machinery
Shixin Liu, Rockefeller University
Chemical biology of protein aggregation in membraneless organelles and the stressed proteome
Xin Zhang, Pennsylvania State University
Chemical tools that IMPACT lipid signaling
Jeremy Baskin, Cornell University
Methods to monitor an increase in proteasome activity in live cells
Darci Trader, Purdue University
2:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Protein interest group — Post-translational modifications

Chairs: Lauren Ball, Medical University of South Carolina, and Fangliang Zhang, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

The goal of this interest group is to provide a forum enabling interaction of scientists interested in the elucidating the impact of regulatory post-translational modifications on physiology, disease and drug response.

Novel approaches for enrichment and detection of PTMs including (nanopore, antibody) and detection methodology (mass spectrometry) and introduction to less well explored PTMs (examples: non-acetyl acylation, sulfation, arginylation) and their relevance to physiology and disease will be covered.

Target audience: Research scientists, physicians, postdoctoral fellows, graduate and undergraduate students.

Continue the conversation on the interest group Slack channel: #asbmb-protein-interest-group-

Nanopores for single molecule protein sequencing and PTM detection
Aleksei Aksimentiev, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Pathological variation of collagen proline hydroxylation in the tumor microenvironment detected by imaging mass spectrometry
Peggi Angel, Medical University of South Carolina
Modulation of innate immunity by succination
Kate A. Fitzgerald, University of Massachusetts Medical School
Role of arginine methyltransferase 5 in AKT signaling
Wenjian Gan, Medical University of South Carolina
Ubiquitination modulates protein energetics and degradation kinetics in a site-specific manner
Andreas Martin, University of California, Berkeley
A new strategy for the enrichment and quantitation of native O-GlcNAc modified peptides from cells and tissues
Sam Myers, La Jolla Institute for Immunology
BOOSTing quantitative phosphotyrosine proteomics and beyond
Arthur Salomon, Brown University
Protein arginylation: An ancient and conserved oxygen sensing mechanism
Fangliang Zhang, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine
3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Signaling interest group — Triple negative breast and ovarian cancers

Chairs: Marina Holz, New York Medical College, and Mythreye Karthikeyan, University of Alabama at Birmingham

This interest group is aimed at building a community of researchers in the field of signaling–cancers.

The program will cover engaging talks on current topics and innovative approaches to study cellular communication, including metabolic signaling, cancer cell signaling and stress response. Special emphasis will be on advanced approaches to study and manipulate signal transduction, including high-throughput methods, single molecule imaging, and quantitative modeling. Attendees will be exposed to the most recent developments in the field and will have an opportunity to interact with speakers and with each other.

Target audience: Researchers at all career stages interested in the topic.

Continue the conversation on the interest group Slack channel: #asbmb-signaling-interest-group

Alternative transcription factor targets for high grade serous cancer and TNBC other than ER/PR
Joanna E. Burdette, University of Illinois
Plasticity of telomere maintenance mechanisms during mammary tumorigenesis
William P. Schiemann, Case Western Reserve University
TNBC and serous ovarian cancers co-opt a program of immune suppression utilized by fetal trophoblasts
Jennifer K. Richer, University of Colorado
Comparison of ovarian cancer and triple-negative breast cancer tumors at the signaling level using multi-omics data
Jason McDermott, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Tuesday agenda

9:30 AM - 10:00 AM

ASBMB president welcome address and business meeting

10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Herbert Tabor Research Award lecture

Structural basis of dystroglycan function and the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy
Kevin Campbell, University of Iowa
10:30 AM - 11:00 AM

ASBMB–Merck Award lecture

Cellular machineries devoted to rubisco — the most abundant enzyme
Manajit Hayer-Hartl, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry
11:00 AM - 11:15 AM

Break/Networking

Visit posters and exhibits and network with colleagues!

11:15 AM - 1:00 PM

Cell decision making

Lifelong analysis of key aging genes as determinants of lifespan in C. elegans
Adriana San Miguel, North Carolina State University
Nuclear mechanics in migrating cells
Tanmay Lele, University of Florida Chair
Clocks, hourglasses and history-dependent clocks
Arvind Murugan, University of Chicago
11:15 AM - 1:30 PM

Glycosylation and extracellular matrix in development, repair and cancer

TGF-beta regulation by the matricellular protein thrombospondin 1
Joanne Murphy-Ullrich, University of Alabama at Birmingham Chair
Role of O-linked fucose-glucose disaccharide modification of thrombospondin type I repeats during protein folding and embryo development
Bernadette Holdener, Stony Brook University
Are fibrillin–notch interactions important in development and disease?
Lynn Sakai, Oregon Health and Science University
A genetic approach to display and dissect the cancer-associated O-glycoepitome
Henrik Clausen, University of Copenhagen
11:15 AM - 1:00 PM

Mechanosignaling

Piezo1 activation gains traction
Medha Pathak, University of California, Irvine
Mechanotransduction in vascular health and disease
Martin Schwartz, Yale University
Mechanical force and notch signaling
Wendy Gordon, University of Minnesota Chair
Mechanisms linking mechanotransduction and cell metabolism
Kris DeMali, University of Iowa
11:15 AM - 1:00 PM

Molecular machines: New paradigms in structure, function and engineering

Chair: Stefanie Redemann, University of Virginia

Activation of the exocyst tethering complex for SNARE complex regulation and membrane fusion
Mary Munson, University of Massachusetts Medical School
Sugary coats: Synthesis and secretion of extracellular polysaccharides
Jochen Zimmer, University of Virginia School of Medicine
Autophagy initiation
James Hurley, University of California, Berkeley
HiFi molecular transmission via crisscross cooperativity
William Shih, Harvard University
11:15 AM - 1:00 PM

NAD synthesis, salvage and sirtuins in tissue health

Chair: Anne Murphy, Cytokinetics, Inc.

Viral infection-mediated control of NAD metabolism
Charles Brenner, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne
Mitochondrial NAD transport
Joseph A. Baur, University of Pennsylvania
Chromatin regulation and genome maintenance by mammalian SIRT6 and SIRT7
Katrin F. Chua, Stanford University and VA Palo Alto Health Care System
Systemic NAD+ deficiency in mitochondrial muscle disease is treatable by niacin
Anu Suomalainen Wartiovaara, University of Helsinki
11:15 AM - 1:00 PM

Noncoding RNAs and disease

tRNA: Splicing and subcellular dynamics
Anita Hopper, Ohio State University Chair
The role of tRNA derived small RNAs in gene regulation in normal tissues and cancer
Mark Kay, Stanford University
The Piwi-piRNA pathway: A new paradigm in gene regulation
Haifan Lin, Yale University
3’ end processing and turnover of piRNAs
Wen Tang, Ohio State University
11:15 AM - 1:00 PM

Novel roles of lipids in health and disease

Chair: Steven Claypool, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

BSCL2/Seipin in lipid catabolism and lipodystrophy
Weiqin Chen, Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University
Structural insights into the regulation of human serine palmitoyltransferase complexes
Chia-Hsueh Lee, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
Tissue-specific roles of cardiolipin in the control of systemic energy homeostasis
Zachary Gerhart-Hines, University of Copenhagen
SPTLC1 mutations associated with early onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
Teresa Dunn–Giroux, Uniformed Services University
11:15 AM - 1:00 PM

Who we are: Creating a culture of wellness in science

Chair: Daniel Dries, Juniata College

Preventing and overcoming harassment
Alex Helman, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine
An asset-based approach to advancing Latina students in STEM; increasing resilience, participation and success
Elsa Gonzalez, University of Houston
Promoting mental well-being
Nathan Vanderford, University of Kentucky
Mentorship best practices
Joanne Kamens, Addgene
1:00 PM - 1:45 PM

Break/Networking

Visit posters and exhibits and network with colleagues!

1:15 PM - 1:45 PM

Meet the experts

Continue the conversation with leading experts from today's symposia and award lectures.

  • Adriana San Miguel, North Carolina State University
  • Alex Helman, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine
  • Anita Hopper, Ohio State University
  • Arvind Murugan, University of Chicago
  • Bernadette Holdener, Stony Brook University
  • Elsa Gonzalez, University of Houston
  • Haifan Lin, Yale University
  • Henrik Clausen, University of Copenhagen
  • James Hurley, University of California, Berkeley
  • Joanne Kamens, Addgene
  • Joanne Murphy-Ullrich, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Jochem Zimmer, University of Virginia School of Medicine
  • Katrin Chua, Stanford University and VA Palo Alto Health Care System
  • Kris DeMali, University of Iowa
  • Lynn Sakai, Oregon Health and Science University
  • Mark Kay, Stanford University
  • Martin Schwartz, Yale University
  • Mary Munson, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Medha Pathak, University of California, Irvine
  • Mikiko Siomi, University of Tokyo
  • Nathan Vanderford, University of Kentucky
  • Polly Fordyce, Stanford University
  • Tanmay Lele, University of Florida
  • Teresa Dunn-Giroux, Uniformed Services University
  • Weiqin Chen, Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University
  • Wendy Gordon, University of Minnesota
  • William Shih, Harvard University
  • Zachary Gerhart-Hines, University of Copenhagen
1:45 PM - 3:00 PM

Glycans in disease

Exostosin-like 2 abrogation promotes heparan sulfate biosynthesis and switches cancer cell signalling towards an invasive phenotype
Catarina Marques, i3S - Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde, Universidade do Porto
Increased expression of chondroitin sulfotransferases and proteoglycans follows AngII and may help explain pathophysiology underlying COVID-19 respiratory failure
Joanne Tobacman, University of Illinois at Chicago and Jesse Brown VAMC
Evaluation of lectin staining biomarkers in skeletal muscle of patients with GNE myopathy
Kelly Crowe, Mount St. Joseph University
Changes in the brain extracellular matrix sulfation code in Alzheimer's disease
Kimberly Alonge, University of Washington Chair
Systems-based analysis of the pancreatic cancer-specific glycome reveals ST6GAL1 as a driver of human and murine disease
Shuhui Chen, New York University
1:45 PM - 3:00 PM

Lipids and membranes

Disordered region in PI3K regulatory subunit p85 drives clathrin-dependent endocytosis and regulates cell motility
Hideaki Matsubayashi, Johns Hopkins University
Structure and mechanism of Staphylococcus aureus oleate hydratase (OhyA)
Christopher Radka, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
Roles of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation in phosphatidic acid phosphatase membrane interaction
Joanna Kwiatek, Rutgers University Chair
1:45 PM - 3:00 PM

Metabolism: Lifespan and ketosis

Glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatase/PGP: A novel dietary restriction mimetic enzyme that protects from glucotoxicity and prolongs healthspan in C. elegans
Elite Possik, University of Montréal
Lipocalin 2 deficiency diminishes the metabolic effect of ketogenic diet in female mice
Tayler Floyd, University Of Minnesota
Chromatin remodeling and mitochondrial biogenesis underlie the improved cardiac function in heart failure induced by ketogenic diet and beta-hydroxibutiyrate supplementation
Gaetano Santulli, Albert Einstein College of Medicine Chair
Differential metabolism of octanoate by liver, heart and muscle and the failure of dietary octanoate to rescue mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid oxidation-deficient cardiac hypertrophy
Andrea Pereyra, East Carolina University Chair
Metabolism of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids modulates healthspan of C. elegans
Kin Sing Stephen Lee, Michigan State University
1:45 PM - 3:00 PM

Molecular mechanisms of signal transduction and cellular regulation

Isoform-selective regulation of Akt1 and Akt2 by interdomain interaction
Xin Zhou, University of California, San Diego
Coiled coil control of diverse EGFR functions
Deepto Mozumdar, Yale University
Promoting receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase activity by targeting transmembrane domain interactions
Damien Thévenin, Lehigh University Chair
Elucidating the impact of betaglycan glycosaminoglycan chain modification on ectodomain shedding and cell signaling in ovarian cancer
Alex Choi, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Sustained O-GlcNAcylation causes ERK signal and APP amplification
Sophiya John Ephrame, University of Kansas Medical Center
1:45 PM - 3:00 PM

Non-coding RNAs

Understanding the role of bulge-length dependent RNA stacking energetics in determining HIV-1 TAR-Tat peptide binding energetics in vitro and in cells
Megan Kelly, Duke University
High throughput mapping miRNA-glycogenevintercomes
Thu Chu, University of Alberta
Exosomes from vascular smooth muscle cells of diabetic origin promote a pro-inflammatory macrophage phenotype
Ryan Braun, Tulane University
Structure-function studies of MUNC LncRNA reveal domains required for its promyogenic phenotype
Roza Przanowska, University of Virginia
A putative long noncoding RNA-encoded micropeptide maintains cellular homeostasis in pancreatic β-cells
Fan Shao, University of Iowa Chair
1:45 PM - 3:00 PM

Regulation and dynamics of protein synthesis

The sensor IRE1 couples stress detection to protein synthesis
Daniela Ricci, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Teamwork makes the dream work: A cyanobacterial RNA helicase is regulated by multiple cis-regulatory elements in response to low temperature
Logan Brand, University of Alberta
eIF2B conformation and assembly state regulate the integrated stress response
Michael Schoof, University of California, San Francisco
mTORC1 activity occurs predominantly in the periphery of human skeletal muscle fibers following anabolic stimuli
Nathan Hodson, University of Toronto Chair
High resolution ribosome profiling reveals gene-specific details of UGA re-coding in selenoproteins
Simon Bohleber, University of Bonn
1:45 PM - 3:00 PM

RNA binding proteins

Intrinsically disordered electronegative clusters improve stability and binding specificity of RNA-bindingproteins
Jun Zhang, University of Alabama at Birmingham Chair
Evaluating the role of RNA binding protein CELF2 in modulating immune cells in co
Afreen Sayed, University of Kansas Medical Center
Binding of eukaryotic initiation factor 3 (eIF3) to Barley Yellow Dwarf Virus (BYDV) untranslated regions (UTRs)
Paul Powell, Hunter College
IGF2BP1/IMP1 regulates translation of autophagy protein LC3 downstream of mTOR in intestinal epithelial cell
Patrick Williams, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Role of bridge helix in mediating DNA recognition and efficient cleavage by CRISPR-Cas12a
Hari Parameshwaran, University of Oklahoma
1:45 PM - 3:00 PM

RNA: Processing, transport and regulatory mechanisms

RNase L promotes the formation of unique ribonucleoprotein granules distinct from stress
James Burke, University of Colorado, Boulder Chair
A phase-separating molecular tether for lariat debranching enzyme is defective in non-photosensitive trichothiodystrophy
Brittany Townley, Washington University in St. Louis
Two isoforms of Eya3 influence muscle cell differentiation and become dysregulated in striated muscle diseases
Hannah Wiedner, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Unintended consequences of innate immune activation by coronaviruses
Noel-Marie Plonski, Kent State University
Biophysical characterization and computational modeling of histone mRNA degradation intermediates
Morgan Shine, Westminster College
1:45 PM - 3:00 PM

Structure-function of DNA metabolism and telomerase

Chair: Melissa Mefford
High-throughput characterization of VDJ recombination signal sequences
Walker Hoolehan, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
Molecular contacts and kinetic control within the replisome maintain coupled DNA unwinding and synthesis
Himasha Perera, Baylor University
Distinct roles of the mitochondrial DNA helicase twinkle in drosophila neurons and muscles
Ana Paula Rodrigues, Sao Paulo State University
Telomerase reactivation in aggressive cancer cells: Non-duplex structure formation is key to the epigenetic state of the telomerase promoter
Shalu Sharma, CSIR—Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology
The coordination between DNA polymerase and ligase governs the formation of mutagenic repair intermediates as an important determinant of faithful base excision repair
Melike Caglayan, University of Florida
1:45 PM - 3:00 PM

JBC Herbert Tabor Early Career Investigator Awards

The Journal of Biological Chemistry honors first authors

Chairs: George DeMartino, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and Lila Gierasch, University of Massachusetts

A low-potential terminal oxidase associated with the iron-only nitrogenase from the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii
Febin Varghese, Imperial College London
Phosphorylation of HSP90 by protein kinase A is essential for the nuclear translocation of androgen receptor
Manisha Dagar, Amity Institute of Biotechnology
Ribosome profiling of selenoproteins in vivo reveals consequences of pathogenic Secisbp2 missense mutations
Wenchao Zhao, University of Bonn
Dihydronicotinamide riboside is a potent NAD+ concentration enhancer in vitro and in vivo
Yue Yang, Weill Cornell Medicine
The roses can stop and smell you too: Transcriptional regulators involved in responses to volatile organic compounds in plants
Ayumi Nagashima-Kasahara, Tokyo Institute of Technology
3:00 PM - 3:15 PM

Break/Networking

Visit posters and exhibits and network with colleagues!

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM

Poster discussions

Attend a discussion group to continue the conversation with poster presenters about their research.

Topics
  • BMB education and professional development — Moderators: Caitlin Cridland and Michael Davis
  • Cancer signaling and therapeutics — Moderators: Gauri Shishodia and Sharavan Ramachandran
  • DNA metabolism and replication — Moderators: Pratibha Ghodke and Amit Ketkar
  • Enzyme structure and dynamics, regulation and allosterism — Moderators: Alex Meier and Matt Coban
  • G proteins, kinases, apoptosis, tumor suppressors — Moderators: Ruta Jog and Nada Abo El-Magd
  • Lipids, membranes and inflammation — Moderators: Roberto Espinoza Corral and Kiran-Kumar Shivaiah
  • Membrane proteins, lipid domains, vesicle trafficking — Moderators: Vanessa Veilleux and Carolyn Highland
  • Metabolism, bioenergetics and oxidative stress — Moderators: Ramona D'Amico and Savannah Berry
  • Metabolomics, computational biology and bioinformatics — Moderators: Balaji Moorthy and Cullen Horstmann
  • Microbiomes, microbe/Parasite–host signaling — Moderators: Anne Harbig and Ashutosh Arun
  • Protein engineering and small molecule interactions, nanotech — Moderators: Stephanie Diaz and Mona Al-Mugotir
  • Protein modification and intrinsically disordered proteins — Moderators: Deepika Nambiar and Victoria Lineva
  • Protein structure and biophysics — Moderators: Amita Sahoo and Guangning Zong
  • Protein synthesis, structure and modifications — Moderators: Mikhail Atroshchenko and Prasanthi Koganti
  • RNA processing and binding proteins — Moderators: Gabrielle Gentile and Thomas Whitlow
  • Signal transduction and cellular regulation — Moderators: Clair Anliker and Harshada Ketkar
5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

Women in BMB event — Painful and important lessons about resilience and wellness for scientists

Sponsored by Women in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Committee

Chair: Susan Baserga, Yale University

Featured speaker: Sharon Milgram, Director of Intramural Training & Education, National Institutes of Health

Panelists:
Patty Kane, SUNY Upstate Medical University
Marilee Benore, University of Michigan Dearborn
Karen Allen, Boston University
Kelly Ten Hagen, National Institutes of Health

Wednesday agenda

10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

William C. Rose Award lecture

Constraining evolution → avoiding drug resistance: Lessons from viruses
Celia Schiffer, University of Massachusetts Medical School,
10:30 AM - 11:00 AM

Mildred Cohn Award in Biological Chemistry lecture

Toolbox to evaluate biological function of histone deacetylases
Carol Fierke, Texas A&M University
11:00 AM - 11:30 AM

Earl and Thressa Stadtman Young Scholar Award lecture

Wiring the powerhouse: Systems-to-structure approaches for defining mitochondrial protein function
David Pagliarini, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine
11:30 AM - 11:45 AM

Break/Networking

Visit posters and exhibits and network with colleagues!

11:45 AM - 1:30 PM

Computational approaches to regulation of gene expression

Leveraging microfluidics for high-throughput studies of transcription factor/DNA binding
Polly Fordyce, Stanford University Chair
Designing and building a synthetic yeast genome
Joel S. Bader, Johns Hopkins University
Neal Devaraj, University of California, San Diego
11:45 AM - 1:30 PM

Control of cell fate by metabolic intermediates

Chair: Carla Koehler, University of California, Los Angeles

Microbiome catabolites as novel modulators of cellular glucose and energy metabolism
Gary Williamson, Monash University
Metabolic modulation of cardiac health: The role of glucose and amino acids
Rong Tian, University of Washington
Control of macrophage activation by coenzyme A
Ajit Divakaruni, University of California, Los Angeles
A quantitative tissue-specific landscape of protein redox regulation during aging
Edward Chouchani, Harvard University
11:45 AM - 1:30 PM

Glycosylation and extracellular matrix in immunologic, inflammatory and infectious disease

Decoding inflammatory signals from the extracellular matrix for the development of new immunotherapies
Kim S. Midwood, University of Oxford Chair
Glycosylation in a common mechanism of colitis and sepsis
Jamey Marth, Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute
Genome wide analysis of heparan sulfate assembly
Jeffrey D. Esko, University of California, San Diego
PAMPs, DAMPs and SAMPs: Host glycans are self-associated molecular patterns, but subject to microbial molecular mimicry
Ajit Varki, University of California, San Diego
11:45 AM - 1:30 PM

How lipids impact the structure and function of membrane proteins

Membrane proteins — the lipid connection
Carol Robinson, University of Oxford
Structural basis of lipid scrambling and ion conduction by TMEM16 scramblases
Alessio Accardi, Weill Cornell Medical College
Structural insights into TRPV channel gating
Vera Moiseenkova-Bell, University of Pennsylvania
Cardiolipin-dependent carriers
Steven Claypool, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Chair
11:45 AM - 1:30 PM

Molecular motors

Chair: Jochen Zimmer, University of Virginia

Integrated 3D tomography and computational modeling to study forces in metaphase spindles
Stefanie Redemann, University of Virginia School of Medicine
Single molecule biophysics
Carlos Bustamante, University of California, Berkeley
Myosin: Structure, function, regulation and disease
Michelle Peckham, University of Leeds
Watching a fine-tuned molecular machine at work: Structural and functional studies of the 26S proteasome
Andreas Martin, University of California, Berkeley
11:45 AM - 1:30 PM

Post-translational modifications/signaling

Getting hedgehogs where they need to go: Cleavage activates dispatched for sonic hedgehog release
Stacey Ogden, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
Rhomboid proteins in cell signaling
Matthew Freeman, University of Oxford
Lipids and hedgehogs
Adrian Salic, Harvard University Medical School Chair
Role of notch glycoslation in signaling
Pamela Stanley, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
11:45 AM - 1:30 PM

RNA modifications and disease

RNA modification in cancer
Jianjun Chen, Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope
RNA modifications in health and disease
Tsutomu Suzuki, University of Tokyo
mRNA and tRNA dance to the beat of methylations
Kathy Liu, University of Pennsylvania
tRNA quality control: Mechanisms, evolution and implications for human disease
Eric Phizicky, University of Rochester Medical Center Chair
11:45 AM - 1:30 PM

What we do: Choosing pedagogy over content

Chair: Nathan Vanderford, University of Kentucky

Grand challenges: building interdisciplinary communities to tackle complex global issues
Jodi Schwarz, Vassar College
Teaching biochemistry in context
Daniel Dries, Juniata College
Using narrative in STEM education
Reneta Lansiquot, New York City College of Technology
Reimagining STEM education to help underrepresented students thrive in the classroom
Shannon Z. Jones, University of Richmond
1:30 PM - 2:15 PM

Break/Networking

Visit posters and exhibits and network with colleagues!

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

Meet the experts

Continue the conversation with leading experts from today's symposia and award lectures.

  • Adrian Salic, Harvard University Medical School
  • Ajit Divakaruni, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Ajit Varki, University of California, San Diego
  • Alessio Accardi, Weill Cornell Medical College
  • Andreas Martin, University of California, Berkeley
  • Carol Robinson, University of Oxford
  • Carols Bustamante, University of California, Berkeley
  • Daniel Dries, Juniata College
  • Edward Chouchani, Harvard University
  • Eric Phizicky, University of Rochester Medical Center
  • Jamey Marth, Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute
  • Jeffrey Esko, University of California, San Diego
  • Jodi Schwarz, Vassar College
  • Kathy Liu, University of Pennsylvania
  • Kim Midwood, University of Oxford
  • David Pagliarini, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine
  • Michelle Peckham, University of Leeds
  • Pamela Stanley, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
  • Reneta Lansiquot, New York City College of Technology
  • Rong Tian, University of Washington
  • Shannon Jones, University of Richmond
  • Stacey Ogden, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
  • Steven Claypool, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
  • Vera Moiseenkova-Bell, University of Pennsylvania
  • William Petri, University of Virginia
2:15 PM - 3:30 PM

Chemical biology and drug discovery

Development of novel bexarotene analogs for treating cutaneous T-cell lymphomas
Ankedo Warda, University of Arizona College of Medicine — Phoenix
A high throughput screen for TMPRSS2 expression identifies FDA-approved and clinically advanced compounds that can limit SARS-CoV-2 entry
Travis Lear, University of Pittsburgh Chair
Stem cells from the amniotic fluid: a promising tool to face the cytokine storm associated to SARS-CoV-2 infections
Salvatore Vaiasicca, Università Politecnica delle Marche
Sequence effects and ligand selectivity in targeting non-canonical DNA structures
Marc Rodriguez, Texas State University
Targeting the brain's astrocytes using diverse small molecule cargo
Danielle Cervasio, Stony Brook University
2:15 PM - 3:30 PM

Enzyme mechanisms, kinetics and dynamics

Structure of the ATP-free Mre11-Rad50 DNA damage repair complex bound to DNA substrates
Chuan Liang,
Insight into the maturation process of the nitrile hydratase active site
Irene Ogutu, Colorado School of Mines Chair
Kinetic characterization of proline utilization A (PutA) using proline analogues
Yizi Mao, University of Nebraska–Lincoln
Kinetic analysis of F420-dependent NADP+ oxidoreductase (Fno) variants reveal interrupted inner subunit communication
Juan Corrales, University of Texas at Arlington
Mechanistic studies on F420-dependent glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase using kinetic isotope effect methods and pH profiles
Ana Alvarex, University of Texas at Arlington
2:15 PM - 3:30 PM

Extracellular matrix and cell signaling

Vinculin tension and YAP activation are altered in dystrophic muscle cells
Maria Paz Ramirez, University of Minnesota
Differential engagement of the integrin binding domain of fibronectin impacts fibroblast behavior
Leandro Moretti, Uniersity of Virginia
Molecular orchestration of epithelial mesenchymal transition during trophoblast and placental development
Sarbani Saha, CSIR–Indian Institute of Chemical Biology
Upregulation of IGSF3 expression by iron chelation leads to the inhibition of epithelial cell proliferation
Kelly Schweitzer, National Jewish Health
2:15 PM - 3:30 PM

From microbiome to antibiotics

Acetyl metabolite toxicity impacts bacillus subtilis cell growth and development
Brian Best, Northeastern University
Localization of two interacting protein components of the conjugation machinery of Bacillus subtilis
Sirui Chen, Suffolk University
Exploring directionality and kinetics of a bacterial type IV secretion system
Olukemi Akinleye, Suffolk University
Metformin (glucophage) biodegradation: Insights from microbiome and biochemical analyses
Ashley Robinson, Hamline University
Trypanosoma brucei Tim50 plays critical role in parasite survival in mammalian hosts
Anuj Tripathi, Meharry Medical College, Nashville Chair
2:15 PM - 3:30 PM

Glycobiology: analysis and physiology

Novel "mucinomics" platform reveals molecular signatures of cancer in cellular systems and ovarian cancer patient ascites fluid
Stacy Malaker, Yale University
Unraveling the effect of cysteine residues on N-glycosylation efficiency in the N-terminal domain of hCEACAM1 via top-down mass spectrometry
Robert Williams, University of Georgia Chair
Inhibition of Notch signalling using fucose analogs
Huilin Hao, University of Georgia
O-glycosylation of the novel SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus spike protein influences furin cleavage
Liping Zhang, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research/NIH
Tunicamycin interferes with WNT signaling and inhibits angiogenesis
Melanie Cruz, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus
2:15 PM - 3:30 PM

Oxidative stress and reactive oxygen

Mitochondrial structure and function is impaired in the b-amyloidosis 5xFAD mouse at an extreme early age prior to neurocognitive decline
Amanda Radke, Oregon State University
The role of Annexin-A6 in the metabolic reprogramming and EGFR-TKI resistance in triple-negative breast cancer cells
Stephen Williams, Meharry Medical College
Unraveling the mystery of peroxiredoxin IV secretion reveals a redox-independent unconventional protein secretory pathway
Na Ding, University of Kentucky
Aim32, a dual-localized 2Fe-2S mitochondrial protein that functions in redox quality control
Deepa Dabir, Loyola Marymount University Chair
A novel phosphorylation cascade regulates mitophagic selectivity from within the mitochondrial matrix
Hagai Abeliovich, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
2:15 PM - 3:30 PM

Post-translational modifications

PEA-15 uses a common scaffold to interact with different binding partners in a phosphorylation-dependent manner
Yufeng Wei, New Jersey City University
Identification of molecular switch regulating tyrosine phosphorylation of Intestinal breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) mediated mucosal wound repair and barrier functions in obesity
Jayshree Mishra, Texas A&M University
The viral SUMO-targeted Ubiquitin Ligase ICP0 is phosphorylated and activated by host kinase Chk2
Ranabir Das, National Center for Biological Sciences
Nutrient sensing in plants by O-GlcNAcylation and O-Fucosylation
Shouling Xu, Carnegie Institution for Science
Lysine methylation signaling regulated by SETD6
Dan Levy, Ben Gurion University of the Negev Chair
2:15 PM - 3:30 PM

Regulation of lipid metabolism

Sphingomyelin synthase-related protein generates diacylglycerol via hydrolysis of phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylethanolamine without ceramide
Chiaki Murakami, Chiba University
Initiation of fatty acid synthesis by a malonyl-ACP decarboxylase
Sarah Whaley, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital Chair
Partitioning of the mevalonate synthesizing enzymes
Sean Rogers, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
Regulation of hepatic transcriptional architecture by Pparα and fatty acid oxidation
Kyle Cavagnini, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Saccharomyces cerevisiae Δ9-desaturase Ole1 interacts with lipid biosynthetic enzymes that produce storage lipid, phospholipid, and sterol-esters
Brianna Greenwood, University of Alberta
2:15 PM - 4:00 PM

Alice and C.C. Wang Award in Molecular Parasitology symposium

Host parasite interactions between the sexually-transmitted parasite trichomonas vaginalis and its human host
Patricia Johnson,
Native structure of the Plasmodium falciparum RhopH complex determined using an endogenous structural proteomics approach
Chi-Min Ho, Columbia University Irving Medical Center
Interaction of the microbiome, the mucosal immune system and the parasite
William Petri, University of Virginia
“Trapped" persistent RNA viruses as virulence factors in protozoan parasites
Stephen Beverley, Washington University in St. Louis
2:15 PM - 3:30 PM

Exciting biological insights revealed by proteomics: A Molecular & Cellular Proteomics presentation

Chair: Anne-Claude Gingras, Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Reserch Institute

Turbo-charging proximity labeling: Directed evolution of promiscuous biotin ligase for efficient proteomic mapping in vivo
Tess Branon, University of California, Berkeley
Proximity-dependent sensors reveal new mechanisms of mTOR activation by amino acids
Geoffrey Hesketh, Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute
Proteomics of protein trafficking by in vivo tissue-specific labeling
Ilia Droujinine, Scripps Research Institute
3:30 PM - 3:45 PM

Break/Networking

Visit posters and exhibits and network with colleagues!

3:45 PM - 5:15 PM

Poster discussions

Attend a discussion group to continue the conversation with poster presenters about their research.

Topics
  • Antibiotic resistance — Moderators: Ankit Pandeya and Victoria Babtkis
  • BMB education and professional development — Moderators: Stephanie Dingwall and Joseph Provost
  • Big data, faculty perspectives, service learning — Moderators: Juliana Agubokwu and Veronica Ardi
  • Cancer signaling and therapeutics — Moderators: Madhurima Paul and Jizhong Zhao
  • Chemical biology, drug discovery and bioanalytical methods — Moderators: Jennifer Jossart and Marc Mcleod
  • Chromatin structure and epigenetic modifications — Moderators: Deyong Xiao and Cheng Qian
  • Enzyme chemistry and catalysis — Moderators: Amanda Laseke and Sarah Cho
  • Genomics, glycomics, proteomics and metabolomics — Moderators: Pierre Jean-Beltran and Azeez Alade
  • Glycans, glycosyltransferases, glycans in disease — Moderators: Priyanka Kadav and Tara Hawkinson
  • Metabolism, bioenergetics and oxidative stress — Moderators: Alicia Mercado and Alexandra Daks
  • Metabolism, cancer and nutrition — Moderators: Paul Stamm and Kerri Barron
  • Neurobiology and neuronal signaling — Moderators: Rosalba Siracusa and Xue-Wei Wang
  • Non-coding RNAs and RNA editing — Moderators: Mohammad Sabbir and Sheetal Ramachandran
  • Protein interactions and binding — Moderators: Md. Rahman and Aly Warma
  • Protein modification and intrinsically disordered proteins — Moderators: Ibtihal Alghusen and Victoria Lineva
  • Protein synthesis, structure and modifications — Moderators: Emily Angeles Mancinas and Kingsley Omage
  • Regulation of lipid metabolism — Moderators: Weinan Zhou and Shoily Khondker
  • Signal transduction and cellular regulation — Moderators: Josiah Hardesty and Maitreyee Jathal
5:30 PM - 7:00 PM

Diversity, equity and inclusion event — Where we are and where we should go from here

Sponsored by the ASBMB Minority Affairs Committee

Chairs: Sonia Flores, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, and Gustavo Silva, Duke University

Part 1

Short research presentations by MAC award winners and MOSAIC scholars

MAC award winners

  • Akinlaja Akinlaja, University of British Columbia
  • Ese Ekhator, North Carolina A&T State University
  • Wilfred Lopez-Perez, North Carolina State University
  • Joy Omini, University of Nebraska–Lincoln
  • Tania Palhano Zanela, Iowa State University
  • Robert Rabelo-Fernández, University of Puerto Rico at Rio Piedras
  • Danielle Rouse, Saint Johns University

ASBMB MOSAIC scholars

  • Lillian Brady, Vanderbilt University
  • Josefina del Mármol, Rockefeller University
  • John Jimah, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
  • Elias Picazo, Harvard University
  • Chelsey Spriggs, University of Michigan
  • Elizabeth Wasmuth, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
  • Velencia Witherspoon, Eunice Kenney Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
Part 2

Promoting diversity and advancing racial equity in the biomedical sciences
Kenneth Gibbs, National Institutes of Health

Thursday agenda

10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Bert and Natalie Vallee Award in Biomedical Science lecture

Phospholipase A2: A paradigm for allosteric regulation by membranes and cell signaling
Edward Dennis, University of California, San Diego
11:00 AM - 11:30 AM

Avanti Award in Lipids lecture

Death by lipids: Role of non-coding RNAs in metabolic stress
Jean Schaffer, Joslin Diabetes Center at Harvard University
11:30 AM - 11:45 AM

Break/Networking

Visit posters and exhibits and network with colleagues!

11:45 AM - 1:30 PM

Engaging students in education and research during COVID-19

ASBMB Award for Exemplary Contributions to Education lecture and symposium

Chair: Pam Mertz, St. Mary’s College of Maryland

A revolution in biochemistry and molecular biology education informed by basic research to meet the demands of 21st century career paths
Paul Black, University of Nebraska–Lincoln
Clarity in course communication: Lessons from teaching during COVID-19
Kelly Crowe, Mount St. Joseph University
Analysis of student learning gains in a biochemistry CURE course during the mandatory COVID-19 shift to online learning
Arthur Sikora, Nova Southeastern University
Improving biomolecular visual literacy using augmented reality
Swati Agrawal, University of Mary Washington
11:45 AM - 1:30 PM

Best practices for preventing/managing incidences of harassment in the workplace

Helen Kaiser and Michael Diaz, University of California, San Diego

11:45 AM - 1:30 PM

New insights into control of metabolism by transporters

Chair: Carla Koehler, University of California, Los Angeles
Glutamine transporter as a target of mTOR signaling modulating longevity
John M. Sedivy, Brown University
Regulation of progressive liver disease by mitochondrial carboxylate transport
Eric Taylor, University of Iowa
Role of mitochondrial calcium in the maintenance of skeletal muscle homeostasis
Anna Raffaello, University of Padova
11:45 AM - 1:30 PM

Emerging mechanisms of signaling

Chairs: Wendy Gordon, University of Minnesota, and Adrian Salic, Harvard Medical School

Tuning receptor signaling through ligand engineering
Chris Garcia, Stanford University
Cellular communication via adhesion
Demet Arac, University of Chicago
Mechanisms of Wnt5a-Ror signaling in development and disease
Henry Ho, University of California, Davis
Genetic and acquired heterotopic ossification are driven by a self-amplifying positive feedback loop of Hedgehog signaling
Yingzi Yang, Harvard University Dental School
11:45 AM - 1:30 PM

Glycosylation and extracellular matrix in neurologic and metabolic diseases

Chair: Jamey Marth, Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Protective roles of O-GlcNAc in neurodegenerative diseases
David Vocadlo, Simon Fraser University
The role of the O-GlcNAc transferase interactome in X-linked intellectual disability
Lance Wells, University of Georgia Complex Carbohydrate Research Center
Role of ECM in the brain-gut connection
Fernando Gomez-Pinilla, University of California, Los Angeles Brain Injury Research Center
The role of metabolism in modulating radiation fibrosis and lymphedema
Fei-Fei Liu, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto
11:45 AM - 1:30 PM

Membrane biogenesis and trafficking

Chair: Teresa Dunn-Giroux, Uniformed Services University

Lipid droplet proteome dynamics and lipotoxicity
James Olzmann, University of California, Berkeley
Mechanistic approaches towards understanding physicochemical membrane homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum
Robert Ernst, Saarland University
The role of VPS13 and related proteins in glycerolipid transport at membrane contact sites
Karin Reinisch, Yale University School of Medicine
Cold-induced lipid dynamics in thermogenic fat
Yu-Hua Tseng, Harvard University Medical School
11:45 AM - 1:30 PM

Molecular motors in transport, biosynthesis and energy transduction

Functional assembly of the mitochondrial protein transport machinery
Nathan Alder, University of Connecticut Chair
Structure of the alternative complex III from flavobacterium johnsoniae in a supercomplex with cytochrome c oxidase
Robert Gennis, University of Illinois
An AAA-ATPase using an airlock-like translocation mechanism for folded proteins
Roland Beckmann, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich
Nascent protein selection and triage at the ribosome exit site
Shu-ou Shan, California Institute of Technology
11:45 AM - 1:30 PM

RNA binding proteins and control of RNA biogenesis in disease

Reprogramming cell fates by RNA binding proteins in stem cells and cancer
Takahiro Ito, University of Georgia Chair
The RNA exosome and genetic disease
Anita Corbett, Emory University
Reconstitution of human tRNA intron cleavage leads to an updated model of tRNA splicing
Cassandra Haynes, National Institutes of Health
Connections between mRNP composition and mRNA fate
Guramrit Singh, Ohio State University
1:30 PM - 2:15 PM

Break/Networking

Visit posters and exhibits and network with colleagues!

1:45 PM - 2:15 PM

Meet the experts

Continue the conversation with leading experts from today's symposia and award lectures.

  • Anita Corbett, Emory University
  • Anna Raffaello, University of Padova
  • Cassandra Hayne, National Institutes of Health
  • David Vocadlo, Simon Fraser University
  • Eric Taylor, University of Iowa
  • Fei-Fei Liu, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto
  • Fernando Gomez-Pinilla, University of California, Los Angeles Brain Injury Research Center
  • Guramrit Singh, Ohio State University
  • Henry Ho, University of California, Davis
  • James Olzmann, University of California, Berkeley
  • John Sedivy, Brown University
  • Karin Reinisch, Yale University School of Medicine
  • Lance Wells, University of Georgia Complex Carbohydrate Research Center
  • Nathan Alder, University of Connecticut
  • Robert Ernst, Saarland University
  • Robert Gennis, University of Illinois
  • Shu-ou Shan, California Institute of Technology
  • Yingzi Yang, Harvard University Dental School
  • Yu-Hua Tseng, Harvard University Medical School
2:15 PM - 3:30 PM

Cancer metabolism

Targeting glucose metabolism in HER2+ breast cancer
Sucheta Telang, University of Louisville Brown Cancer Center Chair
Morphine reduces tumor growth in glioma mouse xenograft through modulation of IDH1 activity and metabolic reprogramming
Doorsa Tarazi, University of Toronto
Autophagy inhibition sensitizes liver kinase B1 (LKB1)-deficient kras-driven lung tumors to MEK inhibitor trametinib
Vrushank Bhatt, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey
Dual role played by Ca2+ in the cytotoxicity of human metastatic breast cancer cells
Brianna Scherer, Marian University College of Osteopathic Medicine
Label-free subcellular mapping of iron-bound proteins in breast cancer cells
Kate Tubbesing, SUNY University at Albany
2:15 PM - 3:30 PM

Enzyme chemistry and catalysis

Biochemical characterization of the radical SAM methylase involved in tetrahydromethanopterin biosynthesis
Justin McKinney, Virginia Tech
Ligand bound structure of the alkanesulfonate monooxygenase MsuD provides insight into catalysis
Jeremy Liew, University of Massachusetts Boston
Stimulating the activity of NEP and ACE2: A unique approach to prevent dementia
Shirley Tran, University of Queensland
Cysteines of OGG1 are important for maintaining cellular homeostasis
Katarina Wang, Yale University
Enzymatic synthesis of alpha-Ketobutyrate from methionine: Characterization of methionine gamma lyase deaminase (Mgld) from Porphyromonas gingivalis
Timothy Foo, Florida Atlantic University Chair
2:15 PM - 3:30 PM

G proteins and small GTPases

Chair: Christian Johnson

Structural characterization of the G&γ–ternary SNARE binding interface
Anna Eitel, Vanderbilt University
δNp63α suppresses cell invasion through downregulating Rac1 activity
Amjad Aljagthmi, Wright State University
A novel role for G&γ in mitotic Golgi fragmentation
Kalpana Rajanala, Thomas Jefferson University
2:15 PM - 3:30 PM

Glycotransferaces and hydrolases

Targeting the O-GlcNAc transferase to specific proteins using RNA aptamers
Yi Zhu, University of Georgia
Characterization and development of new anti-toxins targeting Clostridium difficile
Ashleigh Paparella, Albert Einstein College of Medicine Chair
Automatization and self-maintenance of the O-GlcNAcome catalogue: A smart scientific database
Florian Malard, Medical College of Wisconsin
Repurposing the CRISPR-Cas9 system for targeted chromatin O-linked &-N-acetylglucosamine editing
Matthew Parker, Kansas University Medical Center
Determining the role of O-fucose modifications of the stabilin-2 receptor expression and function
Aiah Nour, University of Nebraska–Lincoln
2:15 PM - 3:30 PM

Lipids and inflammation

ATX-LPP3 axis mediated LPA regulation following myocardial injury
Hosne Ara, LSU Health Shreveport
Modulation of lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory cytokine storm by ultramicronized N-almitoylethanolamine
Roberta Fusco, University of Messina Chair
Effects of N-oleoylethanolamide on lymphoblasts deficient in tafazzin
John Chan, University of Waterloo
α/β-hydrolase domain-6 regulates macrophage polarization and its inhibition protects against LPS-induced inflammation
Clémence Schmitt, University of Montreal
Bacteria strain-specific chlorinated lipid production in neutrophils
Kaushalya Amunugama, Saint Louis University
2:15 PM - 3:30 PM

Obesity and metabolic disease

Deletion of PTEN and VDR impair glucose and lipid metabolism
Maria Crespo-Masip, IRB Lleida
Adipocyte deletion of ADAM17 leads to insulin resistance in association with age and HFD in mice
Valeria Lopez Salazar, Institute for Diabetes and Cancer, Helmholtz Zentrum München
2-AAA impairs macrophage efferocytosis and may regulate the development of atherosclerosis
Chuan Wang, Vanderbilt University Medical Center Chair
Increasing glycolysis protects cardiac function against high fat diet-induced cardiomyopathy
Maria Newhardt, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation Chair
New methods to non-invasively measure the kinetics of pancreatic beta cell insulin in circulation in vivo using 2H2O labeling and mass spectrometry
Mohamad Dandan, University of California, Berkeley
2:15 PM - 3:30 PM

Protein complex structures

Crystallographic analyses of the FdsBG subcomplex of the cytosolic formate dehydrogenase FdsDABG from Cupriavidus necator
Gregor Blaha, University of California, Riverside
Atomic structure of the world's smallest virus-like particles: Pleasant surprises in clinical applications
Subir Sarker, La Trobe University
Molecular and structural basis underlying selective targeting of claudins by Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin in mammalian gut
Alex Vecchio, University of Nebraska–Lincoln
Cryo-EM structures of outer-arm dynein array bound to microtubule doublet reveal a mechanism for motor coordination
Qinhui Rao, Yale University Chair
Dimeric CXCL12 (SDF-1) binds to atypical chemokine receptor 1 (ACKR1/DARC)
Kyler Crawford, Medical College of Wisconsin
2:15 PM - 3:30 PM

Protein interaction

Identifying new cofactors for cytokinetic abscission
Dawn Wenzel, Medical College of Wisconsin
Validation of AVA-Seq using a human reference protein-protein interaction set
Stephanie Ramadan, Weill Cornell Medicine Qatar Chair
A cros-nearest neighbor/Monte Carlo algorithm for single molecule localization microscopy defines interactions between p53, Mdm2, and MEG3
Nicholas Bauer, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School
DNA-binding specificity of cardiac transcription factor complex formed by NKX2-5 and TBX5
Jessica Rodríguez-Ríos, University of Puerto Rico Río Piedras Campus
Single-molecule analysis to visualize the direct interaction of proteins and DNA
Nastaran Hadizadeh, LUMICKS
2:15 PM - 3:30 PM

Protein modifications and interactions

The Hippo effector YAP1 biochemically and functionally interacts with the nuclear factor-kappa B/RELA transcription factor
Bekir Cinar, Clark Atlanta University
Palmitoylation of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein is prevented by fatty acid synthase inhibitors
Katrina Mekhail, University of Toronto
Pyk2 tyrosine kinase conformations probed by molecular imprinted nanoparticles
Tania Palhano Zanela, Iowa State University
Identification and characterization of a B-Raf kinase alpha helix critical for the activity of MEK kinase in MAPK signaling
Daniela Fera, Swarthmore College Chair
Molecular interplay between SARS-CoV-2 and human proteins for viral activation and entry, potential drugs for combat and scope for new therapeutics
Naveen Vankadari, Monash University
2:15 PM - 3:15 PM

Lipid Diversity and Disease: Spotlight on Journal of Lipid Research Junior Associate Editors

Chairs: George Carman, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey and Robert Stahelin, Purdue University

The acyl chains of phosphoinositide PIP3 regulate nuclear receptor SF-1 structure and function
Raymond Blind, Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Lipid crosstalk in fatty liver disease
Rotonya Carr, University of Pennsylvania
Regulation of fat partitioning by ANGPTL4
Brandon Davies, University of Iowa
Unraveling the complexities of the lipoprotein(a) particle and its metabolism
Gissette Soffer, Columbia University
3:30 PM - 3:45 PM

Break/Networking

Visit posters and exhibits and network with colleagues!

3:45 PM - 5:15 PM

Poster discussions

Attend a discussion group to continue the conversation with poster presenters about their research.

Topics
  • ASBMB interdisciplinary/translational science (SEBM) — Moderator: Katharine Donohu
  • Bacteria and parasites, antibacterial targets — Moderators: Kelli Hvorecny and Nikolay Tarlavin
  • BMB education and professional development — Moderators: Melissa Nickell and Jacob Dums
  • Cancer signaling and therapeutics — Moderators: Victoria Davenport and Timofei Lebedev
  • Chemical biology, drug discovery and bioanalytical methods — Moderators: Shikha Chauhan and Rachana Tomar
  • Diabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome — Moderator: Pegah Poursharifi
  • Drug screening, chemical biology and chemical probes — Moderators: Hayley Widden and Laura Danner
  • Enzyme mechanisms, kinetics and energetics — Moderators: Lindsay Davis and Jamariya Howard
  • Genomics, glycomics, proteomics and metabolomics — Moderators: Victoria Shender and Mehul Mehra
  • Immune and extracellular matrix signaling — Moderators: Kristen Segars and Amber MacDonald
  • Lipids, membranes and inflammation — Moderators: Maia Kinnebrew and Takehiro Kado
  • Protein interactions and binding — Moderators: Zhao Yang and Geneva Crump
  • Protein structure and biophysics — Moderators: Pravesh Shrestha and Verna Van
  • Protein synthesis, folding and turnover — Moderators: Mercede Furr and Kankan Wang
  • Protein synthesis, structure and modifications — Moderators: Erich Keuchler and James Byrnes
  • Proteomics — Moderator: Nicholas Riley
  • Regulation of lipid metabolism — Moderators: Rachel Wilson and Geordan Stukey
  • Signal transduction and cellular regulation — Moderators: Chinyere Agbaegbu Iweka and Taeyeop Park
  • Transcriptional mechanisms, regulation and RNA polymerases — Moderators: Rachel Jones Lipinski and Joshua Nord
5:30 PM - 7:00 PM

National Science Foundation: Molecular and cellular bioscience opportunities

This event is an outreach webinar about NSF funding priorities and opportunities of interest to the ASBMB community. Attendees will gain detailed and customized knowledge of how NSF, particularly the Molecular and Cellular Biosciences Division (MCB), supports the scholarly and educational mission of the ASBMB community.

Target audience: Active researchers and educators in all STEM disciplines.

Presenters
  • Matthew Buechner, Cellular Dynamics and Function Program, MCB/NSF
  • Manju Hingorani, Genetic Mechanisms Program, MCB/NSF
  • Marcia Newcomer, Molecular Biophysics Program, MCB/NSF
  • David Rockcliffe, Systems and Synthetic Biology Program, MCB/NSF
5:30 PM - 7:00 PM

Workshop and networking for inclusive practices and inclusive course content

Strategically incorporating diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) topics and practices into the curriculum and research is challenging to many scientists. What to include, how and where to incorporate it, and how to practice it can be worrying. This session will include a panel followed by networking sessions to provide guidance to those hesitant to incorporate DEI. A faculty panel will share experiences and resources, assist members in creating DEI goals with the support to achieve them. Attendees will then work in virtual roundtables with facilitators to share concerns, incorporate ideas and develop action plans. The workshop's goal is to promote networking and opportunities for collaboration for those interested in DEI issues. In support of this goal, attendees will have access a folder to share DEI resources and contact information both during and after the workshop.

Speakers
  • Marilee Benore, University of Michigan Dearborn
  • Sonia Flores, University of Colorado School of Medicine
  • Neena Grover, Colorado College
  • Jennifer Roecklein-Canfield, Simmons College
  • Takita Sumter, Winthrop University

Friday agenda

10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Ruth Kirschstein Diversity in Science Award lecture

Getting there: Thyroid hormone receptor intracellular trafficking
Lizabeth Allison, College of William & Mary
10:30 AM - 11:00 AM

Walter A. Shaw Young Investigator Award in Lipid Research lecture

Shedding light on phosphatidic acid signaling with chemical tools
Jeremy Baskin, Cornell University
11:00 AM - 11:15 AM

Break/Networking

Visit posters and exhibits and network with colleagues!

11:15 AM - 12:30 PM

Antibacterial targets and drug discovery

Lacritin bactericidal peptide N-104 targets FeoB and PotH through interaction with the surface-exposed lipoprotein YaiW
Mohammad Sharifian Gh., University of Virgina Chair
Exploring a novel Class A β-lactamase inhibitor against the class C β-lactamase pseudomonas-derived cephalosporinase (PDC)
Andrew Mack, Case Western Reserve University
Novel sulfonyl piperzine antibiotics targeting the lipid A biosynthetic enzyme LpxH in gram-negative bacteria
Colleen Cochrane, Duke University
Antimicrobial activity of a histone derived peptide in the airway surface liquid
Matthew Biggart, St George's University of London
Identification of mutasynthetic inhibitors of yersiniabactin production in uropathogenic E. coli
Yiquan Xu, Washington University School of Medicine
11:15 AM - 12:30 PM

Big ideas in small packages: Advances in nanotechnology

Utilizing DPPC liposomes to capture persistent organic pollutants
Monica Rieth, Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville Chair
Designing of DLinDMA-anchored liposomal carrier for gene therapy of rare genetic lafora disease
Hari Priya Vemana, St. John's University
Characterization of Pullulan/PVP/Curcumin-loaded fibers and films fabricated by geometrical conversion
Soyeong Jeong, Ewha Womans University
Atomistic study of several peptides covering single-walled carbon nanotube by noncovalent adsorption
Karina Barcelos, Memorial University of Newfoundland
ViruClear: Molecularly designed biomimetic nanosponges for prevention and treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infections in COVID19 patients
Babak Esmaeli-Azad, CellCure (CiBots, Inc.)
11:15 AM - 12:30 PM

Chemical probes, biosensors and biomarkers

Fluorescent sensors for detection and quantification of bacterial siderophores and metal complexes
Ashish Kumar, Kansas State University
DNA aptamers for early detection of Ebola virus
Soma Banerjee, Aptalogic, Inc. Chair
Optimizing a biosensor-based assay for ubiquitination activation
Roma Broadberry, James Madison University
Modular enzyme- and light- activatable cyclopropene-tetrazine ligation for spatiotemporal imaging of biological systems
Ting Jiang, Stony Brook University
Machine learning identifies multiple novel potential serum-based biomarkers for diagnosis of osteoarthritis
Elisha Johnston, El Camino College
11:15 AM - 12:30 PM

Glycan binding proteins

Heparan sulfate microarray lends insight into selective binding of SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein
John Chittum, Virginia Commonwealth University
Tuning multivalent signaling of extracellular galectin-3 
Gregory Hudalla, University of Florida Chair
Nutrient sensing in plants by O-GlcNAcylation and O-Fucosylation
Shouling Xu, Carnegie Institution for Science
It takes two: Understanding the role of protein-protein interaction in the regulation of an innate immune receptor
Ophelia Ukaegbu, University of Delaware
Proteolytic processing, maturation and unique synteny of streptomyces hemagglutinin, SHA
Yoko Fujita-Yamaguchi, Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope
11:15 AM - 12:30 PM

Intrinsically disordered proteins, prions and amyloids

Humanin inactivates pro-apoptotic BCL-2 proteins through a common fibril-forming mechanism
Daniel Morris, National Institutes of Health Chair
Oxidation of Huntingtin modulates its aggregation and interaction with membranes
Adewale Adegbuyiro, West Virginia University
Molecular determinants of PKA RI-alpha driven liquid-liquid phase separation
Julia Hardy, University of California, San Diego
Mechanistic and structural characterization of full-length,aggregation-prone, TDP-43 protein
Josephine Esposto, Trent University
Conformational dynamics of SNARE proteins during NSF-mediated disassembly
Katie Dunleavy, West Virginia University
11:15 AM - 12:30 PM

Membrane proteins and lipids

Post-translational modifications regulate lipid remodeling enzyme during
Zachery Shomo, University of Nebraska–Lincoln
Identification of particular defects in the trafficking of polymorphic ABCG2
Zsuzsa Bartos, Research Centre for Natural Sciences Institute of Enzymology
Dissecting regulatory interactions with cytosolic N-terminal domain of VATPase
Farzana Tuli, State University of New York Upstate Medical University
Distinguishing different conformations of membrane-bound alpha-synuclein
Brandon Williams, Westminster College Chair
11:15 AM - 12:30 PM

Microbe/parasite–host interactions

Human short peptidoglycan recognition protein PGLYRP1/Tag-7/PGRP-S inhibits Listeria monocytogenes intracellular survival in macrophages
Darya Slonova, Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology
TAK1 inhibition elicits mitochondrial ROS to block intracellular bacterial colonization    
Wilfred López-Pérez, North Carolina State University
SARS-CoV-2 viral budding and entry can be modeled using BSL-2 level virus-like particles
Caroline Plescia, Purdue University Chair
Lung time no see
Nicholas Evans, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center
Proteomic study of nonstructural protein 1 of SARS-CoV to identify its role in host shutoff
Anita Nag, University of South Carolina Upstate
11:15 AM - 12:30 PM

Protein engineering and design

Molecular Basis for Rep HUH-endonuclease mediated protein-DNA bioconjugation
Kassidy Tompkins, University of Minnesota Chair
A chimeric variant of two gentisate 1,2-dioxygenases with improved catalytic activity, altered structural conformation and substrate specificity
Patrick Semana, Concordia University
Photocatalytic activity of hybrid P450 enzymes
Lionel Cheruzel, San Jose State University
Engineering a modular protein color switch using an entropy-driven beta strand exchange
Anna John, State University of New York Upstate Medical University
11:15 AM - 12:30 PM

Protein folding and chaperones

Investigating the interaction of GATA-4 with the myosin chaperone, striated muscle UNC-45
Odutayo Odunuga, Stephen F. Austin State University
Inhibition of tau protein phosphorylation and aggregation
Sanela Martic, Trent University
A novel missense variant in DLG2/PSD-93 disrupts protein folding and binding in neurodevelopmental disorders
Eddy Yang, Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health
Enzymes, moonlighting enzymes, pseudoenzymes: Members of a protein superfamily can have similar amino acid sequences but different functions
Constance Jeffery, University of Illinois at Chicago Chair
Structural basis for effector transmembrane domain recognition by type VI secretion system chaperones
John Whitney, McMaster University
11:15 AM - 12:30 PM

Protein kinases and phosphatases

Structural insights into pseudokinase domains of receptor tyrosine kinases
Joshua Sheetz, Yale University
Autophosphorylation of the CK1 kinase domain regulates enzyme activity and substrate specificity
Sierra Cullati, Vanderbilt University
Mediator kinase substrates in human myometrial stem cells revealed by using chemical inhibitors and quantitative phosphoproteomics
Lindsey Barron, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Chair
Sensitive Akt biosensor and expansion microscopy reveal regulation of Akt at the lysosome
Mingyuan Chen, University of California, San Diego
TAOK2 is an ER kinase that catalyzes the dynamic tethering of ER to microtubules
Kimya Nourbakhsh, University of Washington
11:15 AM - 12:30 PM

Protein turnover, misfolding, aggregation and degradation

Clearance of nuclear and cytosolic aggregates at nuclear-vacuolar junctions
Emily Sontag, Marquette University Chair
Respective, time-dependent phosphorylation modules shaping phosphoproteome abundance and turnover
Yansheng Liu, Yale University School of Medicine
Functional cooperativity between the trigger factor chaperone and the ClpXP proteolytic complex
Walid Houry, University of Toronto
Elucidation of a novel mechanism for faulty protein retention and a therapeutic strategy for facilitated lysosomal removal
Moran Dvela-Levitt, Bar-Ilan University
High resolution structural analysis of ALS-associated mutant SOD1 inclusion
Dalia Naser, University of Waterloo
11:15 AM - 12:30 PM

JBC Herbert Tabor Early Career Investigator Awards

The Journal of Biological Chemistry honors first authors

Chairs: George DeMartino, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, and Lila Gierasch, University of Massachusetts

Mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor is an ER-resident chaperone that protects against reductive stress in the heart
Adrian Arrieta, San Diego State University
RNase L promotes the formation of unique ribonucleoprotein granules distinct from stress granules
James Burke, University of Colorado, Boulder
MtcB, a member of the MttB superfamily from the human gut acetogen Eubacterium limosum, is a cobalamin-dependent carnitine demethylase
Duncan Kountz, Harvard University
A search for influenza A and B virus hemagglutinin-activating host cell proteases with trypsin-like activity in the murine airways
Anne Harbig, Philipps-University Marburg
Gαs directly drives PDZ-RhoGEF signaling to Cdc42
Alejandro Castillo-Kauil, CINVESTAV–IPN
12:30 PM - 1:00 PM

Break/Networking

Visit posters and exhibits and network with colleagues!

1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Mentoring from both sides: How to find, be and utilize a great mentor

Presenter: Joanne Kamens

Mentoring should not be a scary or imposing concept — it's really just about getting and giving advice, support and encouragement for ongoing learning. This workshop is intended for everyone: trainees and faculty ready to learn practical tactics in identifying mentors, making the "ask" for mentoring support and how to take the best advantage of mentoring relationships — from both sides.

1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Improving visual literacy using augmented reality and LEGO® bricks in biology classrooms

Presenters: Shane Austin and Swati Agrawal

Interactive workshop: short presentations by facilitators (15 mins.) followed by interactive sessions where participants get hands on experience with the use of both augmented reality and LEGO® bricks to explain course content. 

We have developed a series of lessons focused on DNA and protein structure, function and interaction where AR and LEGO® bricks are used to provide three-dimensional interactive models that help students better visualize these intricate structures and processes in our classes. During this workshop we will present some of these lessons and the way we execute it on our classes. These lessons will cover concepts like levels of organization in protein structure, domains in protein involved in metabolic pathways and protein–DNA interaction during processes involved in transcription.

After the brief presentation, participants will model as students and use these lessons to experience and assess the learning gains of this activity. Workshop participants will learn how to develop content for AR using free and easily available platforms so they are able to generate content suited for their courses. Finally, ideas about possible classroom assessments will be presented. 

Target audience: Instructors or student from two-year or four-year college. Emphasis will be placed on examples relevant to biochemistry, molecular biology and cell biology, however, techniques could be applied to wider biology educator audiences.

1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Using 3D-printed models to teach structure–function relationships and network models and simulations to teach metabolic systems in biochemistry courses

Presenter: Rebecca Roston

Interactive experience where the problem is presented (difficulty learning systems and structure–function relationships from static images) and a quick example “lesson” is done with the group. Instructors will be introduced to six structure–function and six biochemical systems instruction methods.

All materials are provided, including: a set of 3D printed models, 3D printer files for all (>20) models, access to more than 10 interactive computer metabolic models, paper and electronic in-class activity appropriate for lecture halls to small classes, accompanying powerpoint slides with clicker questions, and assessment questions. We will briefly show the data from our three publications (JMBE, BAMBED) showing the strong effectiveness of the techniques.

Target audience: Instructors teaching the major content-heavy undergraduate biochemistry classes either for majors or non-majors, we have piloted these in both.

1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Emerging technologies in the glyosciences

Sponsored by the Society for Glycobiology

Presenters: Natasha Zachara and Catherine Grimes

In this workshop, our goal is to promote the study of glycans, enabling participants to develop a more comprehensive understanding of the roles that glycans play in physiology and disease. Join us to learn about innovative solutions to glycoscience problems and participate in roundtable discussions focused on addressing glycoscience challenges. This workshop is ideal for both experts, researchers new to the field and trainees.

The workshop will include six short presentations describing new innovations in the field, followed by a roundtable discussion in which attendees are encouraged to ask questions about the presented material or their own glycoscience challenge. Presenters include Richard Drake, Catherine Grimes, Ajit Varki, Michael Tiemeyer, Nicola Pohl and Natasha Zachara. Topics covered include approaches for carbohydrate synthesis, glycomic and glycoproteomic approaches, the detection and analysis of sialic acids, modulation and detection of O-GlcNAc, tools for studying the bacterial cell wall, and computational/database resources for studying glycans.

1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Inclusive teaching: Supporting undergrads and grads in in-person and remote classrooms and labs

Sponsored by the ASBMB Education and Professional Development Committee

Presenters: Khadijah Mitchell and Tracie Addy, Lafayette College

Issues of diversity, equity and inclusion are more visible on campuses across the country than in the recent past. In line with the ASBMB's mission to advance the science of biochemistry and molecular biology through support of science education at all levels and by promoting the diversity of individuals entering the scientific workforce, this workshop focuses on inclusive teaching of undergraduate and graduate students in classroom and laboratory settings, whether in person or online. Based on our forthcoming book, What Inclusive Instructors Do, we will provide evidence-based principles and practices from a national inclusive teaching study that can be used in various learning contexts. This workshop is designed to build your confidence in using inclusive teaching strategies in classroom and laboratory communities through the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.

By the end of this workshop participants will be able to: 

  1. Identify DEI challenges facing teaching and learning in biochemistry and molecular biology classrooms.
  2. Identify DEI challenges facing teaching and learning in biochemistry and molecular biology research laboratories.
  3. Devise possible solutions suitable for in-person and remote contexts.
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Student Chapters career panel

  • Erin Sayer, University of Nebraska — Lincoln
  • Shyretha Brown, Gatorade Sports Science Institute
  • James Robertson, FBI
1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Science policy and advocacy for early-career researchers

Chairs: Adriana Bankston, University of California, Office of the President, and Adrianne Lee, University of Illinois at Chicago

This session will provide an introduction to science policy and advocacy for early-career researchers, strategies for communicating with policy makers and the public, and opportunities to practice and receive feedback on giving an elevator pitch and policy writing.

1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Advocacy Town Hall

Sponsored by the ASBMB Public Affairs Advisory Committee

Join the ASBMB Public Affairs Advisory Committee to hear about the intersection of policy and science. What policies has the Biden administration enacted to support the nation’s biomedical research enterprise? And how can federal agencies support researchers still struggling with the impacts of COVID-19 and related university and laboratory shutdowns. ASBMB Public Affairs Director Ben Corb will be joined by the PAAC chair, Terri Kinzy, and the incoming chair, Rick Page, who will field your questions on politics, science policy and getting involved in advocacy.

2:45 PM - 4:00 PM

Analyses and physiology of the glycome

Evolutionary glycomics: A comprehensive study of vertebrate host serum/plasma glycome using orthogonal glycomics techniques
Abarna V. M. Murugan, Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus Chair
Brain glycogen serves as a critical glucosamine cache required for protein glycosylation
Matthew Gentry, University of Kentucky College of Medicine
Glycomic profiling unveils association between serum glycosylation and antibody responses to influenza vaccines
Rui Qin, University of Alberta
Enhanced interface for retrieving glycan and glycosylation data from GlyGen
Michael Tiemeyer, University of Georgia
Proteomics for personalized medicine in diabetes
Mark Wang, University of Connecticut School of Medicine
2:45 PM - 4:00 PM

Apoptosis and cell death

Arginyltransferase1 mediates cell death by a mitochondria-dependent pathway
Akhilesh Kumar, University of Miami School of Medicine
Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase protects smooth muscle cells against oxidative/genotoxic stress by activation of the apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease I pathway
Ina Nicoli, Tulane University School of Medicine
FAF1 blocks ferroptosis by inhibiting peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids
Shaojie Cui, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
Evaluation of ferroptocide (FTC) as a potential immunogenic cell death inducing agent in prostate cancer cells
Hillary Shah, University of Illinois at Chicago Chair
Mitochondrial DNA copy number assist with diagnosis of vague myopathy
In Heo, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine
2:45 PM - 4:00 PM

Cancer signaling and therapeutics

The EGF domains of MUC4 oncomucin interact with ErbB2 and mediate tumorigenic activity of cancer cells represent new potential therapeutic targets
Nicolas Stoup, Canther
Tyrosine nitration supports glioblastoma multiforme cell survival and regulates migration
Kyle Nguyen, Oregon State University
GATA1, GATA2, and TAL1 regulate the expression of neurotrophic receptor tyrosine kinase in leukemia cells
Elmira Vagapova, Russian Academy of Sciences Engelhardt Institute of Molecular Biology
A novel anthelminthic drug suppresses the growth of medulloblastoma tumors by inhibiting PKA/Gli1 signaling axis
Itishree Kaushik, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center
Inactive VEGFR2(R1032Q) exerts pro-oncogenic activity through heterodimerization with wild-type receptor
Elisabetta Grillo, University of Brescia Chair
2:45 PM - 4:00 PM

Enzyme mechanisms, kinetics and dynamics

Metabolites modulate malate dehydrogenase-citrate synthase multienzyme complex formation
Joy Omini, University of Nebraska–Lincoln
19F NMR illustrates novel aspects of cytochrome P450 systems
Christopher Campomizzi, University at Buffalo Chair
Kinetics of DNA bending by a human DNA glycosylase
Anika Burrell, University of Washington
Dissecting the effects of resveratrol on SIRT1 activity against different peptide substrates
Reena Dosanjh, San Jose State University
Polyphosphate kinase terminal modifications alter enzymatic activity and affect stress recovery in E. coli
Marvin Bowlin, University of Alabama at Birmingham
2:45 PM - 4:00 PM

Filling gaps and pushing frontiers, bioinformatically speaking

Using loops to jump through hoops in Flaviviridae
Brandon Roy, Cornell University
Computational prediction of susceptibility to limited proteolysis for proteins with known 3D structure
Eugene Matveev, Institute for Information Transmission Problems
Identification, characterization and drug discovery for novel target sites for SARS-CoV-2 proteins
Suhasini Iyengar, Northeastern University
Characterization and structure-function analysis of autophagy factor ATG7 from Trypanosoma Brucei (TbATG7) as a potential drug target
Kayla Karnes, Texas Wesleyan University
Automatization and self-maintenance of the O-GlcNAcome catalogue: A smart scientific database
Florian Malard, Medical College of Wisconsin Chair
2:45 PM - 4:00 PM

Finding a CURE with big data

Merging biochemical and analytical training: A computational approach to chemical communication
Clement Vinauger, Virginia Tech Chair
Annotation parasitoid wasp venom transcripts
Ryan Billings, Lane College
Teaching data management and literacy to support course-embedded research projects
Christopher Berndsen, James Madison University
Protein data bank: 50 years of macromolecular structures enabling research and education
Christine Zardecki, RCSB Protein Data Bank
BASIL: A biochemistry laboratory CURE with flexibility across learning modalities
Arthur Sikora, Nova Southeastern University
2:45 PM - 4:00 PM

Getting creative with BMB education

Active drawing of mechanisms of genetics and molecular biology as an undergraduate learning tool
Martin Hicks, Monmouth University Chair
Using student generated memes to review content and build class community
Karen Resendes, Westminster College
Collaborative online concept mapping for complex gene expression studies in undergraduate research-based courses
Gretchen Hoyer, University of Colorado Boulder
Gamification of general education science courses for online delivery
Cheryl Clauson-Kozina, Saint Leo University
Gamification of lab research to improve access to scientific career exploration
Kenneth Hallenbeck, ReImagine Science
2:45 PM - 4:00 PM

Immune signaling

The function of β-carotene on colonic inflammation and gut barrier integrity
Emilio Balbuena, North Carolina State University
Dicer deletion leads to different antiviral responses in mouse embryonic stem cells
Chandan Gurung, University of Southern Mississippi
The effects of acidic pH on macrophage phagocytosis and tumor lysate response
Sarah Turley, University of Mount Union
Telomere length dependent regulation of IL1R1 (Interleukin 1Receptor type I) by TRF2 (Telomere repeat binding factor 2) is crucial to TAM (tumor associated macrophage) infiltration in cancer cells
Ananda Mukherjee, CSIR–Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology
Transcriptome analysis of reactivated TH1 cells reveal distinct differences between priming and reactivation processes
Martha Kiljan, University Hospital Cologne
Suppressors of signaling protein 3 inhibits glucocorticoid-induced M2 polarization of monocytic cells by attenuation of ROS/p38 and GILZ-mediated anti-inflammatory cytokine production
Choong-Eun Lee, Chair
2:45 PM - 4:00 PM

Metabolomics to explain biology

Metabolic effects of ALDH1L1 knockout in diethylnitrosamine-induced model of liver carcinogenesis
Jaspreet Sharma, University of North Carolina Nutrition Research Institute Chair
A metabolomic analysis of the sex-dependent Hispanic paradox
Jeffrey Patterson, Arizona State University
Metabolic compensation associated with progressive mitochondrial dysfunction
Esther Lim, University of California, San Diego
Traffic analysis reveals the impact of dietary intake on lipid metabolism
Samuel Furse, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
Metabolic response to point mutations reveals principles of modulation of in vivo enzyme activity and phenotype
Sanchari Bhattacharyya, Harvard University Chair
2:45 PM - 4:00 PM

Projects in our communities

Chair: Melanie Van Stry

Design, synthesis and testing of an anti-COVID gene therapy: Integration of authentic research into an undergraduate laboratory course
Flobater Gawargi, Monmouth University
Engaging elementary students in COVID safety precautions
Valeanna Adams, Lane College
Minor changes with large implications: Modeling amino acid mutations in SARS-CoV monoclonal antibodies (80R and 362) towards the design of more universal antibodies
Carol Manikkuttiyil, Nova Southeastern University
CUREing ocean plastic in pandemic times
Ana Maria Barral, National University
An inclusive workshop centered on assessment of biochemistry and molecular biology student learning outcomes
Victoria Del Gaizo Moore, Elon University
2:45 PM - 4:00 PM

Moving beyond listening in BMB education

The exciting journey of a metabolite — A visual online lesson on metabolic flux for undergraduates
Shraddha Nayak, University of Utah
Using biometric tools to investigate how students cognitively process the structure of prostaglandin H2 synthase
Tia Gordon, Kennesaw State University
Less (learning how to learn) ∝ more (learning): Teaching structure-function with 3D-printed models in large, undergraduate biochemistry classes
Rebecca Roston, University of Nebraska–Lincoln
Analyzing student cognition in problem solving via online surveys
Rachel Simmons, National University Chair
Incorporating molecular biophysics in the undergraduate curriculum
Peter Nelson, Fisk University
2:45 PM - 4:00 PM

Vesicle trafficking

Homeostatic regulation of STING by retrograde membrane traffic to the ER
Kojiro Mukai, Tohoku University Chair
Iron transporter DMT1 regulates endosome-mitochondria dynamics, mitochondrial metabolism and invasive migration in breast cancer cells
Jonathan Barra, Albany Medical College
Assigning protein subcellular distributions of vesicle associated tail-anchored membrane proteins by image-based machine learning
Wiebke Schormann, Sunnybrook Research Institute
Senescence-associated exosome exchange activates myofibroblast phenotype in mesenchymal stem cells
Amy Lee, Brown University
Outer membrane vesicles from E.coli contain peptidoglycan associated lipoprotein, a potential diagnostic biomarker for sepsis
Maha Khokhar, Rochester Institute of Technology
2:45 PM - 4:00 PM

Who gets a seat at the table?

Anti-racist teaching
Neena Grover, Colorado College Chair
Diversity, equity and inclusion in science courses — Lessons learned (and still learning)
Marilee Benore, University of Michigan Dearborn
Increasing the sense of belonging by students in a department of biochemistry
Glenda Gillaspy, Virginia Tech
Assessment of an activity to promote community building, inclusion and perseverance in introductory college STEM courses
Valentina Alvarez, Wellesley College
COVID-19 lessons: Compassion and flexibility are critical to equitable learning
Orla Hart, Purdue University
3:30 PM - 3:45 PM

Break/Networking

Visit posters and exhibits and network with colleagues!

3:30 PM - 5:15 PM

Virtual poster presentations