Oct. 7–10, 2021 | Virtual

Emerging Roles of the Nucleolus

This unique meeting will bring together scientists who focus on nucleolar structure and function, but with diverse research perspectives and approaches, to facilitate a wide-ranging discussion and an in-depth exploration of the subject from many angles. The topics addressed will range in scope from basic biology to human disease, from the biophysical properties of this organelle, to cancer prognosis and treatments, and reproduction.

The realization that nucleolar morphology changes over development and in disease has long been appreciated. T.H. Montgomery (1898) recognized the myriad morphologies in different cell types while Barbara McClintock (1934) realized that the nucleolus arises at a distinct cytogenetic locus, which she named the nucleolar organizer. The 1960s brought the realization that nucleoli represent the site of ribosome biogenesis, arguably the most energetically demanding process in a cell. Subsequently the nucleolus has been identified as a major hub for noncoding RNAs and processes in addition to ribosome biogenesis.

However, this fascinating organelle is only beginning to be understood at a molecular level. With emerging new technology in imaging, biophysics, gene editing, genomics and proteomics, our appreciation of the roles of the nucleolus in health and disease are rapidly changing. This meeting will provide a forum for sharing new ideas on the topic.

Organizers

Jennifer Gerton
Jennifer Gerton
Stowers Institute for Medical Research
Francesca E. Duncan
Francesca E. Duncan
Northwestern University
Craig Pikaard
Craig Pikaard
Indiana University