Learning Labs

Sunday, April 23

High-performance mass spectrometry for proteomics
McCormick Place, W185bc
6:15 p.m. - 7:45 p.m.
Jennifer Brodbelt, University of Texas, Austin, and Joshua Coon, University of Wisconsin-Madison
The improvements in performance metrics of mass spectrometers, coupled with the development of new MS/MS methods and new strategies for quantitation, have significantly accelerated the field of proteomics, to the point where nearly every protein in a human cell can be quantified. This workshop, led by Jenny Brodbelt from the University of Texas, Austin, and Josh Coon from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, will showcase some of the latest mass spectrometry technologies for identifying proteins and their post-translational modifications, as well as forefront applications of bottom-up and top-down proteomic approaches to untangling the multi-faceted networks that regulate complex organisms and their diseases. 

Beyond DNA methylation and histone modifications
McCormick Place, W186abc
6:15 p.m. - 7:45 p.m.
Wei Li, Baylor College of Medicine and Kai Tan, University of Pennsylvania
Epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, can change gene expression and cause diseases without changing the underlying DNA sequence. Next-generation sequencing has been transforming the field of epigenetics, generating large datasets of BS-seq, ChIP-seq and RNA-seq information. This poses great challenges for data analysis, requiring knowledge of best ways to distill high-dimensional information into comprehensible conclusions. In this workshop, Wei Li from Baylor College of Medicine and Kai Tan from the University of Pennsylvania will present several cutting-edge analytical frameworks for epigenomic data analysis and demonstrate how to integrate multidimensional epigenomic datasets to construct condition-specific transcriptional regulatory networks. 

Monday, April 24

Academic drug discovery: charting a roadmap for moving basic ideas into the clinic
McCormick Place, W185bc
6:15 p.m. - 7:45 p.m.
Zhong-Yin Zhang, Purdue University and Shaomeng Wang, University of Michigan
So you have identified a biological target or a pathway. Now what? This workshop is designed to teach academic investigators how to navigate the challenging but highly rewarding process of small molecule drug discovery. The workshop will cover major techniques and steps in drug discovery, and present specific examples of moving targets and molecules through the drug-discovery process. The workshop leaders, Zhong-Yin Zhang from Purdue University and Shaomeng Wang from the University of Michigan, also will share their best practices and lessons learned. 

CRISPR-based versatile tools and their major application areas
McCormick Place, W184bc
6:15 p.m. - 7:45 p.m.
Mazhar Adli, University of Virginia and Jacob Corn, University of California, Berkeley
This workshop, led by Mazhar Adli at the University Virginia School of Medicine and Jacob Corn at the University of California, Berkeley, will present leading-edge CRISPR/Cas9-based technologies and their applications. The wide range of versatile CRISPR-based tools will be covered, with focus given to the design of experiments, downstream analysis and major pitfalls. Specific applications of CRISPR to genome-scale knockout screening and locus-specific epigenetic editing approaches will also be presented. 

Tuesday, April 25

Lipidic cubic phase crystallography
McCormick Place, W184bc
6:15 p.m. - 7:45 p.m.
Andrew Kruse, Harvard Medical School, and Aashish Manglik, Stanford University
Lipidic cubic phase crystallography and related methods have transformed membrane-protein structural biology. They have led us to most of the known structures of G-protein-coupled receptors, as well as structures of many other membrane proteins, enzymes and transporters. This workshop, led by Andrew Kruse of Harvard Medical School and Aashish Manglik of Stanford University, will focus on how to crystallize membrane proteins by the lipidic cubic phase method and will include a live hands-on demonstration of the technique.

Principles and applications of modern kinetic and equilibrium analysis
McCormick Place, W186abc
6:15 p.m. - 7:45 p.m.
Kenneth Johnson, KinTek Corporation
This workshop will teach attendees how to answer important questions about enzyme mechanisms by designing the right experiments and interpreting them quantitatively. The workshop will be taught by Kenneth Johnson at The University of Texas and founder of KinTek Corporation, a leader in precision stepped-flow and quench-flow instruments for rapid transient reaction kinetics. It will present basic foundations and applications of kinetic analysis, then cover topics ranging from chemical kinetics and enzymology to pharmacokinetics and cell biology. It will demonstrate the use of KinTek computer simulation software to fit multiple data sets simultaneously, including kinetic and equilibrium measurements. Attendees will learn how to perform a wide range of experiments and interpret them rigorously, without simplifying approximations and errors inherent in fitting data using equations.