An artist named Crick


Kindra Crick is the granddaughter of Francis Crick, co-discoverer of the structure of DNA. An artist with a biochemistry background who recently began fusing art and science in her sculptural work and paintings, she talks with ASBMB's science writing intern, Bree Yanagisawa, about her journey from scientist to artist and the influence her grandfather and his artist wife had on who she is today.

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Devoted to DNA


Fyodor Urnov at Sangamo BioSciences helped coin the phrase "genome editing," is a foremost expert in zinc finger nucleases and a popular speaker who mooonlights as an adjunct at the University of California, Berkeley. The child of a linguist and a literary critic, Urnov tells chief science correspondent Rajendrani Mukhopadhyay about growing up in Soviet-era Russia, how reading "The Double Helix" as a kid fueled a passion for DNA that has never cooled, and what it means to now see DNA as a druggable target in his research on blood diseases. 

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When our DNA is fair game


A bioartist concerned with privacy, genetics and the future of biotechnology creates startling 3-D portraits through DNA phenotyping of discarded items like chewing gum, cigarette butts and human hair.

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Budding artist


An installation artist melds natural and artificial processes in her living pieces and strives to bring the arts and sciences closer together.

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The Petri painter


Petri dishes may be just another lab consumable to scientists. But to artist Klari Reis they are perfect containers for her biologically informed paintings. After a chronic immune disorder diagnosis, Reis was invited into a lab to view her cells reacting to treatments. Every since, she's been translating the cellular structures and bright stains she saw under the microscope into dynamic art, and her Petri dishes have garnered the attention of private and public collectors and scientists from around the globe. 

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Making STEAM


ASBMB Today's managing editor, Lauren Dockett, introduces a new magazine series that will feature champions of STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and math). 

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The bacteria show


Former pharmaceutical researcher Zachary Copfer is a popular bio artist who turns bacteria into living portraits of scientists and celebrities. Contributor Nicole Woitowich talks to Copfer about the why and how of this novel art form.

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Real science gets inked!


“The World of Viruses” is a strikingly illustrated comic book that is the brainchild of Judy Diamond, professor and curator of informal science education at the University of Nebraska State Museum. An American Association for the Advancement of Science fellow, Diamond created a super legion of virologists, science educators, writers and artists to produce the graphic novel, which pits scientists against viruses in a battle for human survival.

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