Richard Nelson Perham (1937 – 2015)


Colleagues remember Richard Perham, who was distinguished for his work on the chemistry of proteins and the assembly of giant protein complexes.

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Donald F. Steiner (1930 – 2014)


Donald F. Steiner, the distinguished professor emeritus at the University of Chicago who elucidated the mechanism of biosynthesis of insulin from proinsulin, died Nov. 11 at age 84.

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Robert Bittman (1942 – 2014)


Robert Bittman, an organic lipid chemist and distinguished professor at the City University of New York and Queens College, died Oct. 1 of pancreatic cancer. He was 72. Bittman won the Avanti Award from the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology in 2003 and served on the editorial board of ASBMB’s Journal of Lipid Research.

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A death in the ASBMB family


The ASBMB staff remembers Scott Magid, a peer-review coordinator for the Journal of Biological Chemistry who died after being struck by a car in November.
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Robert T. Schimke (1932 – 2014)


Robert Tod Schimke, an emeritus professor of biology at Stanford University, died Sept. 6 at age 81. An outstanding scientist, he had spent almost his entire career at Stanford, where he was renowned as irreverent, creative and unpretentious and as a leader, scholar and teacher with high values and standards. Students at all levels gained from their association with him, flourished and grew. He left behind an enviable legacy.

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George Gilbert 'Gil' Ashwell (1916 – 2014)


George Gilbert “Gil” Ashwell, a National Institutes of Health glycobiologist who won the ASBMB–Merck Award for outstanding contributions to biochemistry and molecular biology in 1984, died in late June in Bethesda, Md. He was 97. 

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Roy P. Mackal (1925 – 2013)


Roy P. Mackal, a retired associate professor at the University of Chicago who began his career studying the biochemistry of bacteriophage infection but who ended up dedicating most of his life to the search for creatures that may or may not exist, died Sept. 13, 2013. He was 88.

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Malcolm Daniel Lane Sr. (1930 – 2014)


Daniel M. Raben and Gerald W. Hart remember their friend and colleague Dan Lane in this Retrospective article.

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Richard Hanson (1935 – 2014)


In this Retrospective, colleagues pay tribute to Richard Hanson of Case Western Reserve University. Hanson served as president of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, as an associate editor for The Journal of Biological Chemistry and as an editorial advisory board for ASBMB Today. His positive disposition and seemingly unending concern for others will be missed.

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Ronald Winfield Estabrook (1926 – 2013)


Ronald “Ron” Winfield Estabrook, a world-renowned biochemist with a special knowledge of enzymatic reactions related to toxicology and steroid hormone biosynthesis, died in August at age 87. An expert in the field of cytochrome P450 biochemistry and biophysics, Estabrook helped transform the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, as it was called in his day, into a powerhouse.

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Tony Pawson (1952 – 2013)


Tony Pawson was said to have been on the Nobel short list for his work on signal transduction. John M. Kyriakis offers this tribute.

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Adolphus P. Toliver (1931 – 2013)


Adolphus P. Toliver, the Minority Access to Research Careers Branch chief from 1994 to 2012 at the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, died March 26. With his death, the scientific community has lost a great mentor, a change agent and a leading proponent of the minority programs at the National Institutes of Health.

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François Jacob (1920 – 2013)


The death of François Jacob at age 92 on April 19 should serve as a reminder in this age of 20-plus-person publications of the deep thinking and superb critical experimental skill of single individuals.

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Wm Wallace Cleland (1930 – 2013)


Perry A. Frey, George H. Reed and Dexter B. Northrop remember Wm Wallace "Mo" Cleland, professor of biochemistry at the University of Wisconsin Madison, who passed away in March.

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Kuan-Teh Jeang, (1958 – 2013)


Kuan-Teh Jeang, known as “Teh” among friends and colleagues, died Jan. 27 at the age of 54. Teh had worked at the National Institutes of Health for 27 years was chief of the Molecular Virology Section in the Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology.

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Robert J. Cotter (1943 – 2012)


We look back on the career of long-time Johns Hopkins professor Robert Cotter, who died on Jan. 21.

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Charles Crawford Sweeley Jr. (1930 – 2012)


Charles “Chuck” Sweeley Jr., who made major contributions to the fields of sphingolipids and mass spectrometry, died on Sept. 21 in Lansing, Mich., after a long battle with a rare form of bladder cancer. He was 82.

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Annemarie Weber (1923 – 2012)


Clara Franzini–Armstrong writes about Annemarie Weber, "a major contributor to the renaissance of muscle biology research in the 1950s to 1970s, when the components of the contractile machinery were identified; novel views of muscle contraction and regulation were elucidated; and principles of energy transduction, motility and intracellular signaling common to all cells were revealed."

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George F. Cahill Jr. (1927 – 2012)


Richard W. Hanson writes about George F. Cahill Jr., "one of the most imaginative scientists ever to have graced the field of metabolism."

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Paul M. Doty (1920 – 2011)


Jacques R. Fresco of Princeton University reflects on Doty's scientific accomplishments and his dedication to "the bringing together of scientists from both sides of the Iron Curtain."

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Har Gobind Khorana (1922 – 2011)


Robert D. Wells reflects on his postdoctoral mentor’s scientific achievements and spirit. He writes, in part, about Khorana’s upbringing amid poverty, “He repeatedly told stories of his early education from his teacher under a tree.”

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Masayasu Nomura (1927 – 2011)


The research community was saddened to hear of the death of Masayasu Nomura. Read an obituary relating his breakthroughs in ribosome research.

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Chris Raetz (1946 – 2011)


With Chris Raetz’s passing, the scientific world lost a polymath, and I lost my oldest friend. We met as freshmen at Yale University, two very nerdy chemistry majors yearning to excel and to get a date.

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Nathan Sharon (1925 – 2011)


Nathan Sharon, a lifelong ambassador for science and an accomplished glycoscientist, died June 17. He was 85.

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Saul Roseman (1921 – 2011)


Saul Roseman, professor emeritus of biology at The Johns Hopkins University, died peacefully July 2 after a career in science of nearly 70 years.

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William Nunn Lipscomb Jr. (1919 – 2011)


William Nunn Lipscomb Jr., an emeritus professor at Harvard University who won the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1976 for work on chemical bonding, passed away in April at age 91.

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Quentin H. Gibson (1918 – 2011)


Quentin H. Gibson, who is best known for his pioneering work on the kinetics of ligand binding to hemoglobins and the development of stopped flow and flash photolysis instruments, passed away on March 16, 2011 in Hanover, N.H., at the age of 92.

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Héctor Norberto Torres (1935 – 2011)


Torres had a distinguished career as one of Argentina’s leading biological chemists. 

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Eugene Goldwasser (1922 – 2010)


Eugene Goldwasser, the Alice Hogge and Arthur A. Baer professor emeritus of biochemistry and molecular biology at the University of Chicago, died Dec. 17. He was 88.

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Britton Chance (1913 – 2010)


Molecular biologist Britton Chance, whose multifaceted research advanced the understanding of biology, instrumentation and medicine, passed away on Nov. 16. He was 97.

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Harvey Itano (1920 – 2010)


Harvey Akio Itano, University of California, San Diego emeritus professor of pathology, died this past May at age 89. He was best known for his work, with Linus Pauling, on the molecular basis of sickle cell anemia.

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Dale J. Benos (1950 - 2010)


The ASBMB community was deeply saddened by the recent death of Journal of Biological Chemistry Associate Editor Dale Benos. He was an esteemed colleague and a dear friend to many. Benos served as chairman of the University of Alabama’s department of physiology and biophysics.

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Henry A. Lardy (1917 – 2010)


Henry Arnold Lardy, past president of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, died Aug. 4, 2010, from prostate cancer, a few days before his 93rd birthday.

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Bert Lester Vallee (1919–2010)


Bert Lester Vallee, the Paul Cabot professor of biochemical sciences emeritus at Harvard Medical School, passed away in his sleep on May 7, a few weeks short of his 91st birthday. He was especially well known for his identification of zinc in various metalloproteins and enzymes, and was considered by many to be the “father of metallobiochemistry.”

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Leon A. Heppel (1912–2010)


Leon A. Heppel, who carried out pioneering work in the areas of physiology and nucleic acid biochemistry, passed away on April 9 at the age of 97 in Ithaca, N.Y.

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Gary M. Bokoch (1954–2010)


Gary Bokoch passed away last January, after a long struggle with kidney and cardiovascular illness. It is a testament to his strength of character and selflessness that he kept his illness largely a secret for years while soldiering on, until he passed away at age 55.

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Marshall Nirenberg (1927–2010)


Marshall Warren Nirenberg, a Nobel Prize winning biochemist and geneticist, died Jan. 15. He was the first federal employee to win a Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine.

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Philip Siekevitz (1918–2009)


Philip Siekevitz, a pioneer in cell biology and a professor emeritus at The Rockefeller University, passed away Dec. 5 at age 91.

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Paul C. Zamecnik (1912 – 2009)


Paul C. Zamecnik, senior scientist at Massachusetts General Hospital and professor emeritus of oncologic medicine at Harvard Medical School, was among the most important biochemical scientists of the 20th century. He passed away Oct. 27, 2009, at the age of 96.

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Edwin G. Krebs (1918–2009)


Edwin G. Krebs, a giant of biochemistry in the 20th century, died Dec. 21 in Seattle. He was 91. His discovery of protein phosphorylation as a regulatory mechanism (with Edmond Fischer) touched all aspects of biomedical science and profoundly influenced therapeutic approaches now widely used in clinical care.

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Bernard L. Horecker (1914 – 2010)


ASBMB Past-president Bernard Leonard Horecker died this past October. He was well know for his contributions to elucidating the pentose phosphate pathway.

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Richard I. Gumport (1937–2009)


Reprinted with permission. The international biochemical community has lost a valued colleague with the death of Richard I. (Dick) Gumport in Chicago on Oct. 13. 

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Mildred Cohn (1913–2009)


Mildred Cohn, the first female president of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the first woman appointed to the Journal of Biological Chemistry editorial board, passed away on Oct. 12 at age 96.

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Charles Tanford (1921–2009)


Charles Tanford was one of the leaders of that remarkable generation of physical chemists who were drawn to biology in the decade following World War II. 

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Mahlon Hoagland (1921–2009)


Mahlon Hoagland, who contributed two seminal discoveries to the field of gene information flow, died on Sept. 18, 2009, at his home in Thetford, Vt., three weeks before his 88th birthday.

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Seymour Kaufman (1924–2009)


The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology recently lost another of its distinguished and longtime members. 

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