Why the bad taste?


In a recent issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, a research team described a novel mechanism for active drug accumulation and secretion in salivary gland epithelial cells that leads to the lingering bad taste of metformin, a frontline prescription drug used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. 

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Goodman on SOS error-prone DNA repair


For most people, nothing goes the way they plan it, and the most unexpected things are liable to happen at any time. One person who can attest to that is Myron F. Goodman, a professor at the University of Southern California. In his recent “Reflections” article for the Journal of Biological Chemistry, Goodman recounts the education and career path that led him to the discovery of error-prone DNA polymerase V and its unique regulation by RecA and ATP.

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Muscular disease in humans and cattle


A recent study in the Journal of Biological Chemistry about a muscular disease in cattle may offer clues about how to treat a similar disease found in humans.

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Author of the most-cited paper (ever)


In 1951, the Journal of Biological Chemistry published what would become the most-cited article in publishing history. We tracked down and interviewed the last known living author of that paper. Shortly after the paper was published, the author left science to raise her children. She's now 87 and quite good at bridge. Here's her story.

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Super microbes for biofuel production


Considering the high amounts of CO2 produced globally from burning fossil fuels, producing fuel from CO2 would be like turning lead into gold. Bacteria and yeast can carry out this process, but the more ethanol they produce, the more their ethanol-producing capabilities are limited. Researchers at Tianjin University and the Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in China recently reported in the journal Molecular & Cellular Proteomics a new target for genetic engineering that could increase microbial tolerance to ethanol.

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Function of Akt in atherosclerosis


Excess dietary fat and cholesterol in the Western diet push the homeostatic machinery beyond its physiological range. Under these conditions, macrophages become overwhelmed with cholesterol and undergo cell death, forming a plaque. Progression of this process leads to the growth of an atherosclerotic plaque and can result in stroke or heart attack. A recent study in the Journal of Lipid Research investigated the role of macrophage Akt isoforms in atherosclerosis.

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