Annual Meeting

Disease discoveries in three realms of the RNA world

RNA AND DISEASE
Anita Hopper Takahiro Ito
By Anita Hopper and Takahiro Ito
September 01, 2019

The RNA world is key to understanding gene expression in eukaryotes. This track will include three sessions describing exciting discoveries in RNA and disease: small noncoding RNAs, RNA modifications and RNA binding proteins.

Talks

  • tRNA: Splicing and subcellular dynamics — Anita Hopper, Ohio State University
  • The role of 3’tsRNAs in gene regulation — Mark Kay, Stanford University
  • The Piwi-piRNA pathway: A new paradigm in gene regulation — Haifan Lin, Yale University
  • piRNA biogenesis and function in Drosophila — Mikiko Siomi, University of Tokyo
  • RNA modification in cancer — Jianjun Chen, Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope
  • RNA modifications in health and disease — Tsutomu Suzuki, University of Tokyo
  • Acetylation of cytidine in messenger RNA regulates translation — Shalini Oberdoerffer, National Cancer Institute
  • tRNA quality control: Mechanisms, evolution, and implications for human disease — Eric Phizicky,University of Rochester Medical Center
  • RNA binding proteins in stem cells and cancer — Takahiro Ito, University of Georgia
  • The RNA exosome and genetic disease — Anita Corbett, Emory University
  • RNA, chromatin, and the coordinated control of gene expression — Tracy Johnson, University of California, Los Angeles
  • How mRNP composition determines mRNA fate — Guramrit Singh, Ohio State University

The session on small noncoding RNAs will focus on discoveries in model systems and humans regarding transfer RNAs, tRNA fragments and Piwi-interacting RNAs regarding their biogenesis, functions, and roles in development and disease.

After transcription, nearly every type of RNA becomes decorated with nucleoside modifications; the RNA modification session will describe novel roles these modifications play in decoding, RNA stability and RNA regulation and activities. It also will describe how these modifications function in normal and aberrant biological states.

RNA functions rely on interactions with RNA binding proteins; the session on RNA binding proteins will describe how RNA-protein interactions regulate chromatin structure, transcription and splicing and how the interactions are involved in development and disease.

Keywords: small noncoding RNAs, RNA modification, RNA binding proteins, tRNA, piRNA, miRNA, tRNA fragments, gene expression, stem cells, muscle cells, development, cancer.

Who should attend: everyone who wants to learn how the RNA world impinges on gene expression in health and disease.

Theme song: “Hello, Goodbye” by the Beatles, because the song reminds us of the life of RNAs in a cell.

This track is powered by different kinds of RNAs — obviously.

Anita Hopper
Anita Hopper

is a professor of molecular genetics at Ohio State University.

Takahiro Ito
Takahiro Ito

is an associate professor in the department of biochemistry and molecular biology at the University of Georgia.

Join the ASBMB Today mailing list

Sign up to get updates on articles, interviews and events.

Latest in Science

Science highlights or most popular articles

From the journals: JLR
Journal News

From the journals: JLR

January 28, 2020

Topics include fatty livers and hormones, how pathogens exploit lipid rafts and the lipoprotein–blood clot link.

Why you need more vitamin D in the winter
Wellness

Why you need more vitamin D
in the winter

January 26, 2020

With less exposure to sunlight in winter, adults should take in at least 600 international units per day of vitamin D from supplements or foods like oily fish, mushrooms and fortified dairy.

From the journals: MCP
Journal News

From the journals: MCP

January 25, 2020

Read about capturing a peptide link between migraines and opioid-induced sensitivity, profiling autologous body fluid exosomes and finding the RSK in melanoma protein interactions.

From the journals: JBC
Journal News

From the journals: JBC

January 24, 2020

Recent topics include misfolded tau proteins in Alzheimer’s disease, how enzymes trim peptides and how a parasite hijacks the immunity of its host.

Early immune response may improve cancer immunotherapies
Journal News

Early immune response may improve cancer immunotherapies

January 23, 2020

University of Illinois at Chicago researchers and colleagues report a new mechanism for detecting foreign material during early immune responses.

Do sperm offer the uterus a secret handshake?
Journal News

Do sperm offer the uterus
a secret handshake?

January 22, 2020

Why does it take 200 million sperm to fertilize a single egg? A female immune response is one reason. A molecular handshake may help sperm survive the bombardment.