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Chemistry Lab

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UC Santa Barbara, February 8, 2014

This workshop is designed to increase participant knowledge and use of student assessment techniques around the pre-identified biochemistry and molecular biology foundational concepts and skills and to actively engage participants in creating assessment tools and best practices.  This workshop is open to all undergraduate faculty, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students interested in undergraduate science education. 

University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA
West Campus Conference Center (see driving instructions below)
Saturday, February 8, 2014

Presenters and Facilitators: Duane Sears (University of California Santa Barbara), Ann Wright (Canisius College), and Vicky Minderhout (Seattle University) 

Workshop program
Welcome and overview  - Duane Sears, UCSB  (Video)
Effective teaching practices and assessment strategies that promote learning in undergraduate biochemistry - Vicky Minderhout, Seattle University (Video)
Backward design: A framework for building your course - Ann Wright, Canisius College (Video  


Learning Objectives - Foundational Concepts 

Initial Overall Learning Goal: Understand how nonsense, missense, and silent mutations affect characteristics of the resulting polypeptide.
Initial Specific Learning Objective: Students should be able to convert a DNA sequence into amino acid sequence and identify how mutations affect protein composition. Given a DNA sequence, students should translate into protein and identify effects of mutations on protein structure/function.
Alignment Table  Presentation Video (8 min)

Initial Overall Learning Goal: Students should understand and predict how a mutation can change the amino acid sequence of a gene product and how it defines a phenotype.  
Initial Specific Learning Objective:  Students should be able to explain how changes in nucleotide, amino acid sequence, transcript splicing can change gene expression and protein structure and function.
Alignment Table  Case Study Figure  Presentation Video (10 min)

Initial Overall Learning Goal: Students should be able to summarize the different levels of control (including reaction compartmentalization, gene expression, covalent modification of key enzymes, allosteric regulation of key enzymes, substrate availability and proteolytic cleavage) and relate these different levels of control with homeostasis.
Initial Specific Learning Objective: Students should be able to understand protein structures and functions and apply that to metabolic changes.
Alignment Table  Presentation Video (8 min)

Initial Overall Learning Goal: Students should be able to compare and contrast the potential ways in which the function of a macromolecule might be affected and be able to discuss examples of allosteric regulation, covalent regulation and gene level alterations of macromolecular structure/function.
Initial Specific Learning Objective: Students should be able to understand the different types of regulation and the mechanisms by which they alter activity. 
Alignment Table  Presentation Video (12 min) 

Initial Overall Learning Goal: Students should be able to compare and contrast the potential ways in which the function of a macromolecule might be affected and be able to discuss examples of allosteric regulation, covalent regulation, and gene level alterations of macromolecular structure/function.
Initial Specific Learning Objective:
1)Understand that the function of a protein is determined by its three-dimensional structure; 
2) Compare the ways in which allosteric, covalent, and gene-level protein regulation modify protein function via changing protein structure; 
3) Given a specific change in a protein structure, predict how the function of the protein may be affected. 
4) Suggest reasons why it may be advantageous for a cell to use allosteric and/or covalent modifications to regulate proteins, rather than levels of protein expression.
Alignment Table  Presentation Video (9 min)
 


Learning Objectives - Foundational Skills 

Initial Overall Learning Goal: Given an experimental observation, students should be able to develop a testable and falsifiable hypothesis.
Initial Specific Learning Objective: Students need to be able to describe the underlying scientific problem addressed by the data, interpret the experimental data, and then generate a new or alternative hypothesis based upon the experimental evidence.
Alignment Table  Presentation Video (12 min) 

Initial Overall Learning Goal: Given an experimental observation, students should be able to develop a testable and falsifiable hypothesis.
Initial Specific Learning Objective: Students should be able to represent data, identify controls and variables, and draw conclusions and hypotheses.
Alignment Table  Presentation Video (8 min)

Initial Overall Learning Goal: Students should be able to recall principles of chemical structure (i.e. covalent bonds, polarity, the hydrophobic effect, hydrogen bonds and other non-covalent interactions), and apply them in the context of the dynamic aspects of molecular structure. 
Initial Specific Learning Objectives: Students should be able to predict how changes to amino acid side chains might affect protein structure (in different regions of a protein i.e. interior/exterior).
Alignment Table  Presentation Video (5 min)

Initial Overall Learning Goal: Given a hypothesis students should be able to identify the appropriate experimental observations to be measured, as well as appropriate control variables. 
Initial Specific Learning Objectives: Students should integrate the hypothesis, background information and toolbox, to identify appropriate experimental techniques that achieve discrete, specific outcomes to determine necessity and/or sufficiency that will either 1. Disprove or 2. Corroborate the hypothesis in different approaches.
Alignment Table  Presentation Video (8 min)


Learning Objectives - Concepts from Allied Fields

Initial Overall Learning Goal: Students should be able to recall principles of chemical structure (i.e. covalent bonds, polarity, the hydrophobic effect, hydrogen bonds and other non-covalent interactions), and apply them in the context of the dynamic aspects of molecular structure. 
Initial Specific Learning Objectives: Students should be able to predict how changes to amino acid side chains might affect protein structure (in different regions of a protein i.e. interior/exterior).
Alignment Table  Presentation Video (7 min)

Initial Overall Learning Goal: Students should be able to compare and contrast the potential ways in which the function of a macromolecule might be affected and be able to discuss examples of allosteric regulation, covalent regulation and gene level alterations of macromolecular structure/function.
Initial Specific Learning Objectives: 1) Students should be able to define the different types of non-covalent and covalent interactions on a chemical level. They should provide examples (ionic, polar, hydrogen bonding, van der Waals, dipole, hydrophobic interactions, covalent) and rank them by their relative energetic strengths. 2). Students should be able to identify which of these interactions occur within and between different macromolecules and understand how they contribute to the different levels of molecular structure. They should be able to draw specific examples of bonding (see Objective 1 above) within and between macromolecules (proteins and DNA). 3) Students should apply this knowledge to propose how a macromolecule and a novel small molecule interact with one another. They should be able to refine a small molecule or recommend a mutation to improve the binding affinity.
Alignment Table  Presentation Video (10 min)