ASBMB History

VIDEO: John Abel
Lecture, 1930

ASBMB Centennial Videos

Herbert Tabor

Mildred Cohn

Arthur Kornberg

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ASBMB NOBEL PRIZE WINNERS

 

2015 – Aziz Sancar

Aziz Sancar of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, won the Nobel in chemistry with Tomas Lindahl at the Francis Crick Institute in London and Paul Modrich at Duke University School of Medicine "for having mapped, at a molecular level, how cells repair damaged DNA and safeguard the genetic information," the Nobel Assembly at the Karolinska Institutet said. Sancar was born in Turkey and earned his Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Dallas. He is a professor at UNC's medical school and an editorial board member for the ASBMB's Journal of Biological Chemistry. The prize announcement cited his work on the nucleotide excision repair pathway. He also won ASBMB's Bert and Natalie Vallee Award in Biomedical Science. Read more about Sancar's work in "Guardians of the genome" in ASBMB Today.

   

2015 – Tomas Lindahl

Tomas Lindahl at the Francis Crick Institute in London, along with Paul Modrich at Duke University School of Medicine and Aziz Sancar at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, won the Nobel in chemistry "for having mapped, at a molecular level, how cells repair damaged DNA and safeguard the genetic information," the Nobel Assembly at the Karolinska Institutet said. Lindahl was born in Sweden, earned his Ph.D. from the Karolinska Institutet and worked at the University of Gothenburg. Today he is an emeritus group leader and director of Cancer Research UK at Clare Hall Laboratory. The prize announcement cited his work on base excision repair. Read more about Lindahl's work in "Guardians of the genome" in ASBMB Today. (Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons user Holger Motzkau.)

   

2015 – Paul L. Modrich

Paul L. Modrich of Duke University School of Medicine, along with Tomas Lindahl at the Francis Crick Institute in London and Aziz Sancar at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, won the Nobel in chemistry "for having mapped, at a molecular level, how cells repair damaged DNA and safeguard the genetic information," the Nobel Assembly at the Karolinska Institutet said. Modrich was born in the U.S. and earned his Ph.D. from Stanford University. He is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator and a professor at Duke's medical school. The prize announcement cited his work on DNA mismatch repair. Read more about Modrich's work in "Guardians of the genome" in ASBMB Today. (Photo courtesy of Duke University.)
   

2015 – Satoshi Ōmura

Satoshi Ōmura of Kitasato University was one of three winners of the Nobel prize for physiology or medicine for their work on therapies for parasitic infections. Ōmura won half of the prize with William Campbell of Drew University for the discovery of avermectins, which "have radically lowered the incidence of river blindness and lymphatic filariasis," the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said in a statement. Ōmura was born in Japan and earned a master's degree from Tokyo Science University, a Ph.D. from the University of Tokyo and another Ph.D. from Tokyo University of Science. He was an emeritus professor at Kitasato University when he won the prize. The other half of the prize went to Tu Youyou, the first China-based scientist to win the award, for her discovery of the antimalarial drug artemisinin. Read more about Ōmura in "Combating parasitic diseases" in ASBMB Today.
   

2013 – Michael Levitt

Michael Levitt of the Stanford University School of Medicine shared the Nobel prize for chemistry "for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems," the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said in a statement. Levitt was born in South Africa, though his family was originally from Lithuania. He attended the University of Pretoria, King's College, the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel and the Laboratory of Molecular Biology at Cambridge, England. He shared the chemistry Nobel with Martin Karplus and Arieh Warshel. He won ASBMB's DeLano Award for Computational Biosciences. (Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons user Bengt Nyman.)
   

2013 – James Rothman

James Rothman of Yale University, along with Randy Schekman at the University of California, Berkeley, and Thomas Südhof at Stanford University, shared the Nobel for physiology or medicine "for their discoveries of machinery regulating vesicle traffic, a major transport system in our cells," said the Nobel Assembly. Rothman used biochemical approaches to establish the function of SNARE proteins. He demonstrated how different combinations of these proteins formed complexes to control cell fusion and properly delivered the cargo inside the vesicles to the right destination. "Together, Rothman, Schekman and Südhof have transformed the way we view transport of molecular cargo to specific destinations inside and outside the cell," Nobel officials said.
   

2013 – Randy W. Schekman

Randy Schekman at the University of California, Berkeley, along with James Rothman of Yale University and Thomas C. Südhof of Stanford University, won the Nobel in physiology or medicine "for their discoveries of machinery regulating vesicle traffic, a major transport system in our cells," said the Nobel Assembly in its announcement. Schekman used yeast genetics to identify more than 20 genes that are critical for vesicle trafficking. He showed that these genes could be classified into three categories of vesicle-transport regulation based on location: in the Golgi complex, in the endoplasmic reticulum and at the cell surface. Schekman earned his bachelor's from the University of California in Los Angeles, studied at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland and earned his Ph.D. under Arthur Kornberg at Stanford University.
   

2013 – Thomas C. Südhof

Thomas Südhof at Stanford University shared the Nobel prize in physiology or medicine with James Rothman of Yale University and Randy Schekman at the University of California, Berkeley, "for their discoveries of machinery regulating vesicle traffic, a major transport system in our cells," the Nobel Assembly said. Südhof, who also won the Lasker Award in Basic Medical Research, worked out the mechanism by which calcium ions trigger release of neurotransmitters and identified key regulatory components in the vesicle fusion machinery, such as complexin and synaptotagmin-1. Südhof, born in Germany, earned his Ph.D. at the University of Gottingen. He emigrated to the U.S. in 1983 and completed a postdoctoral stint at the University of Texas Health Science Center (now the UT Southwestern Medical Center) in Dallas with Michael Brown and Joseph Goldstein.
   

2012 – Brian Kobilka

Brian K. Kobilka of the Stanford University School of Medicine won the Nobel for chemistry for studies of G-protein-coupled receptors with

Robert J. Lefkowitz of Duke University Medical Center. Together, they helped explain how cells sense and react to chemical messages. That work provided the basis for about 40 percent of today's medications. He determined the structure of the activated Β2-adrenergic receptor in complex with its G protein and the structures of other GPCRs. Kobilka earned his bachelor's degree from the University of Minnesota and his M.D. from Yale University School of Medicine. He went on to complete a postdoctoral stint at Duke with Lefkowitz. He later moved to Stanford and became a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator. Kobilka was the winner of the ASBMB's Earl and Thressa Stadtman Distinguished Scientist Award.
   

2012 – Robert Lefkowitz

Robert J. Lefkowitz of Duke University Medical Center won the Nobel for chemistry with Brian K. Kobilka of the Stanford University School of Medicine for their studies of G-protein-coupled receptors. Their early work partially explained how cells sense and react to chemical messages, which provided the basis for about 40 percent of today's drugs. Lefkowitz was born in The Bronx to a family with Polish roots.. He earned his bachelor's degree at Columbia College and his M.D. from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. He worked at the National Institutes of Health for two years and later moved to Duke. Lefkowitz was the first winner of the ASBMB Herb Tabor Lectureship in 2004.
   
 

More Nobel-winning ASBMB members

2009 – Thomas A. Steitz

2009 – Carol W. Greider

2007 – Mario Renato Capecchi

2006 – Roger D. Kornberg

2004 – Richard Axel

2003 – Roderick MacKinnon

2003 – Peter Agre

2002 – H. Robert Horvitz

2002 – Sydney Brenner

2002 – Paul Greengard

1999 – Günter Blobel

1998 – Louis J. Ignarro

1998 – Robert F. Furchgott

1997 – Stanley B. Prusiner

1997 – Paul D. Boyer

1994 – Martin Rodbell

1994 – Alfred G. Gilman

1993 – Michael Smith

1993 – Phillip A. Sharp

1993 – Richard J. Roberts

1992 – Edwin G. Krebs

1992 – Edmond H. Fischer

1989 – Harold E. Varmus

1989 – Thomas R. Cech

1989 – J. Michael Bishop

1989 – Sidney Altman

1988 – Robert Huber

1988 – George H. Hitchings

1988 – Gertrude B. Elion

1986 – Stanley Cohen

1985 – Joseph L. Goldstein

1985 – Michael S. Brown

 

1984 – R. Bruce Merrifield

1982 – Bengt Ingemar Samuelsson

1982 – Sune Bergström

1980 – Walter Gilbert

1980 – Paul Berg

1978 – Hamilton O. Smith

1978 – Daniel Nathans

1977 – Andrew V. Schally

1976 – William N. Lipscomb Jr.

1975 – Vladimir Prelog

1975 – David Baltimore

1974 – Christian René de Duve

1972 – William H. Stein

1972 – Rodney R. Porter

1972 – Stanford Moore

1972 – Gerald M. Edelman

1972 – Christian B. Anfinsen

1971 – Earl W. Sutherland

1970 – Luis F. Leloir

1970 – Julius Axelrod

1969 – Salvador E. Luria

1968 – Marshall W. Nirenberg

1968 – Har Gobind Khorana

1968 – Robert W. Holley

1967 – George Wald

1967 – Manfred Eigen

1967 – Jacques L. Monod

1965 – André M. Lwoff

1964 – Feodor Lynen

1964 – Dorothy C. Hodgkin

1964 – Konrad E. Bloch

1962 – Maurice H. F. Wilkins

 

1962 – James D. Watson

1962 – Max F. Perutz

1962 – John C. Kendrew

1962 – Francis H. C. Crick

1961 – Melvin Calvin

1959 – Severo Ochoa

1959 – Arthur Kornberg

1958 – Edward L. Tatum

1958 – Frederick Sanger

1958 – Joshua Lederberg

1957 – Alexander Todd

1955 – Hugo Theorell

1955 – Vincent du Vigneaud

1955 – Fitz A. Lipmann

1953 – Hans A. Krebs

1952 – Richard L. M. Synge

1952 – Archer J. P. Martin

1950 – Tadeus Reichstein

1950 – Edward C. Kendall

1948 – Arne W. K. Tiselius

1947 – Gerty T. Cori

1947 – Carl F. Cori

1946 – James B. Sumner

1946 – Wendell M. Stanley

1946 – John H. Northrop

1945 – Artturi I. Virtanen

1943 – Edward A. Doisy Sr.

1943 – Henrik Dam

1939 – Leopold Ruzicka

1931 – Otto H. Warburg

1926 – Theodor Svedberg

1922 – Otto Meyerhof