An open letter to our contributors


Angela Hopp, ASBMB Today's editor, gives thanks to the volunteer writers who keep the magazine going.

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An open letter to a professor who comforted me


ASBMB Today science writer Rajendrani Mukhopadhyay gives thanks to someone who helped her navigate her first serious academic failure.

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Open letter to the incoming cohort of graduate students


In the latest piece of our "Open Letters" series, Kelly Hallstrom offers some advice to those just beginning Ph.D. training this fall. She writes, in part: "As much as you may think you’re doing everything right, it’s easy to develop tunnel vision and to forget to approach your work from different perspectives. This may cause you to miss an alternative explanation or key experiment. Without those people in the crowd to point out your errors, your work (and the science behind it) can’t improve."

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An open letter from a not-so-good Brahmin boy


Akshat Sharma’s open letter is adapted from an actual letter he sent while applying to a creative-writing program before deciding to pursue his Ph.D. after all.

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An open letter to press officers who won’t promote unembargoed research papers


While this letter is addressed to press officers who won’t promote research papers that cannot be embargoed, it raises an important issue that scientists should understand. A news embargo ensures that certain information is not made public until an agreed upon time. Some scholarly publishers use embargoes to keep newly accepted research papers out of the public sphere until they are published, allowing only a handful of people (such as authors, press officers and journalists) to see the material in the interim. One often-cited aim is to facilitate thorough reporting of the research. But more and more publishers today post all accepted papers online immediately. Most press officers will still promote those papers to the media, even though the news cannot be embargoed. But others will not.

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An open letter to my younger self, an aspiring graduate student in the sciences


In this month’s open letter, Paul, a first-year radiation oncology postdoctoral fellow at The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, writes to his younger self.

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A belated love letter to my first-grade science teacher


Excerpt: "You charged onward when one-third of the class was picking their noses and the girls were busy combing each other’s hair. You knew sooner or later you would corral our attention, because you had a magic show in store for us."

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Thank God for overlapping genes


In this installment of our “Open Letters” series, Harvey J. Armbrecht writes, in part: “At the personal level, I am thankful for overlapping genes because they remind me of the beauty of the things we biochemists study.”

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