Raising a rainbow of scientists


In this essay, Ashley Warfield–Oyirifi lays out a plan to situate biochemistry and molecular biology in their social context to retain students of color.

thumb nail

Six questions for three presidents


College and university leaders from underrepresented groups talk about how a background in science serves them at the academic helm.

thumb nail

African-American men in the molecular biosciences


This three-part series explores mentoring, underrepresentation and advice for the future through interviews with five African-American men, including two students, two faculty members and a researcher in the biotechnology industry.

thumb nail

Addressing the tangled roots of health disparities


Life scientists forge collaborations to rethink old questions, train young researchers and engage diverse communities.

thumb nail

Essay: Colorblindness as ideology


Colorblindness is a popular behavior model that seems to reflect pro-diversity intentions, but Kecia Thomas explains how its practice suppresses diversity and elevates sameness.

thumb nail

The importance of mentoring


In the first essay of a three-part series, Suzanne Barbour talks to five black men about their experiences in the molecular biosciences.

thumb nail

Managing underrepresentation in science


In the second installment of her three-part series on African-American men in the biosciences, Suzanne Barbour writes about the intersection of politics, science and race. Her five interviewees talk about the impact of race on their careers and their quest for for career–life balance.

thumb nail

Perspectives for the future


In the final installment of her three-part series, Suzanne Barbour asks five African-American men studying and working in the molecular biosciences to provide words of wisdom for those who would follow in their footsteps.

thumb nail

A hero for me


Kyeorda Kemp writes about Charles Drew, whose research in the field of blood transfusion resulted in improved techniques for blood storage and led to the development of blood banks that saved thousands of lives during World War II.

thumb nail

Special section: Diversity and inclusion matters


The editors of ASBMB Today consider the need for an ongoing discussion about diversity and inclusion in biochemistry and molecular biology and encourage readers to share their thoughts.

thumb nail

Editor's note


Johns Hopkins University announces plans to name a building after Henrietta Lacks, almost 70 years after her cells were removed during a biopsy and used for research without her permission.

thumb nail

Opening my mind


Andrew Hollebach at Louisiana State University shares his process of becoming open about his own sexuality and learning to appreciate the incredible diversity of the LGBT and DSD community as he works within academia to educate others.

thumb nail

Questioning the impact of role models


Evidence suggests that a portion of young female and minority students who are exposed to diverse role models in the sciences actually become less interested and confident in their own scientific abilities. Takita Felder Sumter examines this conundrum and encourages a closer examination of what can be done to attract and retain underrepresented minorities in research and academic science.

thumb nail

Special section: Diversity and inclusion matters


The editors of ASBMB Today consider the need for an ongoing discussion about diversity and inclusion in biochemistry and molecular biology and encourage readers to share their thoughts.

thumb nail

Where do we go from here?


Deputy chair of the ASBMB Minority Affairs Committee offers strategies to help broaden the inclusion of underrepresented minorities in science, technology, engineering, and math fields.

thumb nail

Your voices on diversity & inclusion matters


Our members and affiliates to tell us how they perceive the state of diversity and inclusion — the lay of the land, so to speak — in the field of biochemistry and molecular biology.

thumb nail

Education: Early support goes a long way


Austin Maduka, a recipient of the ASBMB's Marion B. Sewer Distinguished Scholarship for Undergraduates, writes about why he engages in education and outreach activities..

thumb nail

Solving the faculty diversity problem


It’s possible to diversify the workforce within a single tenure cycle. The solution is in hiring decisions.

thumb nail

Bringing scientific rigor to issues of diversity


ASBMB's chief science correspondent, Rajendrani Mukhopadhyay, conducts a rare Q&A with Hannah Valantine, the first chief officer for scientific workforce diversity at the National Institutes of Health.

thumb nail

Imposter syndrome and diversity students


Two graduate students and a professor recount their encounters with imposter syndrome.

thumb nail

Sharing the whole HeLa genome


An agreement between the Lacks family and the National Institutes of Health is benefiting researchers.

thumb nail

Remembering Tuskegee


Squire Booker traces the historical steps that led to the tragic, 40-year-long, government-sponsored Tuskegee syphilis study as well as the changes in public health and medical research policy that have come about as a result.

thumb nail

Great achievements in science and technology in ancient Africa


Sydella Blatch writes about the contributions to science and technology by ancient Africans. She writes, in part, "While the remarkable black civilization in Egypt remains alluring, there was sophistication and impressive inventions throughout ancient sub-Saharan Africa as well."

thumb nail

In need of a new narrative


Natasha C. Brooks, a member of the ASBMB's Minority Affairs Committee, writes, "Unfortunately, narratives intended to perpetuate fear for past transgressions, those highlighting health disparities and those regarding minority scientists as exceptional and rare have become the norm. The existing narratives perpetuate the notion that science is 1) perpetrated against them and 2) not for them."

thumb nail