April 2013
 

Goldberg wins Alice and C.C. Wang Award in Molecular Parasitology


Daniel Goldberg, professor of medicine and molecular microbiology and co-chief of the division of infectious diseases at Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, is the winner of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology’s Alice and C.C. Wang Award in Molecular Parasitology. The award is given to investigators who are making revolutionary contributions to the field. Goldberg was nominated for his contributions to our understanding of the biology of Plasmodium food vacuoles, primarily in Plasmodium falciparum, and the roles of proteases in the survival of parasites.

 

Shan honored for work uncovering mechanisms of signal recognition particle


The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology has named Shu-ou Shan of the California Institute of Technology the winner of the society’s Young Investigator Award for 2013. Shan has led extensive research concerning the specific protein-targeting mechanisms of the signal recognition particle, or SRP, the protein-RNA complex responsible for guiding polypeptide chains from the ribosome to the eukaryotic endoplasmic reticulum or the bacterial plasma membrane during protein biosynthesis.

 

Ntambi honored for unique contributions to education


James Mukasa Ntambi, professor of biochemistry and of nutritional sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is the winner of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Award for Exemplary Contributions to Education. In addition to teaching the metabolism section of the large undergraduate course in general biochemistry, Ntambi teaches a unique Uganda study abroad course called International Health and Nutrition. “The central concept of this course is that UW-Madison undergraduates apply the biochemistry they learn in the classroom to real-world problems,” Ntmabi explained.

 

Doudna wins new Mildred Cohn award


Jennifer A. Doudna is the inaugural recipient of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Mildred Cohn Award in Biological Chemistry. Doudna has been described by those who nominated her for the award as “an outstanding scientist,” “a unique scholar,” “an exceptionally creative and productive scientist,” “a great speaker” and “an accomplished educator.” Beyond the superlatives, Doudna’s scientific career speaks for itself. Jack Szostak, her thesis adviser at Harvard University, remarks, “Her thesis work spanned synthetic chemistry, molecular biology and genetics, and was published in 10 papers, including three in Science and Nature.”

 

Walther lauded as ‘hands down the most talented young investigator in lipid biology’


Tobias Walther, associate professor at the Yale School of Medicine, is the winner of the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology’s 2013 Walter A. Shaw Young Investigator Award in Lipid Research. Throughout his career, Walther has worked on numerous cell biology problems, but a main focus is on cellular lipid droplets. His work on the subject has helped to propel lipid droplets into an important interest in cell biology with vast implications in multiple fields.

 

Berman recognized for her efforts in removing barriers to data access


Helen Berman has won the 2013 DeLano Award for Computational Biosciences from the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Berman, a professor at Rutgers University and co-founder of the Protein Data Bank, is being honored for her efforts to make data universally available.

 

Hartl, Horwich share Tabor Research Award for work with chaperone proteins


F. Ulrich Hartl of the Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry and Arthur Horwich of the Yale School of Medicine have won the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology’s Herbert Tabor Research Award for pioneering work in the field of protein folding.

 

Blumberg wins Kirschstein diversity award for work with the hearing impaired


The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology has named Peter M. Blumberg of the National Institutes of Health the winner of the 2013 Ruth Kirschstein Diversity in Science Award. The award recognizes outstanding scientists who show a strong commitment to mentoring and encouraging underrepresented minorities to enter the sciences. Blumberg has earned this award by reaching out to the deaf community and recruiting deaf students into his lab to train them for scientific careers.

 

Henry wins the Avanti award for use of yeast genetics in lipid research


The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology has named Susan A. Henry, professor and dean emerita at Cornell University, winner of the 2013 Avanti Award in Lipids. Henry is being recognized for her contributions outlining the genetics of control of phospholipid metabolism in yeast.

 

Renowned researcher Uhlenbeck wins Lipmann lectureship for work on RNA biochemistry


The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology has awarded Olke Uhlenbeck, an emeritus professor at Northwestern University, the Fritz Lipmann Lectureship. Awarded every two years, this lectureship recognizes investigators who contribute to the conceptual advancements of biochemistry, bioenergetics and molecular biology.

 

Malhotra recognized with ASBMB-Merck Award


Vivek Malhotra, chairman of the cell and developmental biology program at the Centre for Genomic Regulation in Barcelona, has been named the winner of the 2013 American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology-Merck Award for his studies in understanding the mechanisms and machinery of membrane trafficking and Golgi function and biogenesis.

 

Dikic honored for his ‘unselfish commitment to training and to the advancement of the scientific community’


Ivan Dikic, professor and chairman of the Institute of Biochemistry II at Goethe University, is the winner of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology’s William C. Rose Award this year.

 

Kobilka lauded for Nobel-winning studies of GPCRs


Nobel laureate Brian Kobilka, professor and chairman of the molecular and cellular physiology department at Stanford University School of Medicine, won the 2013 Earl and Thressa Stadtman Distinguished Scientist Award from the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

 

New award established in memory of Bert and N. Kuggie Vallee


The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology is now accepting nominations for a new annual award: the Bert and N. Kuggie Vallee Award in Biomedical Science. The $10,000 award, which will recognize outstanding accomplishments in basic biomedical research, is supported by the Vallee Foundation, established in 1996 by biochemist Bert Vallee and his wife, Natalie, who was better known as Kuggie.

found= true2273