October 2011

MCP launches sponsored lectures

Indeed, by a variety of metrics and peer recognition, MCP is arguably the leading journal in this area and is quite deserving of its position as one of the 100 most influential journals in biology (2). However, it is important to remember that the successes of the journal are the result of the efforts of a large number of people, starting with the associate editors and the members of the editorial board and including all the authors and scientists who have chosen to publish their outstanding work in the journal. The content of the journal is, in the final analysis, what dictates its quality. It has had 10 excellent years in this regard, and we look forward to the next decade and even better things.

As part of our 10th anniversary celebration, the editors of MCP are planning to introduce some new features and policies that we feel will not only maintain our tradition of excellence but also keep us fresh and innovative. One such feature is the introduction of MCP-sponsored lectures in germane meetings and symposia, which we initiated in August at the 10th International Symposium on Mass Spectrometry in the Health and Life Sciences in San Francisco and continued in September at the 10th HUPO Annual World Congress in Geneva. The organizers of the meeting selected the lecturers in each case, and two of the leading practitioners of the proteomic art kicked off this program: Matthias Mann and Ruedi Aebersold.

 

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Matthias Mann

Matthias Mann received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees at the University of Gottingen and his doctoral degree from Yale University under the direction of John Fenn, who received the Nobel Prize for chemistry for the development of electrospray ionization (to which Mann contributed). Mann did postdoctoral work at the University of Southern Denmark in Odense with Peter Roepstorff and held a professorship at the same university subsequently.

In between these appointments, he was a group leader at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg.  During his stay at that institution, he was instrumental in developing high-throughput protein identifications by mass spectrometry that were key to the advance of proteomics. In 2005, he became a director at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried (outside Munich), and he also holds an appointment at the University of Copenhagen.

Mann is an acknowledged leader and pioneer in the development of mass-spectrometric-based proteomics and has received numerous prizes and recognition for his extensive achievements. He and his co-workers have developed many important analytical techniques, including stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC labeling) (published in MCP) for quantifying MS data (3).  He is particularly known for large-scale identifications of proteins and PTMs and the analysis of important complexes and samples of clinical significance. He has published more than 400 research articles (38 of which have appeared in MCP); he is also a member of the MCP editorial board. His keynote MCP lecture for the International Symposium on Mass Spectrometry in the Health and Life Sciences was titled “Technology and Applications of Deep Proteome Sequencing” and covered new developments in mass-spectrometric-based technologies and how these improvements are placing proteomics on a par with genomics in terms of sample coverage.

 

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Ruedi Aebersold

Ruedi Aebersold received his formal training at the Biocenter at the University of Basel and did postdoctoral research at the California Institute of Technology with Lee Hood. He then held academic appointments at the University of British Columbia and the University of Washington, where he and his colleagues worked on a wide variety of proteins and made major contributions to their micro-characterization. 

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