September 2011

ASBMB annual award winners named

award_George-M_carmanGeorge M. Carman, professor and director of the Center for Lipid Research at Rutgers University, won the Avanti Award in Lipids. Carman, an associate editor for the Journal of Biological Chemistry, has made many contributions to the understanding of the enzymology and metabolism of phospholipids, and most recently, his laboratory discovered the molecular function of the fat-regulating protein lipin as a phosphatidic acid phosphatase enzyme.

 

award_PeterEspenshadePeter Espenshade, an associate professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, won the Avanti Young Investigator Award in Lipid Research. The award recognizes outstanding research contributions in the area of lipids by young investigators with no more than 15 years of experience since receiving their doctoral degrees. Espenshade researches the basic mechanisms of cholesterol sensing and has developed the simple eukaryotic cell S. pombe as an accessible genetic model for the investigation of cholesterol homeostasis and is pursing the pathways controlling this fundamental cell process.

award_FarnhamPeggy Farnham, a professor at the University of Southern California, won the Herbert A. Sober Lectureship. The award, issued every other year, recognizes outstanding biochemical and molecular biological research with particular emphasis on development of methods and techniques to aid in research. Farnham studies chromatin regulation and its control of transcription-factor binding and function, and she is a pioneer in the development of the chromatin immunoprecipitation technique.

 

award_Xiaodong-WangXiaodong Wang, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute alumni investigator and researcher at the National Institute of Biological Sciences in Beijing, has been named the winner of the ASBMB-Merck Award. This award recognizes outstanding contributions to research in biochemistry and molecular biology. Wang studies the functions of cell organelles and is credited with the discovery of a new function of mitochondria in programmed cell death.

 

award_David-SabatiniDavid Sabatini, an associate professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, won the Earl and Thressa Stadtman Scholar Award, given to a scientist with 10 or fewer years of post-postdoctoral experience, including medical residency and fellowship. Sabatini is a leader in the ongoing elucidation of the mTOR pathway, a master regulator of growth. He is also a member of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research.

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