January 2011

George Stark to give 2011 annual meeting opening lecture

George R. Stark, the distinguished scientist of the Cleveland Clinic’s Lerner Research Institute and emeritus professor of genetics at Case Western Reserve University, is the recipient of the society’s 2011 Herbert Tabor/Journal of Biological Chemistry lectureship.

Stark

“It is a very special honor to receive any award named for Herb Tabor. I feel privileged, but also humbled, to join the outstanding group of biochemists who have received the Tabor award previously.” – GEORGE R. STARK


The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology has announced that George R. Stark, the distinguished scientist of the Cleveland Clinic’s Lerner Research Institute and emeritus professor of genetics at Case Western Reserve University, is the recipient of the society’s 2011 Herbert Tabor/Journal of Biological Chemistry lectureship.

The lectureship recognizes outstanding lifetime scientific achievements and was established to honor the many contributions of Herbert Tabor to both the society and the journal, for which he has served as editor for nearly 40 years.

Stark will be the eighth person so honored, joining a luminous group of recipients that includes the 2010 awardee, Nobel laureate Phillip A. Sharp.

“George Stark has been a leader and pioneer in basic and applied research,” said Charles E. Samuel, the Charles A. Storke II professor of biochemistry and virology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a longtime colleague of Stark’s. “He has been a superb scientist personifying many of the characteristics of Herb Tabor. Recognition with our lectureship would be a most fitting tribute to Stark’s numerous seminal contributions.”

Those contributions span many fields, influencing the understanding not only of basic biochemistry but also the specialized fields of gene regulation and cell signaling, which have further implications for immunity and cancer. Those landmark discoveries began during his early work on enzyme mechanisms and protein chemistry, at which time he developed the foundational Northern and Western techniques that detect specific nucleic acids and proteins, respectively.

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