December 2010

Remembering Richard E. Pagano

Richard E. Pagano passed away recently at age 66. Pagano was known for his innovative application of lipid biophysics and imaging technology to understanding the molecular organization of cell membrane lipids.


Photo credit: David Marks

Richard E. “Dick” Pagano, a pioneer scientist in lipid cell biology, recently died at the age of 66. At the time, he was the head of a vibrant and productive laboratory in the department of biochemistry and molecular biology at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Rochester, Minn. An overarching theme of Dick’s research for the past 45 years was the innovative application of lipid biophysics and imaging technology to understanding the molecular organization of cell membrane lipids.

Dick trained with Thomas E. Thompson at the University of Virginia, where he received his doctoral degree in biophysics, studying ion permeability in model membranes. He continued to work with model membrane systems during his postdoctoral work with Norman L. Gershfeld at the National Institutes of Health and then with Israel R. Miller at the Weizmann Institute. During a brief fellowship in Dennis Chapman’s lab at the University of Sheffield, Dick performed some of the first direct measurements confirming that gel and liquid phases could coexist in the same membrane.

Dick started his own lab in 1972 at the Carnegie Institution department of embryology in Baltimore, Md., where he worked for more than two decades before moving to the Mayo Clinic. It was at Carnegie that Dick first applied his experience using model membranes to addressing the central and largely unanswered questions in the cell biology of membrane lipids. The combination of lipid biophysical and cell biological approaches proved extremely fruitful. Dick’s initial work elucidated mechanisms of interaction between artificial membrane vesicles and cells, which has relevance to the pharmacologic use of liposomes. His work also provided an early method of introducing labeled lipids into the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane. Ultimately, the creative use of lipid probes incorporated into cell membranes to study lipid metabolism and trafficking would become the signature of Dick’s scientific career.

Dick pioneered the use of lipids in which a native acyl chain was replaced with a short chain fluorescent analogue that readily incorporated into cell membranes and faithfully mimicked the behavior of the natural lipid equivalent. The Pagano lab created dozens of fluorescent lipid probes, which enabled several key advances, including tracking membrane lipid transport, labeling the Golgi apparatus of living cells, identifying intracellular compartments involved in sphingolipid metabolism, measuring transbilayer movement of aminophospholipids and demonstrating that sphingolipids regulate several membrane transport pathways.

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COMMENTS:

It was a shock to learn of Richard Pagano's death. I located--and then contacted--Richard at Mayo a number of years back, since we both had a number of things in common, having spent our childhood years in San Antonio, Texas. Our parents were close friends. Richard's gift of discipline was likely inherited from his lovely parents. His parents honored and supported Richard's keen interest in science. He was the oldest of 3 siblings. He was always studious and serious, and rarely joined with his brothers Gordon and Arthur when we gathered for social events. FYI Richard's father, Emile Pagano, a very gifted flutist, later moved his family from San Antonio to L.Island & besides teaching, played for the Met Opera. His mother was one of the warmest people I recall from childhood. May Richard rest in peace, & may the wonderful memories of his life continue to inspire his colleagues, friends, and family. Isabel Ellis, MSW NIAAA, NIH

 

 

I was chair of the first Sphingolipid Gordon Conference in 1992 and of course Dick was a key participant. Our original Hotel on Kuaui was totally destroyed by a cyclone that summer but we were able to relocate to the Turtle Head Hilton for the November meeting, except that MacDonalds had booked the lecture theatre for Wednesday morning so we had to meet in the restaurant. Dick was the first speaker that morning and despite competition from the surfing contest going on outside was able with good humor to hold the audience spellbound as he led us through the fluorescent intricacies of sphingolipid trafficking. He will be sorely missed indeed. Glyn Dawson, Chicago.

 

I am so sorry to learn of Dick's passing. He was truly a gentleman and a scholar. He will be missed, but his contributions will live on. Howard Goldfine, Ph.D.

 

 

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