December 2010

2010 William C. Rose Award Goes to Melissa J. Moore

Melissa J. Moore, a professor at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, has been named the winner of ASBMB's 2011 William C. Rose Award. (Titled "Melissa J. Moore Recognized for Research and Mentoring" in print version.)

Melissa J. Moore

"It’s truly an honor to be recognized for work that I so completely enjoy doing. Everyone should be so lucky to have such a compelling job, dedicated team and supportive community." - MELISSA J. MOORE


The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology has named Melissa J. Moore, a professor at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, the winner of the society’s 2011 William C. Rose Award.

Moore, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, is noted for her work with gene splicing and messenger RNA. She was nominated for the award in recognition of her outstanding contributions to biochemical and molecular biological research and her demonstrated commitment to the training of younger scientists.

“Melissa Moore is a paradigm for the Rose Award,” said UMMS professor and chairman C. Robert Matthews in nominating Moore. “She is an outstanding scientist, a caring mentor and a terrific colleague. When she perceives a need – from her students, her colleagues or her institution— she always steps forward to fill that need.”

Moore, who arrived at UMMS only a few years ago and today is a co-director of its RNA Therapeutics Institute, has initiated and led several programs there that will affect the development of translational research, Matthews said.

Intrigued by enzymes while working on her undergraduate thesis at the College of William and Mary, the Virginia native applied to only one school for graduate studies— the Massachusetts Institute of Technology— and went on to earn her doctorate in biological chemistry and complete postdoctoral research there. Under the supervision of Nobel laureate Phillip A. Sharp, she focused on RNA metabolism and developed a widely adopted technique for manipulating RNA molecules. Soon thereafter, she joined Brandeis University as a faculty member.

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