Recent Issues of ASBMB Today

ASBMBToday_201502

February   2015


Do extracellular vesicles containing RNA represent a new mode for cellular communication? In the February issue, science writer Rajendrani Mukhopadhyay explores if these vesicles challenge the dogma that RNA strictly is an intracellular molecule. Our Defying Sterotypes series continues with an interview with runner Nick Symmonds, who put science aside to chase his dream of going to the Olympics. We also have a feature on how deaf scientists navigate the hearing scientific community. In his column this month, ASBMB President Steve McKnight writes about the forthcoming ASBMB annual meeting in Boston. For our "Generations" and "Hobbies" series, Maggie Kuo writes about Jackie Corbin's favorite pastime and how a research team at Case Western Reserve University generated a mouse model for psoriasis. Read the issue!

ASBMBToday_201501

January   2015


In the January issue, our Defying Sterotypes series continues with two stories about scientists working in Hollywood. We also have a Q&A with Dennis Voelker, a new associate editor for the Journal of Biological Chemistry. ASBMB President Steve McKnight writes about the work of Zhijian “James” Chen, a plenary lecturer at the forthcoming ASBMB annual meeting in Boston and the winner of the ASBMB–Merck award. Aditi Dubey kicks off our "Hobbies" series with a poem about a beverage popular among graduate students. ASBMB Today science writer Rajendrani Mukhopadhyay writes about George Todaro to launch our "Generations" series. Andrew D. Hollenbach writes about how he got where he is today. We hope you enjoy the January issue!

ASBMBToday_201412

December   2014


Our Defying Stereotypes series continues with  two stories about women who've found ways to professionally blend science and art. Our science writer reports on how Smithsonian scientists are trying to figure out some little details that will make a big difference in their genomic research endeavor. ASBMB President Steve McKnight tells a story about "a triumph of science." Our intern, Maggie Kuo, profiles a graduate student who regularly appears on shows like "The View" to inspire the public to embrace and experiment with science. And, for those of you still doing holiday shopping, we scoured CafePress to find the best mugs for scientists.