JBC Thematic Minireview Series: Molecular Mechanisms of Synaptic Plasticity

October 15, 2015 — High fidelity synaptic communication between subsets of neurons in specific circuits is required for most human behaviors, and is often disrupted in neuropsychiatric disorders. This series of mini-reviews focuses on recent advances in our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that control "synaptic plasticity" leading to changes in overall neuronal circuit activity, resulting in behavioral modifications.

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JBC Thematic Minireview Series: Protein Interactions, Structures, and Networks

September 10, 2015 —  Protein interactions are fundamental to the proper functioning of cells, and aberrant formation or regulation of protein interactions is at the heart of many diseases, including cancer. The advancement of methods to study the identity, function, and regulation of protein complexes makes possible the understanding of how those complexes malfunction in human diseases. This series of minireviews highlights methodological advances and how they have been applied in novel ways to explore the function and regulation of pathways and dynamic networks in cells.

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JBC Thematic Series - Metals in Biology: alpha-Ketoglutarate and Iron Dependent Dioxygenases

July 14, 2015 — Four Minireviews deal with aspects of the α-ketoglutarate/iron dependent dioxygenases in this eighth Thematic Series on Metals in Biology. The Minireviews cover a general introduction and synopsis of the current understanding of mechanisms of catalysis, the roles of these dioxygenases in post-translational protein modification and de-modification, the roles of the ten-eleven translocation (Tet) dioxygenases in the modification of methylated bases (5mC, T) in DNA relevant to epigenetic mechanisms, and the roles of the AlkB-related dioxygenases in the repair of damaged DNA and RNA.

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JBC Thematic Series - New Directions in G Protein-Coupled Receptor Pharmacology

July 14, 2015 — Over the past half century, The Journal of Biological Chemistry has been the venue for many landmark publications on the topic of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs, also known as 7 transmembrane receptors). The GPCR superfamily in humans is comprised of about 800 members, and is the target of about one third of all pharmaceuticals. Most of these drugs target a very small subset of GPCRs, and do so by mimicking or competing with endogenous hormones and neurotransmitters. This thematic mini-review series examines some emerging trends in GPCR drug discovery.

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