2014 ASBMB Annual Meeting Program

ASBMB Award & Plenary Lectures
EB2014 Program Search Tool/Online Itinerary Builder/View Presentation Abstracts  Now Available  
 

Click here to view the ASBMB program at-a-glance.
 

ALICE AND C.C. WANG AWARD IN MOLECULAR PARASITOLOGY AND SYMPOSIUM
 Stuart 

Ken Stuart, Seattle Biomedical Research Institute 
RNA editing in trypanosomal parasites
Monday, April 28, 3:45 pm - 6:00 pm, Convention Center, Room 6C 1A
 View the award symposium program.

   
   
ASBMB Annual Meeting Opening Lecture
HERBERT TABOR RESEARCH AWARD

 Stillman 

Bruce W. Stillman,  Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
Biochemical Studies on Replication of the Genome in Eukaryotes
Saturday, April 26, 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm, San Diego Marriott Marquis Hotel, North Tower, Marriott Hall 4
Opening Reception immediately follows lecture in Marriott Hall 3
 

   
    
ASBMB AWARD FOR EXEMPLARY CONTRIBUTIONS TO EDUCATION
 White 

Harold B. White, III, University of Delaware
Stimulating attitudes of inquiry  
Sunday, April 27, 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm, Convention Center, Room 6A
Undergraduate student poster competition awards presented during this lecture.

   
   
ASBMB-MERCK AWARD
 Cravatt 

Benjamin F. Cravatt, The Scripps Research Institute
Activity- based proteomics - applications for enzymes and inhibitor discovery
Tuesday, April 29, 2:55 pm - 3:30 pm, Convention Center, Room 6A

   
   
ASBMB PLENARY LECTURE
 Weissman 

Jonathan S. Weissman, Howard Hughes Medical Institute HHMI/University of California, San Francisco
Globally watching translation one codon at a time through ribosome profiling
Monday, April 28, 2:55 pm - 3:30 pm, Convention Center, Room 6A 

   
   
ASBMB YOUNG INVESTIGATOR AWARD
 Jaffrey 

Samie R. Jaffrey, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University
Imaging RNA and RNA biology using RNA mimics of green fluorescent protein
Tuesday, April 29, 9:05 am - 9:40 am, Convention Center, Room 6A

   
   
AVANTI AWARD IN LIPIDS
 Hofmann 

Sandra L. Hofmann, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas
Molecular basis of Infantile Batten Disease: Impact of disordered palmitoylated protein degradation on the nervous system
Wednesday, April 30, 8:30 am - 9:05 am, Convention Center, Room 6A

   
   
BERT AND NATALIE VALLEE AWARD IN BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE
 Gottesman 

Michael M. Gottesman, National Cancer Institute
Exploring the complexity of multidrug resistance in cancer
 
Sunday, April 27, 8:30 am - 9:05 am, Convention Center, Room 6A

   
   
DELANO AWARD FOR COMPUTATIONAL BIOSCIENCES
 Levitt 

Michael Levitt, Stanford University School of Medicine
Solving large and difficult structures with less experimental data
Tuesday, April 29, 8:30 am - 9:05 am, Convention Center, Room 6A

   
   
EARL AND THRESSA STADTMAN SCHOLAR AWARD
 Regev 

Aviv Regev, Broad Institute
Reconstructing regulatory circuits: Lessons from immune cells
Sunday, April 27, 9:05 am - 9:40 am, Convention Center, Room 6A

   
   
HERBERT A. SOBER LECTURESHIP
 Carroll 

Dana Carroll, University of Utah School of Medicine 
Genome engineering with targetable nucleases  
Wednesday, April 30, 9:05 am - 9:40 am, Convention Center, Room 6A

   
   
MILDRED COHN AWARD IN BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY
 Gierasch 

Lila M. Gierasch, University of Massachusetts Amherst
Towards enhanced understanding of protein folding in the cell
 
Monday, April 28, 8:30 am - 9:05 am, Convention Center, Room 6A

   
   
RUTH KIRSCHSTEIN DIVERSITY IN SCIENCE AWARD
 Kraft 

Freeman A. Hrabowski, III, University of Maryland, Baltimore County 

 Kraft 

Michael F. Summers, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Preparing Minority Scientists and Engineers
Monday, April 28, 9:05 am - 9:40 am, Convention Center, Room 6A  

   
   
WALTER A. SHAW YOUNG INVESTIGATOR AWARD IN LIPID RESEARCH
 Maquat 

Mary L. Kraft, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
The unexpected sphingolipid and cholesterol distribution in the plasma membrane
 
Sunday, April 27, 3:45 pm, within the symposium, "Membrane Interfaces: A New Frontier," Convention Center, Room 6C

   
   
WILLIAM C. ROSE AWARD
 Maquat 

Lynne E. Maquat, University of Rochester Medical Center
"Alu"strious Effects on Human RNA Metabolism: Post-transcriptional Gene Regulation by Intermolecular and Intramolecular Alu Element Base-pairing
Sunday, April 27, 2:55 pm - 3:30 pm, Convention Center, Room 6A

   
   
Public Policy and Science Outreach

EB2014 Program Search Tool/Online Itinerary Builder/View Presentation Abstracts Now Available

Click here to view the ASBMB program at-a-glance.

 

SCIENCE OUTREACH POSTERS


Sponsored by the ASBMB Public Outreach Committee
San Diego Marriott Marquis (located next door to the Convention Center) Marriott Hall 3, North Tower
SAT. APR 26, 7:30 PM-9:00 PM (During the ASBMB Opening Reception)

A special outreach-themed poster session is scheduled during the ASBMB Opening Reception. Come for the refreshments, stick around to get insights from experienced outreachers about their unique programs. Have your own informal science education program that you want to showcase? Submit your outreach program abstract today to ASBMB topic category #213 by the February 21 late-breaking abstract deadline!

BUILDING A SUSTAINABLE RESEARCH ENTERPRISE
sponsored by the ASBMB Public Affairs Advisory Committee
San Diego Convention Center, Rm 6B (Upper Level)
SUN. APR 27 12:30 PM-2:00 PM, Learn more 

Moderator: Jeremy M. Berg, Univ of Pittsburgh
Michael Marletta, Scripps Res Inst
Lita Nelson, MIT
Lana Skirboll, Sanofi
Paula Stephan, Georgia State Univ

CAREERS IN SCIENCE POLICY
Issues-based session sponsored by the ASBMB Minority Affairs Committee
San Diego Convention Center, Rm 1A 
SUN. APR 27, 3:45 pm - 6:00 pm

Ben Corb, ASBMB
Jonathan M Gitlin, NHGRI, NIH
Cynthia Robinson, AAAS 

SCIENCE COMMUNICATION TRAINING WORKSHOP- “You Can’t Say That on Television (or to Congress, or to students)"
Sponsored by the ASBMB Public Outreach Committee
San Diego Convention Center, Room 14A, Mezzanine Level
MON. APR 28, 12:30 PM – 2:30 PM
Advance event registration required.  Learn more

Science outreach relies on the ability to properly communicate to an audience, whether giving a public presentation, responding to questions from an intrepid reporter, or showing a laboratory demonstration to K-12 students. To help ASBMB members improve their communication skills, the Public Outreach Committee is hosting a workshop that will provide session participants the opportunity to work with experts from different fields to craft targeted descriptions of their research that will serve to inform individual constituencies.

ASBMB SCIENCE CAFE "Game Changer: How a Computer Game Can Turn You Into a Real-Life Hero"
Southpaw Social Club, 815 J Street, San Diego CA
MON. APR 28, 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
Curious about how science outreach actually gets done? Then come check out our annual science cafe, sponsored by the ASBMB Public Outreach Committee. This year's cafe will feature an interactive, hands-on demo and discussion of FoldIt, the revolutionary protein folding video game being played by scientists and non-scientists alike. Learn more

 

 

21st Century Approaches to Teaching and Communicating BMB

This theme is sponsored by the ASBMB Education and Professional Development Committee (EPD)

EB2014 Program Search Tool/Online Itinerary Builder/View Presentation Abstracts Now Available

Click here to view the ASBMB program at-a-glance.

THEME ORGANIZERS
Marilee Benore, Univ of Michigan, Dearborn and
Frederick M. Hughson, Princeton Univ

 

22.     Fostering Partnerships between Colleges, Universities and K-12 Schools

Workshop

(Supported by an educational grant from National Science Foundation)

(Cosponsored by: ASBMB Minority Affairs, Education and Professional Development and Undergraduate Affiliate Network Committees)

Sat. 9:00 am—Marriott Marquis Hotel & Marina, Santa Rosa

Cochaired: R. Stevens-Truss, P. Kennelly and W. Zhao

Advance event registration required.

Workshop will promote collaborative partnerships between junior high and high school teachers and college/university faculty and researchers to bring creative, cutting-edge and hands-on science into K-12 classrooms.

 

93.     Measuring Success in Undergraduate Education

Symposium

Sun. 9:55 am—San Diego Convention Center, Room 14B

Chaired: F. M. Hughson

9:55                        Chair’s introduction.

10:00    93.1          One institution’s approach: how the University of Texas at Austin merges research and teaching through the Freshman Research Initiative S.L. Simmons. Univ. of Texas at Austin.

10:25                      Small World Initiative: crowdsourcing research of new antibiotics to enhance undergraduate biology teaching A.M. Barral, H. Makhluf, P. Soneral and B.J. Gasper. Natl. Univ., Bethel Univ. and Florida Southern Col. (618.41)

10:40                      Evolution of an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course J.T. Hazzard, N. Kenjic, M.T. Nelp, K.L. Polzin and A.P. Young. Univ. of Arizona. (618.15)

11:05                      Increased retention from a summer-bridge program focused on academics, community, and leadership S.M. Lo, L.C. Flores, D.L. Drane, S.L. Swarat, G.J. Beitel and G.J. Light. Northwestern Univ. (618.34)

11:20                      Searching for filarial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases — a bioinformatics project for high school students S. Erickson, K. Wilhelm and J. Chihade. Carleton Col., MN. (618.11)

11:35    93.2          Rethinking freshman chemistry C. Drennan, A. Olivier-Mason, E.V. Taylor and R. Mitchell. MIT.

12:00                      Discussion.

 

100.   ASBMB Award for Exemplary Contributions to Education

Award

Sun. 12:30 pm—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6A

Undergraduate student poster competition awards will be presenting during this lecture. 

12:30                      Award introduction and presentation.

12:50    100.1       Stimulating attitudes of inquiry H.B. White, III. Univ. of Delaware.

 

 104.   Mentoring and Networking: Preparing for the Future

Symposium

Sun. 3:45 pm—San Diego Convention Center, Room 14B

Chaired: C. Drennan

3:50      104.1       Mentoring young scientists F. Maxfield. Weill Cornell Med. Col.

4:15                        Undergraduate research — a key to advancing interest in STEM M.A. Carroll, D. Skeete and E.J. Catapane. Medgar Evers Col., NY. (618.40)

4:30      104.2       Bridges and barriers: understanding the educational pathways of underrepresented minority students in STEM K. Eagan. UCLA.

4:55                        Genomics Education Partnership: a research-based approach to undergraduate teaching utilizing a centralized support system A.L. Goodman, C.J. Arrigo, A.M. Barral, K.L. Jones, C.N. Peterson, J.A. Roecklein-Canfield, W. Leung, C.D. Shaffer, D. Lopatto and S.C. Elgin. California Polytech State Univ., San Luis Obispo, New Jersey City Univ., National Univ., Huntingdon Col., AL, Suffolk Univ., MA, Simmons Col., Washington Univ. in St. Louis and Grinnell Col., IA. (618.39)

5:10      “Building Your Science Toolkit”: a unique laboratory-based mentoring program aimed at undergraduate students at risk for exiting the science pipeline J. Roecklein-Canfield, E. Yasi, I. Bixho and S. Walker. Simmons Col. (618.33)

5:25      104.3       The Undergraduate Affiliates Network as a faculty network M.A. Benore. Univ. of Michigan, Dearborn.

5:50                        Discussion.

 

221.   Online Education and the Rise of the MOOC

Symposium

Mon. 9:55 am—San Diego Convention Center, Room 14B

Chaired: F. Maxfield

9:55                        Chair’s introduction.

10:00    221.1       eLearning Tech: What's on the Horizon? RB. Murray. Univ of the Sciences, Philadelphia, PA.

10:25                      Molecular and cellular biology adaptive virtual learning environment K.E. Sawarynski, D.M. Thomas, B.P. Collins and P. Weebadde. Oakland Univ. William Beaumont Sch. of Med. and Venturit Inc., East Lansing. (618.32)

10:40    221.2       Drugs and the brain, the MOOC H.A. Lester and B.N. Cohen. Caltech.

11:05                      On-line lectures: a strategy to liberate class time for active learning G.W. Muth. St. Olaf Col., MN. (618.25)

11:20                      Digital exhaust: an analysis of students’ interactions with online learning tools D. Mueller, E. Offerdahl and J. Boyer. North Dakota State Univ. (618.42)

11:35    221.3       MOOCs for hard to find AP courses M. Klawe. Harvey Mudd Col.

11:50                      Discussion.

 

233.   Career Choices: Roads Less Traveled

Symposium

Mon. 3:45 pm—San Diego Convention Center, Room 14A

Chaired: M. Benore

This session will feature a panel discussion followed by an opportunity for questions with the speakers.

3:45                        Chair’s introduction.

3:50      233.1       Preparing for your career: lessons from my own professional journey C. Fuhrmann. Univ. of Massachusetts Med. Sch.

4:10                        Animating molecular processes J. Iwasa. Univ. of Utah. (618.2)

4:25      233.2       I write so you don’t have to D. Gordon. GordonSquared, Inc.

4:45      233.3       A biochemist’s journey to bioanalytical and traditional analytical chemistry J. Rohrer. Thermo Fisher Scientific.

5:00      233.4       Science and law: emerging challenges L.B. Andrews. IIT Chicago-Kent Col. of Law.

5:20                        Discussion.

 

348.   Promoting Concept-Driven Teaching Strategies in BMB through Concept Assessments

Symposium

Tue. 9:55 am—San Diego Convention Center, Room 14B

Chaired: K. Fox

9:55                        Chair’s introduction.

10:00    348.1       Growth of a community: ASBMB project to create resources to support the biochemistry and molecular biology community and education J. Provost. Univeristy of San Diego.

10:25    348.2       Translating DBERese M. Osgood. University of New Mexico.

10:50    348.3       Curriculum alignment: gateway to capstone D. Sears and C. Bailey. UCSB and HHMI.

11:15    348.4       Assessing student skills in laboratory and research experiences B.D. Caldwell. Missouri Western State Univ.

11:40    348.5       Aligning and using assessments in gateway courses for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology majors E. Bell. Univ. of Richmond.

12:05                      Discussion.

  

 

Graduate and Postdoctoral Events

Graduate and Postdoctoral Events

TRAVEL AWARD POSTER SESSION AND ACTIVE NETWORKING EVENT
Friday, April 25, 5:15 pm - 7:30 pm (Check in, 4:30 pm - 5:15 pm)
San Diego Convention Center, 6A

Friday evening's events are required attendance events, exclusively for recipients of the ASBMB Graduate Minority and Graduate/Postdoctoral Travel Awards. All others are welcome to register for Saturday's Professional Development Program for Trainees (see below).

TRAVEL AWARD ACTIVE NETWORKING EVENT

On Friday, travel awardees will be arriving in San Diego from all over the world.  Tired from a long day of travel, or charged with nerves, we'll energize the crowd and burn off any nervous energy with a fun, fast-paced, networking activity.  From the very start of the meeting, we'll get everyone meeting, talking, and networking.  Join us with an open mind and a positive attitude.  Door prizes will be drawn and refreshments served.  

Event is invitation only for our travel award recipients. 

POSTER SESSION, PART I

Following the opening networking event, Graduate Minority and Graduate/Postdoctoral Travel Awardees will present their research to fellow recipients and continue networking with peers. Poster Session, Part II is hosted on Saturday.  Travel award recipients are required to attend both sessions. 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM FOR TRAINEES
Saturday, April 26, 9:00 am – 4:30 pm, (Check in 8:30 am - 8:50 am outside Room 6A)
San Diego Convention Center
Event registration for this program is fully subscribed. (*)

CAREER OPTIONS: THE BENCH, THE BOARDROOM OR IN BETWEEN?
9:00 am - 12:15 pm, Room 6D

Careers in industry, science journalism, regulatory affairs, and more are presented in the morning’s program.  Each speaker will briefly share his/her story to finding a fulfilling career that may be of interest to you or that you may not have considered before.  Helpful suggestions will be offered for those interested in pursuing a similar career.  An open Q&A session with the panel will follow so you can ask specific questions.  Presenters join attendees for lunch and continued discussion.

Presenters:

Academic Medical Center
Joanna Groden, The Ohio State University College of Medicine

Creating a Career in Regulatory Affairs
J
enny Grodberg, Trius Therapeutics Inc

From Britain to the Bay Area - My Adventures in Biotech
Jennie Lill, Genentech

Life at a Predominately Undergraduate Institution: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
Mitchell Malachowski, University of San Diego

In and Out of Academic Science, A Career in Technical Sales and Business Development
Joe Soughayer, IonOptix Scientific Instruments

Options Beyond Academia in Scientific Editing
Laura M. Zahn, Senior Editor, SCIENCE

NETWORKING LUNCHEON
12:15 pm - 1:30 pm

Invited presenters will join trainees for continued discussion of career interests and issues over lunch.

POSTER SESSION, PART II
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm

All are welcome at the afternoon poster session featuring Graduate and Postdoctoral Travel Awardee presentations.  Part I hosted on Friday.  Awardees are required to attend both sessions. 

CAREER DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOPS
2:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Concurrent afternoon workshops allow you to pick the session that best targets your career stage, goals and interests or feel free to move between workshops to take away helpful information from all three discussions.  These workshops are question and answer discussions between the attendees and panelists.  You will also have an opportunity to submit questions in advance of the meeting.

I. Pathway(s) to Your Own Lab: A Workshop for Postdoctoral Fellows

A no-holds barred question and answer session on becoming a PI of your own lab.  There is no single right answer to how this is done, but through shared experiences of the panel and audience members already starting the process, participants at any stage of their postdoc should find helpful hints to achieving success in academia.

Organizer: Christopher D. Heinen, U. of Connecticut Health Center
Joanna Groden, The Ohio State University College of Medicine
Mitchell Malachowski, University of San Diego

II. Taking the Industrial Route - Tips for Careers in Science Industry

Panel discussion for graduate students and postdocs who are potentially interested in a career in industry.  This session is an opportunity to ask questions of those already in the field.  Find out if a career in industry may be right for you and what steps you can take now to prepare.

Jennie Lill, Genentech
Jenny Grodberg, Trius Therapeutics Inc

III. Advice for Surviving Graduate School: A Workshop for Graduate Students

This session will help students navigate graduate school by providing information and advice on how to take the next step.  A panel of presenters will address topics such as grant writing and thesis preparation, interview skills, looking for a Postdoc, and mentoring advice with an open Q&A session for the participants to get answers from the professionals. 

Organizer: Kimberly Dodge-Kafka, U. of Connecticut Health Center.
Michael Kapiloff, U. of Miami
Timothy O'Connell, U. of Minnesota

(*) EVENT REGISTRATION FOR SATURDAY'S PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM FOR TRAINEES
Interested graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and advisors, must register when for this event during the Experimental Biology (EB) meeting registration process.  No onsite registration.  Registration closes when fully subscribed.  
Participation is mandatory for ASBMB Travel Award recipients (travel awardees do not need to register for this event, but must register for Experimental Biology). 

$25 for ASBMB members, includes lunch
$35 for all other EB registrants, includes lunch 

 



Undergraduate Events

Start Trek: The Next Generation of Scientists
The ASBMB Annual Meeting can be a fun, educational and thrilling experience for
undergraduates.  There will be hundreds of scientific talks, free networking events, and plenary lectures delivered by well-established scientists in their fields.  You might run even into the author of your favorite biochemistry textbook or a Nobel Laureate!  The ASBMB has put together the following series of activities to help students get more out of the meeting.  

Beam Me Up Scotty!  A Galactic Overview of the Annual Meeting
San Diego Convention Center, Room 1B
SAT. APR 26, 11:30 AM

The ASBMB Undergraduate Affiliate Network Committee will be hosting an orientation for all undergraduates attending the meeting.  The event will highlight the most exciting scientific talks, networking events and must attend workshops during the meeting.     


ASBMB 18th Annual Undergraduate Student Research Poster Competition
The Vulcan Mind Probe
San Diego Convention Center, Room 6B
SAT. APR 26, 12:00 - 4:30 PM
Advance event registration required.

This is an annual event where undergraduates are invited to present their research to fellow students and scientist judges for a chance to win commendations and cash prizes.  All undergraduate abstract first authors who submit their abstracts by the November 8 deadline will be invited to participate.  Look for our e-mail invitations in January, 2014. Learn more about the 2014 Undergraduate Poster Competition. 


Exploring Careers after College Workshop
Boldly Go Where No Scientist Has Gone Before
San Diego Convention Center, Room 6A
SAT. APR 26, 4:45 - 5:45 PM

What are the career opportunities available to biomedical scientists?  Do you need a Ph.D. to embark on your dream career?  With graduation on the horizon, this is your chance to ask scientists who are pursuing both traditional and non-traditional scientific career paths.  Meet a biochemist patent lawyer, a science policy analyst, a science writer, and others who will give you tips on how to jump start your career at this Careers Speed-Dating Event.  


An Undergraduate Scavenger Hunt
Trekking for Tribbles

What are Tribbles?  That’s one of the questions you’ll have to answer in order to complete our inaugural ASBMB undergraduate student Scavenger Hunt.  More information will be made available during the orientation session.  First 25 winners can claim their prize at the ASBMB booth.   

 

 

 

Workshops

EB2014 Program Search Tool/Online Itinerary Builder/View Presentation Abstracts Now Available

Click here to view the ASBMB program at-a-glance.

FOSTERING PARTNERSHIPS AMONG COLLEGES, UNIVERSITIES AND K-12 SCHOOLS
San Diego Marriott Marquis Hotel, Santa Rosa Room, South Tower (Facing the Lobby Starbucks, turn left, go down the escalator and turn right.  Santa Rosa is on your right.)
SAT. APR 26, 9:00 am-1:00 pm

Advance workshop registration required.  For more information, visit www.asbmb.org/hopes2014. This workshop is designed for junior high and high school teachers and college/university faculty and researchers who are interested in forming collaborative partnerships to bring creative, cutting-edge, and hands-on science into K-12 classrooms.

QUANTITATIVE IMAGING OF CELLULAR LIPIDS WORKSHOP
sponsored by an educational grant from Avanti Polar Lipids
San Diego Convention Center, Room 1B
MON, APR 28, 12:30 - 2:00 pm

Presenters: C. Stefan, M. Kraft, and G. Hammond
Lipids are essential components of biological membranes, and it remains a challenge to visualize lipids in their cellular context. This workshop will highlight new approaches for the quantitative detection and imaging of cellular lipids. The program will feature expert presentations and interactive discussion aimed at developing new ideas and strategies for the quantitative imaging of cellular lipids.

MOLECULAR FLIPBOOK: A NEW SOFTWARE FOR CREATING AND SHARING MOLECULAR ANIMATIONS
San Diego Convention Center, Room 28E
Tuesday, April 29, 12:30 - 1:30 pm

Presenter: J. Iwasa, Univ of Utah
Have you been hoping to create a dynamic visualization to better explain your research?  Learn how to create and share your own molecular animations using Molecular Flipbook, an intuitive and free/open-source molecular animation software created by and for biology researchers.

COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL TOOLS FROM THE ENZYME FUNCTION INITIATIVE FOR DISCOVERING FUNCTION OF UNKNOWN ENZYMES
San Diego Convention Center, Room 14A, Mezzanine Level
Tuesday, April 29, 12:30 - 2:30 pm 
Supported by an education grant from Enzyme Function Initiative, NIH/NIGMS grant U54 GM093342 

The Enzyme Function Initiative (EFI; enzymefunction.org) is devising an integrated sequence/structure based strategy for predicting and assigning functions to “unknown” enzymes discovered in genome projects, a major challenge in genomic biology.  To accomplish this goal, the EFI has brought together multidisciplinary expertise in bioinformatics, experimental structural biology, structural modeling/docking, and experimental enzymology to assign in vitro substrate specificities and enzymatic functions and, also, microbiology and metabolomics to validate predicted and experimentally confirmed in vitro enzymatic functions in an in vivo context.

A major focus of the EFI is dissemination of its tools and strategies to the broader scientific community.  This workshop will feature presentations describing the development and application of high throughput computational, bioinformatic, and experimental tools to facilitate functional assignment of unknown enzymes discovered in genome sequencing projects.

Brian Shoichet, Univ. of Toronto
Docking and Docking Tools for Enzyme Substrate Prediction

A key problem in the post-genomic era is assigning functions to the proteins whose sequences, and sometimes structures, we now know.  The problem is acute for enzymes; as for most organisms less than half the enzymes have reliable functions assigned to them.  An approach to this problem is to dock the known metabolites against an enzyme structure derived either from experiment or, increasingly, modeling.  For all of its ambiguities and problems, several different docking methods have had remarkable success in predicting new substrates across several enzyme super-families.  Recent progress in this area will be discussed, as will community access tools for prosecuting this research.

John A. Gerlt, Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
EFI-EST:  A Web-Server for Generating Sequence Similarity Networks

Sequence similarity networks have been developed by the EFI to explore sequence-function space in protein (super)families. The networks can be used to develop approaches for discovering the functions of unknown enzymes discovered in genome projects. EFI-EST, a web-server, will be demonstrated; it is available to the community to generate sequence similarity networks for their "favorite" enzyme families.

Steven Almo, Albert Einstein Col. of Med.
HTP Protein Production and Structure Determination

We describe our pipeline for high-throughput protein expression, purification, crystallization and structure determination. This pipeline leverages extensive automation for the large-scale production of materials in both bacterial and eukaryotic hosts. These materials support extensive ligand discovery efforts and underscore the contributions of "untargeted" structure determination for metabolite and pathway discovery.

 

 

 

 

 

Special Events

EB2014 Program Search Tool/Online Itinerary Builder/View Presentation Abstracts Now Available

Click here to view the ASBMB program at-a-glance.

FOSTERING PARTNERSHIPS AMONG COLLEGES, UNIVERSITIES AND K-12 SCHOOLS

San Diego Marriott Marquis Hotel
SAT. APR 26, 9:00 AM-1:00 PM

Advance workshop registration required.  For more information, visit www.asbmb.org/hopes2014. This workshop is designed for junior high and high school teachers and college/university faculty and researchers who are interested in forming collaborative partnerships to bring creative, cutting-edge, and hands-on science into K-12 classrooms.

 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM FOR TRAINEES
San Diego Convention Center
SAT. APR 26, 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Advance event registration required (*)

Energize your career objectives with insider perspectives on career options, panel discussions that respond to your burning questions, and networking opportunities that will benefit you at the meeting and in the future.  Join us for this pre-meeting program that is sure to help you make the most of your "big" meeting experience.  
 Learn more 

* Advance event registration required and will be accepted when registering for Experimental Biology.   Registration includes lunch: $25 ASBMB Members, $35 all other EB registrants.  Event registration will close when fully subscribed. 
Event registration is included with the ASBMB Graduate/Postdoc and Graduate Minority Travel Awards, so event registration is not required for awardees.  However, travel award recipients must register for Experimental Biology.

 

OPENING RECEPTION & SCIENCE OUTREACH POSTERS
San Diego Marriott Marquis Hotel, North Tower, Marriott Hall 3
SAT. APR 26, 7:30 PM-9:00 PM (immediately following the Opening Lecture)

Kick start your meeting experience enjoying refreshments while connecting with friends and fellow attendees at the ASBMB Opening Reception.  Science Outreach Activity posters will be on display during the reception.  After the reception, explore San Diego's night life in the Gas Lamp District, Embarcadero/Seaport Village, Old Town and more.  ASBMB members and biochemistry nonmember attendees and guests welcome at the Opening Lecture and Reception.

 
ASBMB TWITTER BREAKFAST
San Diego Convention Center, Room 14A (Mezzanine Level)
SUN. APR 27, 7:00 AM - 8:15 AM

Start your meeting experience right by joining ASBMB staff on Sunday morning to learn about Twitter tips and tricks to use during the annual meeting and beyond. We welcome a group of diverse professionals from a variety of areas including academic institutions, nonprofit organizations, private corporations, media, etc. Attendees will leave the breakfast, well-informed, well-equipped, and well-caffeinated. 

 

 BUILDING A SUSTAINABLE RESEARCH ENTERPRISE 

sponsored by the ASBMB Public Affairs Advisory Committee
San Diego Convention Center, Rm 6B (Upper Level)
SUN. APR 27 12:30 PM-2:00 PM, Learn more

Moderator: Jeremy M. Berg, Univ of Pittsburgh
Michael Marletta, Scripps Res Inst
Lita Nelson, MIT
Lana Skirboll, Sanofi
Paula Stephan, Georgia State Univ

 

ASBMB WELCOME AND NETWORKING RECEPTION
sponsored by the ASBMB Minority Affairs Committee
San Diego Marriott Marquis Hotel (next to convention center)
Marina Ballroom D, South Tower
SUN. APR 27, 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm

The ASBMB Minority Affairs Committee welcomes primary investigators, industry professionals, educators, young scientists and students to enjoy this networking and mentoring reception.   ASBMB members and biochemistry nonmembers welcome.  Reception features posters from this year's ASBMB Graduate Minority Travel Award recipients. 

 

CELEBRATE WITH THE JBC
San Diego Convention Center, Room 6B
MON, APR 28, 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm, immediately following the afternoon sessions 

Find your home at the JBC. Explore the launch of our 23 Affinity Groups, network with the Associate Editors, and enjoy refreshments. We will thank our authors and want to meet our future authors while celebrating the journal. ASBMB members and biochemistry registrants welcome.

 

Y.E.S. MIXER (YOUNG EXPERIMENTAL SCIENTISTS)
San Diego location tba
MON. APR 28, time tba

The Y.E.S. Mixer brings together trainees and students from all Experimental Biology disciplines for a fun, club-like, dance party. Meeting registration badge must be worn to gain admittance. Beverage tickets issued at the door, while supplies last. Alcohol will Not be served to those under 21 or those without proper ID.

 

WOMEN SCIENTISTS NETWORKING EVENT
San Diego Convention Center, Rm 14A (Mezzanine Level)
TUES. APR 29, 6:00 - 8:00 pm

Each year, the ASBMB sponsors a session where women scientists reflect on some aspect of their careers or general issues surrounding women’s participation in science. This year, leaders from academics and industry will discuss their career paths and facilitate discussions on how women can better promote themselves and support one another in reaching their goals.

 

 

START TREK THE NEXT GENERATION OF UNDERGRADUATE ANNUAL MEETING EVENTS 
San Diego locations and times tba
 Learn more

Beam Me Up Scotty!  A Galactic Overview/Orientation of the ASBMB Annual Meeting (SAT.)

Boldly Go Where No Scientist Has Gone Before!  Exploring Careers after College (SAT.)

Vulcan Mind Probe!  ASBMB 18th Annual Undergraduate Student Research Poster Competition (SAT. Advance event registration required). 

Trekking for Tribbles, An Undergraduate Scavenger Hunt

 

 

 


SCIENTIFIC SESSIONS

DNA Replication, Recombination and Repair

  

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THEME ORGANIZERS
M. Todd Washington, Univ of Iowa, Carver Col of Med and
Virginia Zakian, Princeton Univ

97.     Replication and Protection of DNA Ends

Symposium

Sun. 9:55 am—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6D

Chaired: V. A. Zakian

9:55                        Chair’s introduction.

10:00    97.1          Evolution of telomeres and telomerase: new partners spice up the dance D. Shippen. Texas A&M Univ.

10:25                      The architecture of Tetrahymena telomerase J. Feigon. UCLA. (926.2)

10:40    97.2          Non-telomerase telomere maintenance in human cells R. Reddel, D. Conomos, J. Henson, C. Napier, A. Neumann and H. Pickett. Children’s Med. Res. Inst., Univ. of Sydney.

11:05                      The Cdc13-Stn1-Ten1 complex stimulates Pol α activity by promoting the primase-to-polymerase switch N. Lue. Weill Cornell Med. Col. (548.2)

11:20                      Position-dependent instability of ribosomal DNA repeats A. Hochwagen, D. Wang and A. Mansisidor. NYU. (736.1)

11:35    97.3          Role of the breast cancer suppressor BRCA1 in the maintenance of genomic integrity M. Jasin, E.M. Kass, Y. Zhang, P. Sung and C-C. Chen. Mem. Sloan-Kettering Cancer Ctr.

12:00                      Discussion

 

236.   Coping with Barriers to DNA Replication

Symposium

Mon. 3:45 pm—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6D

Chaired: S. H. Wilson

3:45                        Chair’s introduction.

3:50      236.1       The fission yeast Pfh1 DNA helicase promotes fork progression through multiple types of replication obstacles V.A. Zakian, N. Sabouri, T. Capra, K. McDonald, I. Cristea and M. Bochman. Princeton Univ, Umea University, Vanderbilt University and Indiana University.

4:20                        Three distinct pathways for double-strand break formation at palindromic repeats in yeast Z. Sheng, N. Saini, J. Haber and K. Lobachev. Georgia Tech and Brandeis Univ. (735.10)

4:35          An asymmetric gene evolution mechanism via replication-transcription conflicts H. Merrikh, S. Million-Weaver and A. Nakta Samadpour. Univ. of Washington. (735.11)

5:00                        Novel ubiquitin binding sites of S. cerevisiae polymerase η identified by a genetically encoded photoactive probe M. Urban, K. Yang and Z. Zhuang. Univ. of Delaware. (927.4)

5:15      236.3       Translesion DNA synthesis: structure and specificity A. Aggarwal. Mount Sinai Sch. of Med.

5:45                        Discussion

 

352.   Architecture and Dynamics of Replication, Repair, and Recombination Complexes

Symposium

Tue. 9:55 am—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6D

Chaired: D. Shippen

9:55                        Chair’s introduction.

10:00    352.1       Repair pathway crosstalk in genome stability maintenance through BRCA1/2-mediated homologous recombination P.K. Cooper, K.S. Trego, T. Groesser, A.C. Parplys, J. Cmielova, C. Wiese, P. Sung and J. Campisi. Lawrence Berkeley Natl. Lab., Yale Univ. and Buck Inst. for Res. on Aging.

10:25                      The Mus81-Mms4 structure-selective endonuclease undergoes nicked junction-induced conformational changes to bend its DNA substrates for cleavage S. Mukherjee, W.D. Wright, K.T. Ehmsen and W-D. Heyer. Univ. of California, Davis. (553.1)

10:40    352.2       Structural mechanisms of DNA replication restart J.L. Keck. Univ. of Wisconsin Sch. of Med. and Publ.Hlth.

11:05                      Hrq1, a homolog of the human RecQ4 helicase, acts catalytically and structurally to promote genome integrity M.L. Bochman, K.E. van Kessel and K. Paeschke. Indiana Univ. and Univ. of Wurzburg. (924.1)

11:20                      The E. coli single stranded DNA binding protein SSB interacts with the UmuD polymerase manager protein M. Naniong, M.C. Silva, A. DiBenedetto, C. Dang, C. Alves, M. Chang and P.J. Beuning. Northeastern Univ. (735.7)

11:35    352.3       Architecture and dynamics of protein complexes containing proliferating cell nuclear antigen M.T. Washington. Univ. of Iowa, Carver Col. of Med.

12:00                      Discussion

 

477.   Post-translational Modification in Replication, Repair, and Recombination

Symposium

Wed. 1:45 pm—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6D

Chaired: M. Washington

1:45                        Chair’s introduction.

1:50      477.1       Single molecule sorting of the DNA repair machines M. Spies. Univ. of Iowa, Carver Col. of Med.

2:15                        Nucleosome acidic patch promotes H2AX and H2A ubiquitination and DNA damage signaling K. Miller. Univ. of Texas at Austin. (925.1)

2:30      477.2       Understanding base lesion DNA repair S.H. Wilson. NIEHS, NIH.

2:55                        Phosphorylation of the Sae2 endonuclease promotes its solubility and activity in DNA repair T. Paull and Q. Fu. Univ. of Texas at Austin. (735.4)

3:10                        A new approach to study site-specific protein sumoylation C.P. Albuquerque, E. Yeung, S.X. Ma, T. Fu and H. Zhou. Ludwig Inst. for Cancer Res., and UCSD. (925.3)

3:25      477.3       A SUMO Atlas shoulders the DNA damage response X. Zhao, I. Chung, P. Sarangi and L. Wei. Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Ctr.

3:50                        Discussion

 

Emerging Roles of Mitochondria in Cell Signaling, Physiology and Disease

 

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THEME ORGANIZERS
Craig E. Cameron, Penn State Univ and
Heidi McBride, Montreal Neurological Inst, McGill Univ

94.     mtDNA Genetics, Replication and Expression

Symposium

Sun. 9:55 am—San Diego Convention Center, Room 1A

Chaired: G. S. Shadel

9:55                        Chair’s Introduction.

10:00    94.1          A mitochondrial etiology of metabolic and degenerative diseases, cancer and aging D.C. Wallace. Children’s Hosp. of Philadelphia and Univ. of Pennsylvania.

10:25                      Yeast cells expressing the human mitochondrial DNA polymerase reveal correlations between polymerase fidelity and human disease progression Y. Qian, A.H. Kachroo, C.M. Yellman, E.M. Marcotte and K.A. Johnson. Univ. of Texas at Austin. (573.1)

10:40    94.2          New paradigms for regulation of human mitochondrial transcription C.E. Cameron. Penn State.

11:05                      Diverse topological requirements for mitochondrial transcription N. Sondheimer and O. Zollo. Univ. of Pennsylvania. (573.5)

11:20                      Structure, function and evolution of the mitochondrial replicative DNA helicase L.S. Kaguni, J. Stiban, G.A. Farnum, S.L. Hovde and M. So. Michigan State Univ. (570.1)

11:35    94.3          Regulating mtDNA dynamics by TFAM phosphorylation and degradation C.K. Suzuki, M. Li, S. Venkatesh and T. Jayapalraja. Rutgers Univ., New Jersey Med. Sch.

12:00                      Discussion

 

234.   Mitochondrial Dynamics

Symposium

Mon. 3:45 pm—San Diego Convention Center, Room 1A

Chaired: H. McBride

3:45                        Chair’s introduction.

3:50      234.1       Mitochondrial dynamics in the heart G.W. Dorn, II. Washington Univ. Sch. of Med.

4:15                        Single organelle localisation microscopy in vascular smooth muscle reveals mitochondrial networks are multiple electrically-discontinuous elements, with larger organelle dimensions and more extensive mitochondrial clustering occurring in hypertension S. Chalmers, C. Saunter, J.M. Girkin and J.G. McCarron. Univ. of Strathclyde and Durham Univ., U.K. (757.2)

4:30      234.2       The function of PINK1 and parkin in mitochondrial quality control E.A. Fon. Montreal Neuro. Inst., McGill Univ.

4:55                        Regulation of mitochondrial fission by MiD51 O. Losón, M. Rome, J. Kaiser, S-o. Shan and D. Chan. Caltech and HHMI. (757.1)

5:10                        Identification of key components involved in mtDNA inheritance during cell division B. Camacho, C. Osman and P. Walter. San Jose State Univ. and UCSF. (965.1)

5:25      234.3       Miro1-directed mitochondrial movement protects against neurodegeneration in mice J.M. Shaw, T.T. Nguyen, S.S. Oh, D. Weaver, D. Maxfield, A. Lewandowska, J. Macfarlane, G. Saunders, T. Koshiba, E.L. Feldman and G. Hajnóczky. Univ of Utah, Univ. of Michigan, Thomas Jefferson Univ., Univ. of Utah Sch. of Med. and Kyushu Univ.

5:50                        Discussion

 

349.   Mitochondrial Function in Cell Fate

Symposium

Tue. 9:55 am—San Diego Convention Center, Room 1A

Chaired: J. Shaw

9:55                        Chair’s introduction.

10:00    349.1       Mitochondria play a central role in NLRP3 inflammasome activation N. Subramanian, K. Natarajan, M.R. Clatworthy, Z. Wang and R.N. Germain. Inst. for Systems Biology, NIAID/NIH, and Cambridge Inst. for Med. Res.

10:25                      Metalloprotease OMA1 is involved in fine-tuning of mitochondrial bioenergetic function in embryonic development O. Khalimonchuk, N. Zahayko, J.J. Rahn, M.R. Fernandez, R.E. Lewis and S.S. Chan. Univ. of Nebraska-Lincoln, Med. Univ. of South Carolina and Univ. of Nebraska Med. Ctr. (756.4)

10:40    349.2       Keeping mitochondria and ER together: a matter of life, death and neurodegeneration L. Scorrano. Univ of Padua, Italy.

11:05                      Mitochondrial proteomes of Drosophila melanogaster adapted to chronic hypoxic environment J. Xue, S. Yin, G. Perkins, M.H. Ellisman, G.G. Haddad, S. Liu and D. Zhou. UCSD, Beijing Inst. of Genomics and The Rady Children’s Hosp., San Diego. (960.7)

11:20                      Mitochondrial fission is necessary for vascular smooth muscle cell migration L. Wang and Y. Yoon. Med. Col. of Georgia. (761.1)

11:35    349.3       Mitochondrial SUMOylation as a critical regulator of proliferation and death H. McBride, R. Zunino and V. Goyon. Montreal Neurol. Inst., McGill Univ.

12:00                      Discussion.

 

474.   Mitochondrial (Dys)Function and Disease

Symposium

Wed. 1:45 pm—San Diego Convention Center, Room 1A

Chaired: C. E. Cameron

1:45                        Chair’s introduction.

1:50      474.1       The role of phosphorylation and acetylation in modulating mitochondrial metabolism D. Pagliarini. Univ of Wisconsin-Madison.

2:15                        Mitochondrial membrane lipidome defines yeast longevity V. Titorenko, A. Beach, V.R. Richard, A. Leonov, A. Piano and R. Feldman. Concordia Univ., Canada. (956.2)

2:30      474.2       Programming of mitochondrial fuel metabolism in the control of seizure responses N.N. Danial. Dana-Farber Cancer Inst, Harvard Med Sch.

2:55                        The role of bcl-2 proteins during chronic glucose exposure coupled with oxidative stress K. Van Dalfsen and V. Del Gaizo Moore. Elon Univ. (960.3)

3:10                        Mitochondrial dynamics in hepatitis B and C virus persistent viral infections S-J. Kim, G.H. Syed, M. Khan, M.A. Sohail and A. Siddiqui. UCSD. (575.9)

3:25      474.3       Mitochondrial stress signaling in disease and aging G.S. Shadel. Yale Sch. of Med.

3:50                        Discussion

 

Enzyme Mechanisms and Chemical Biology

  

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THEME ORGANIZERS
Karen S. Anderson, Yale Univ and
Kevin D. Walker, Michigan State Univ

110.   Biocatalysis and Enzyme Mechanism

Symposium

Sun. 3:45 pm—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6F

Chaired: S. Garneau-Tsodikova

3:45      Chair’s introduction.

3:50      110.1       Mechanistic studies of different thymidylate synthases and the role of protein dynamics in catalysis A. Kohen. University of Iowa.

4:15                        The role of oxyanion holes in the structure and function of type III polyketide synthases C.E. Stewart and J.P. Noel. Salk Inst. for Biol. Studies. (768.18)

4:30      110.2       Frontiers beyond the hydroxylation paradigm in the diverse chemistry of non-heme Fe(IV)-oxo (ferryl) enzyme intermediates J.M. Bollinger. Penn State.

4:55                        MauG catalysis: a tale of ferryl iron, radicals and long distance hopping C. Wilmot, E. Yukl and V. Davidson. Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis and Univ. of Central Florida. (774.8)

5:10      ACP modification to understand protein-protein interactions in fatty acid biosynthesis M.D. Burkart. UCSD. (768.6)

5:25      110.3       Application of plant and bacterial enzymes in the biocatalysis of paclitaxel K.D. Walker. Michigan State Univ.

5:50                        Discussion

 

227.   Probing Enzyme Structure and Catalysis

Symposium

Mon. 9:55 am—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6F

Chaired: K. S. Anderson

9:55                        Chair’s introduction.

10:00    227.1       Searching for conformationally-selective small molecule therapeutics using ion mobility-mass spectrometry B.T. Ruotolo. Univ. of Michigan.

10:25                      TBA.

10:40    227.2       Enzymology of H2S signaling R. Banerjee. Univ. of Michigan.

11:05                      The crystal structure of SOD5: an unusual copper-only superoxide dismutase J. Waninger-Saroni, J. Gleason, A. Galaleldeen, P.J. Hart and V.C. Culotta. St. Mary’s Univ., San Antonio, Johns Hopkins Univ. and Univ. of Texas Hlth. Sci. Ctr. at San Antonio. (774.2)

11:20                      Urzymology: experimental access to the origins of catalytic activity and translation C.W. Carter, V. Weinreb, L. Li, M. Collier, S.N. Chandrasekaran and H. Fried. Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. (967.8)

11:35    227.3       Discovery of novel enzyme activities and metabolic pathways J.A. Gerlt. Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

12:00                      Discussion

 

363.   Chemical Biology and Enzyme Evolution

Symposium

Tue. 3:45 pm—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6F

Chaired: K. D. Walker

3:45                        Chair’s introduction.

3:50      363.1       Exploring and exploiting aminoglycoside resistance enzymes S. Tsodikova. University of Kentucky.

4:15                        It takes two to tango: fine-tuning of soluble guanylate cyclase activity via protein-protein interactions and conformational changes E.D. Garcin, F. Seeger, R. Quintyn, A. Tanimoto, G.J. Williams, S.E. Tsutakawa, V. Wysocki and J.A. Tainer. Univ. of Maryland Baltimore County, The Ohio State Univ. and Lawrence Berkeley Natl. Lab.

4:30      363.2       Withdrawn.

4:55                        Biochemical and structural insight into the iterative oxidation mechanism of deoxy-5-methylcytosine on DNA by a Naegleria gruberi enzyme, 5-methylpyrimidine dioxygenase 1 L. Saleh, E. Tamanaha, K. Trottier, N. Dai and C.J. Noren. New England Biolabs. (768.16)

5:10                        The stops and starts of protein splicing: regulation and mechanism of non-canonical inteins K. Mills, J.N. Reitter, M.C. Nicastri, J.E. Williams and K.M. Colelli. Holy Cross, Worcester. (584.1)

5:25      363.3       Design of a novel redox biocatalyst to specification A.S. Bommarius, M.J. Abrahamson, M. Schuermann, S.K. Au and B.R. Bommarius. Georgia Institute of Technology and DSM Innovative Syntheses.

5:50                        Discussion

 

473.   Molecular Tools for Protein Signaling

Symposium

Wed. 9:55 am—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6F

Chaired: R. Banerjee

9:55                        Chair’s introduction.

10:00    473.1       Temporal resolution of protein signaling K.S. Anderson, C.D. Sohl, B. Luo, S. Mo, Y. Kim, M. Apetri, E. Lew, C.M. Furdui and J. Schlessinger. Yale Univ. Sch. of Med.

10:25                      A redox-centered view of radiation resistance in head and neck squamous cancer J. Mims, W. Zhao, J.A. Reisz, N. Devarie Baez, J.G. Kuremsky, E.C. Punska, K.E. Williams, K.F. Arcaro, A.W. Tsang and C.M. Furdui. Wake Forest Sch. of Med. and Univ. of Massachusetts Amherst. (768.1)

10:40    473.2       Spatially-resolved proteomic mapping of living cells via peroxidase-mediated promiscuous biotinylation A.Y. Ting. MIT.

11:05                      Designing oligonucleotide conformational states for quantitative transcription factor detection A.J. Bonham. Metropolitan State Univ. of Denver. (768.2)

11:20                      A protein crystallography and small molecule informatics-based discovery engine for the development of selective chemical probes for in vivo investigations of protein kinases V.L. Grum-Tokars, S.M. Roy, G. Minasov, W.F. Anderson and D.M. Watterson. Northwestern Univ., Chicago. (968.3)

11:35    473.3       Chemical genetics to map kinase signaling pathways K.M. Shokat. UCSF.

12:00                      Discussion

 

Frontiers in Glycobiology

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THEME ORGANIZERS
Lara Mahal, New York Univ and
Natasha Zachara, Johns Hopkins Univ Sch of Med

106.   Glycan Control Mechanisms: From Genome to Glycome

Symposium

Sun. 3:45 pm—San Diego Convention Center, Room 1B

Chaired: N. Zachara

3:45                        Chair’s introduction.

3:50      106.1       Complex genetic regulation of IgG glycosylation G. Lauc. Univ. of Zagreb.

4:15                        Congenital disorder of glycosylation caused by a mutation in SSR4, the signal sequence receptor 4 protein of the TRAP complex M-E. Losfeld, B.G. Ng, M. Kircher, K.J. Buckingham, E.H. Turner, A. Eroshkin, J.D. Smith, J. Shendure, D.A. Nickerson, M.J. Bamshad and H.H. Freeze. Sanford-Burnham Med. Res. Inst. and Univ. of Washington. (789.3)

4:30      106.2       Sweet Patterns:Decoding glycan control mechanisms using systems-based approaches. L. Mahal. NYU.

4:55                        Identification of novel relationships between glycosyltransferase genotypes and protein glycoforms in pancreatic cancer H. Tang, K. Partyka, K.A. Maupin, H. Westra, H. Zeh, Y. Huang, R. Brand and B. Haab. Van Andel Inst., Grand Rapids, Univ. of Pittsburgh Med. Ctr. and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Res. Ctr. (608.6)

5:10      Transcriptional regulation of O-GlcNAc homeostasis K. Qian, H-B. Ruan and X. Yang. Yale Univ. Sch. of Med. (607.8)

5:25      106.3       Glycans in metabolic origins of common disease J.D. Marth, K. Ohtsubo and J. Ochoa-Reparaz. Sanford-Burnham Med. Res. Inst.

5:50                        Discussion

 

223.   Glycans in the Brain and Nervous System

Symposium

Mon. 9:55 am—San Diego Convention Center, Room 1B

Chaired: R. Schnaar

9:55                        Chair’s introduction.

10:00    223.1       GDE2 downregulates Notch signaling to promote neurogenesis through GPI-anchor cleavage S. Sockanathan. Johns Hopkins Univ.

10:25                      Identification of ectonucleotide pyrophos-phatase/phosphodiesterase 3 as a new modifier of glycan biosynthesis N. Taniguchi, H. Korekane, J.Y. Park, A. Matsumoto, K. Nakajima, S. Takamatsu, K. Ohtsubo and Y. Miyamoto. RIKEN Global Res. Cluster, Wako and Osaka Med. Ctr. for Cancer and Cardiovasc. Dis. (788.3)

10:40    223.2       Roles of glycosaminoglycans in brain physiology and neurological disorders Y. Yamaguchi. Sanford-Burnham Med. Res. Inst.

11:05                      Functional characterization of the N-glycans in lysosomal alpha-mannosidase revealed a different sorting mechanism in the brain compared to peripheral organs O.K. Greiner-Tollersrud. Univ. of Tromso, Norway. (787.4)

11:20                      Uniquely human changes in expression and binding specificity of Siglec-11: implications for human brain evolution F. Schwarz, L. Deng, C. Landig, N. Varki and A. Varki. UCSD. (787.2)

11:35    223.3       Modulation of O-GlcNAc levels as a disease modifying approach for Alzheimer disease S.A. Yuzwa, X. Shan, J. Heinonen, N. Cekic, B. Jones, C-X. Gong, N. Watson and D. Vocadlo. Simon Fraser Univ. and Inst. for Basic Res. into Develop. Disabil.

12:00                      Discussion

 

359.   Glycans in Injury and Inflammation

Symposium

Tue. 3:45 pm—San Diego Convention Center, Room 1B

Chaired: J. Marth

3:45                        Chair’s introduction.

3:50      359.1       Siglec induction of B cell tolerance by recognition of sialic acids as self M.S. Macauley, F. Pfrengle, C. Rademacher and J.C. Paulson. The Scripps Res. Inst.

4:15                        Hyaluronan rafts in airway epithelial cells A. Abbadi, M. Lauer, S. Swaidani and V. Hascall. Cleveland Clin. Fndn. (1007.6)

4:30      359.2       The role of glycans in platelet birth and death K. Hoffmeister, A. Jurak Begonja and S. Giannini. Harvard Med. Sch./Brigham and Women’s Hosp.

4:55                        Role of ICAM-1 hypoglycosylation in atherosclerotic plaque formation M.O. Vallejo, D.W. Scott and R.P. Patel. Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham and Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. (1003.1)

5:10                        Inhibition of glycosphingolipid synthesis ameliorates atherosclerosis and arterial stiffness in Apo E-/- mice and rabbits fed a high fat and cholesterol diet C. Amuzie, S. Mishra, D. Bedja, A. Avolio, D. Kass, D. Berkowitz, M. Renehan and S. Chatterjee. Johns Hopkins Univ. Sch. of Med. and Macquarie Univ., Australia. (607.11)

5:25      359.3       O-GlcNAc regulated arginine methylation: a novel paradigm in survival signaling N. Zachara, K. Fahie, R. Henry, D. Miller and A. Lee. Johns Hopkins Univ. Sch. of Med.

5:50                        Discussion

 

469.   Glycans in Vaccine Development and the Immune System

Symposium

Wed. 9:55 am—San Diego Convention Center, Room 1B

Chaired: J. Paulson

9:55                        Chair’s introduction.

10:00    469.1       Synthetic glycopeptide antigens for HIV vaccine design L-X. Wang. Univ. of Maryland Sch. of Med.

10:25                      Investigating the role of protein O-fucosyltransferase 1 in Toll-like receptor signaling J. Mann, N. Li, K. Laky, I.D.C. Fraser and A. Nita-Lazar. NIAID, NIH. (1004.6)

10:40    469.2       Regulation of the immune response by carbohydrates B. Cobb. Case Western Reserve Univ. Sch. of Med.

11:05                      Human dendritic cells induce B-cell responses to polysaccharide antigens D. Mendoza, Y. Xu, M. Rodriguez-Barradas, D.J. Tweardy, F.M. Orson and D.B. Corry. Baylor Col. of Med. and VA Med. Ctr. (1004.2)

11:20                      Genetics and virulence role of the classical group A Streptococcus Lancefield antigen J. Cole, N. van Sorge, K. Kuipers, A. Henningham, R. Aziz, A. Kasirer-Friede, L. Lin, E. Berends, M. Davies, G. Dougan, F. Zhang, S. Dahesh, L. Shaw, J. Gin, M. Cunningham, J. Merriman, S. Rooijakkers, R. Malley, M. Walker, S. Shattil, P. Schlievert, B. Choudhury and V. Nizet. Univ. of Queensland, Australia, UCSD, Univ. Med. Ctr. Utrecht, The Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst., Cambridge, Boston Children’s Hosp., Univ. of Oklahoma and Univ. of Iowa. (790.2)

11:35    469.3       β-Glucan particles as a vaccine platform with intrinsic adjuvanticity S. Levitz. Univ. of Massachusetts Med. Sch.

12:00                      Discussion

 

Lipids-From Biochemistry to Physiology

 

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The Lipids theme is sponsored by an educational grant from Avanti Polar Lipids

96.     Diverse Biological Functions of Sphingolipids

Symposium

Sun. 9:55 am—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6C

Chaired: B. Ogretmen

9:55                        Chair’s introduction.

10:00    96.1          Roles of sphingolipid metabolism in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease T. Geng, A. Sutter, K. Chavin and L.A. Cowart. Med. Univ. of South Carolina.

10:25                      Phosphatidylethanolamine increases perilipin 2 binding to synthetic lipid droplets C. Rickertsen, E. Townsend, L. Listenberger and K. Kharbanda. St. Olaf Col., MN and VA Nebraska-Western Iowa Hlth. Care Syst. (606.5)

10:40    96.2          Sphingosine 1-phosphate signaling in vascular and immune systems T. Hla. Weill Cornell Med. Col., Cornell Univ.

11:05                      A novel protein family controls trafficking and metabolism of glycosphingolipids M. Jovic, Y.J. Kim, B. Toth, G. Tuymetova, A. Tsiomenko and T. Balla. NICHD and NIDDK, NIH. (606.9)

11:20                      Role of lysophosphatidic acid in traumatic brain injury: anti-LPA antibodies are neuroprotective after experimental TBI J. Wojciak, R. Sabbadini, P. Crack, C. Morganti-Kossmann, M. Zhang, A. Pebay, A. Conquest and A. Morris. Lpath Inc., San Diego, Univ. of Melbourne, Monash Univ., Florey Inst. of Neurosci. and Ment. Hlth., Monash Univ., Australia and Univ. of Kentucky. (999.3)

11:35    96.3          Nuclear sphingosine 1-phosphate and lung cancer B. Ogretmen. Med. Univ. of South Carolina.

12:00                      Discussion.

 

107.   Membrane Interfaces: A New Frontier

Symposium

(Supported by an educational grant from Avanti Polar Lipids)

Sun. 3:45 pm—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6C

Chaired: V. Unger

This session features the Walter A. Shaw Young Investigator in Lipid Research Award Lecture: M.L. Kraft.

3:45                        Chair’s introduction.

3:50      107.1       The unexpected sphingolipid and cholesterol distribution in the plasma membrane M.L. Kraft. Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

4:15      107.2       Organizing signal transduction in the postsynaptic density M.B. Kennedy. Caltech.

4:40      107.3       Mapping the molecular dynamics of clathrin-mediated endocytosis C. Merrifield. Lab. of Enzymol. and Bioch. Struct., CNRS.

5:05                        Structural basis for forming the prion-like MAVS filament on the mitochondrial membrane Q-X. Jiang, H. Xu, H. Zheng, L. Huang, X. He, X. Zhang and Z. Chen. Univ. of Texas Southwestern Med. Ctr. (599.1)

5:20      107.4       Structural basis of membrane deformation by the ESCRT-III family of proteins A. Frost, W. Sundquist, J. McCullough and M. Saunders. Univ of Utah.

5:45                        Discussion.

 

229.   Quantitative Imaging of Cellular Lipids

Workshop

Mon. 12:30 pm—San Diego Convention Center, Room 1B

Presenters:
C. Stefan, M. Kraft and G. Hammond

Lipids are essential components of biological membranes, and it remains a challenge to visualize lipids in their cellular context. This workshop will highlight new approaches for the quantitative detection and imaging of cellular lipids. The program will feature expert presentations and interactive discussion aimed at developing new ideas and strategies for the quantitative imaging of cellular lipids.

 

351.   Emerging Topics in Flippases and Membrane Asymmetry

Tue. 9:55 am—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6C

Chaired: T. R. Graham

9:55                        Chair’s introduction.

10:00    351.1       Building asymmetric membranes with P4-ATPases T.R. Graham, R.D. Baldridge, P. Xu and M. Takar. Vanderbilt Univ.

10:25                      Phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate synthesis and turnover spans multiple membrane compartments G. Hammond, M.P. Machner and T. Balla. NICHD, NIH. (999.2)

10:40    351.2       Breaking asymmetry: phospholipid scrambling by GPCRs and TMEM16 proteins A.K. Menon. Weill Cornell Med. Col.

11:05                      Differential regulatory response for the Δ9 desaturase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on fatty acid species and intracellular amount C. Schriemer, M. Willey, M. Ochs, L. Hillers and V. McDonough. Hope Col., MI. (1000.3)

11:20                      A conserved ER-membrane complex facilitates phospholipid exchange between the ER and mitochondria S. Lahiri, J.T. Chao, S. Tavassoli, A.K. Wong, B.P. Young, C.J. Loewen and W.A. Prinz. NIDDK, NIH and Univ. of British Columbia. (758.5)

11:35    351.3       Making connections: control of PI kinase signaling at ER-PM junctions A.G. Manford, S.D. Emr and C.J. Stefan. Weill Inst. for Cell & Molec Biol., Cornell Univ. and University Col. London.

12:00                      Discussion.

 

476.   Emerging Roles of Mammalian Lipid Metabolism

Symposium

Wed. 1:45 pm—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6C

Chaired: M. J. Wolfgang

1:45                        Chair’s introduction.

1:50      476.1       Regulation of neuron function and metabolism by acyl-CoA hydrolysis M.J. Wolfgang. Johns Hopkins Univ. Sch. of Med.

2:15                        Stearoyl-CoA desaturase-3 mediates the regulation of adipose and hepatic murine lipid metabolism L.M. Bond, M.S. Burhans and J.M. Ntambi. Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison. (605.1)

2:30      476.2       Modulating glycerolipid synthesis and its effects on signaling and metabolism B. Finck. Washington Univ. Sch. of Med.

2:55                        One E3 ligase targets two key control points in cholesterol synthesis A.J. Brown, L.J. Sharpe, A. Loregger, E.C. Cook, L. Phan, J. Stevenson and N. Zelcer. Univ. of New South Wales Sch. of Biotechnol. and Biomolec. Sci. and Acad. Med. Ctr., Univ. of Amsterdam. (605.5)

3:10                        Discovery of a lipid deacetylase (AADACL1) as a novel regulator of platelet activation S.P. Holly, J.W. Chang, W. Li, S. Niessen, R.M. Phillips, R. Piatt, J.L. Black, M.C. Smith, Y. Boulaftali, A.S. Weyrich, W. Bergmeier, B.F. Cravatt and L.V. Parise. Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, The Scripps Res. Inst. and Univ. of Utah. (999.4)

3:25      476.3       Mapping dysregulated lipid metabolism in disease using chemoproteomic and metabolomic platforms D.K. Nomura. Univ. of California, Berkeley.

3:50                        Discussion.


 

Membrane Biology

 

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THEME ORGANIZERS
Karen Fleming, Johns Hopkins Univ and
Vinzenz Unger, Northwestern Univ

107.   Membrane Interfaces: A New Frontier

Symposium

(Supported by an educational grant from Avanti Polar Lipids)

Sun. 3:45 pm—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6C

Chaired: V. Unger

This session features the Walter A. Shaw Young Investigator in Lipid Research Award Lecture: M.L. Kraft.

3:45                        Chair’s introduction.

3:50      107.1       The unexpected sphingolipid and cholesterol distribution in the plasma membrane M.L. Kraft. Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

4:15      107.2       Organizing signal transduction in the postsynaptic density M.B. Kennedy. Caltech.

4:40      107.3       Mapping the molecular dynamics of clathrin-mediated endocytosis C. Merrifield. Lab. of Enzymol. and Bioch. Struct., CNRS.

5:05                        Structural basis for forming the prion-like MAVS filament on the mitochondrial membrane Q-X. Jiang, H. Xu, H. Zheng, L. Huang, X. He, X. Zhang and Z. Chen. Univ. of Texas Southwestern Med. Ctr. (599.1)

5:20      107.4       Structural basis of membrane deformation by the ESCRT-III family of proteins A. Frost, W. Sundquist, J. McCullough and M. Saunders. Univ of Utah.

5:45                        Discussion.

 

224.   Membrane Protein Folding

Symposium

Mon. 9:55 am—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6C

Chaired: K. Henzler-Wildman

9:55                        Chair’s introduction.

10:00    224.1       Prefolding and quality control of OMPs in periplasmic space X.S. Zhao. Peking Univ.

10:25                      Oligomerization of Hsp70 upon insertion into lipid membranes G. Armijo, D.M. Cauvi, J. Okerblom, V. Lopez, D. Gonzales, N. Arispe and A. De Maio. UCSD and Uniformed Svcs. Univ. of Hlth. Sci. (785.2)

10:40    224.2       Structure and function of the beta-barrel assembly machine and its chaperones M.C. Sousa. Univ of Colorado at Boulder.

11:05                      In vitro reconstitution of lipid-dependent membrane protein topological switching H. Vitrac, M. Bogdanov and W. Dowhan. Univ. of Texas-Houston Med. Sch. (785.1)

11:20                      Dynamics of the general secretory system viewed in near-native conditions via atomic force microscopy G. King, R.R. Sanganna Gari, N.C. Frey, C. Mao and L.L. Randall. Univ. of Missouri-Columbia. (993.1)

11:35    224.3       Membrane protein stability as the energy sink for sorting in the periplasm K.G. Fleming. Johns Hopkins Univ.

12:00                      Discussion.

 

360.   Heavy Metals Rock

Symposium

Tue. 3:45 pm—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6C

Chaired: A. Frost

3:45                        Chair’s introduction.

3:50      360.1       Regulation of iron acquisition and storage in yeast J. Kaplan. Univ. of Utah Sch. of Med.

4:15                        ABC transporters and uptake in Haemophilus influenzae H.W. Pinkett. Northwestern Univ. (997.6)

4:35                        Structural and functional characterization of a heavy metal detoxifying ABC transporter J.Y. Lee, J.G. Yang, D. Zhitnitsky, O. Lewinson and D.C. Rees. HHMI/Caltech and Technion-Israel Inst. of Technol., Haifa. (997.2)

4:55                        Insulin signaling and copper homeostasis are functionally linked in 3T3-L1 adipocytes H. Yang, N. Dhawan, K. Ivy, J.H. Kaplan and S. Lutsenko. Johns Hopkins Univ. and Univ. of Illinois at Chicago. (992.2)

5:15      360.3       In the shadows of the membrane: A tale about how to beat the odds in cellular copper acquisition V. Unger, C.R. Pope, A.G. Flores and C.J. DeFeo. Northwestern Univ. and USDA.

5:40                        Discussion.

 

470.   Movin’ in the Membrane: Membrane Protein Dynamics

Symposium

Wed. 9:55 am—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6C

Chaired: K. G. Fleming

9:55                        Chair’s introduction.

10:00    470.1       Structural basis of transmembrane voltage sensing Q. Li, S. Wanderling and E. Perozo. Univ. of Chicago.

10:25                      Identification of trafficking motifs in the C-terminus of the cystine/gluatamate exchanger, System xc- N. Ladd, E. Unterbrink, A. Georges, S. Lang and L. Chase. Hope Col., MI. (997.3)

10:40    470.2       Probing the structure and topology of caveolin-1 K.J. Glover. Lehigh Univ.

11:05                      Single molecule analysis reveals self assembly and nanoscale segregation of two distinct cavin subcomplexes on caveolae Y. Gambin, E. Sierecki, M. Polinkovsky, K. Alexandrov and R. Parton. Univ. of Queensland, Australia. (602.1)

11:20                      Investigating the domain motions of an asymmetric ABC transporter P. Tieleman, V. Corradi, G. Singh and M. Seeger. Univ. of Calgary, Canada and Univ. of Zurich. (997.1)

11:35    470.3       Conformational exchange in the mechanism of multidrug efflux by EmrE K. Henzler-Wildman. Washington Univ. Sch. of Med.

12:00                      Discussion.

 

Omics, Systems Biology and Their Translational Applications

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THEME ORGANIZERS
Ralph Bradshaw, UCSF and
Michael Snyder, Stanford Univ

95.     Systems Biology

Symposium

Sun. 9:55 am—San Diego Convention Center, Room 1B

Chaired: L. Shapiro

9:55                        Chair’s introduction.

10:00    95.1          Systems architecture of a bacterial cell cycle L. Shapiro. Stanford Univ. Sch. of Med.

10:25                      The calcineurin signaling network evolves via conserved kinase-phosphatase modules that transcend substrate identity M.S. Cyert, A. Goldman, J. Roy, B. Bodenmiller, S. Wanka, C. Landry and R. Aebersold. Stanford Univ., Inst. of Molec. Life Sci., Zurich, Univ. of Laval and ETH, Zurich. (586.3)

10:40    95.2          Hereditary kidney cancer models for understanding the cancer genome P. Spellman. Oregon Hlth. & Sci. Univ.

11:05                      Mapping the dynamic Interactomes of “druggable” membrane proteins: roles in human health and disease I. Stagljar. Univ. of Toronto. (1095.20)

11:20                      Quantitative shotgun proteomics reveals early markers of colorectal carcinogenesis A.C. Uzozie, P. Nanni, T. Staiano, J. Grossmann, S. Barkow-Oesterreicher, J.W. Shay, A. Tiwari, F. Buffoli, E. Laczko and G. Marra. Univ. of Zurich, Swiss Fed. Inst. of Technol., Zurich, Hosp. of Cremona, Italy and Univ. of Texas Southwestern Med. Ctr. (591.1)

11:35    95.3          Genetic variability and the quantitative proteome R. Aebersold. ETH Zurich and Univ. of Zurich.

12:00                      Discussion.

 

235.   Genomics/Transcriptomics in Disease

Symposium

Mon. 3:45 pm—San Diego Convention Center, Room 1B

Chaired: M. Snyder

3:45                        Chair’s introduction.

3:50      235.1       Deep methylomes reveal diverse roles of DNA methylation in human tissues J.R. Ecker, M. Schultz, Y. He, M. Hariharan, J. Whitaker, J. Nery, M. Urich, H. Chen, D. Leung, N. Rajagopal, S. Lin, Y. Lin, M. Snyder, W. Wang and B. Ren. Salk Inst. for Biol. Studies, UCSD, Ludwig Inst. for Cancer Res., Stanford Univ. and Washington Univ. Sch. of Med.

4:15                        Heritable transformation of adaptive landscapes elicited by transient expression of intrinsically disordered proteins D. Jarosz. Stanford Univ. (586.2)

4:30      235.2       A network approach to understanding drug resistance D. Pe’er. Columbia Univ.

4:55                        Genetic variability in CRHR1 and its association with participant response to glucocorticoid receptor-mediated signaling R.S. Knox, K.M. Biette, O.J. Fox and P.J.M. Murphy. Seattle Univ. and Harvard Med. Sch. (776.2)

5:10                        Genetic variation affecting temporal patterns of gene expression and disease in human brain H. Fraser and T. Martin. Stanford Univ. (776.1)

5:25      235.3       Systems analysis of mitochondrial pathogenesis V.K. Mootha. Harvard Med Sch and MGH.

5:50                        Discussion.

 

350.   Metabolomics

Symposium

Tue. 9:55 am—San Diego Convention Center, Room 1B

Chaired: R. Aebersold

This session features the Molecular and Cellular Proteomics (MCP) Sponsored Lectureship. Lecturer: O. Fiehn.

9:55                        Chair’s introduction.

10:00    350.1       Towards the genetic architecture of the human metabolome R. Gerszten. Massachusetts Gen. Hosp.

10:25                      Integrative analysis of microbiome and metabolome in mouse model simulating features of post-traumatic stress disorder A. Gautam, B. Sowe, D. Donohue, R. Kumar, S. Muhie, N. Chakraborty, A. Hoke, R. Hammamieh and M. Jett. U.S. Army Ctr. for Envrn. Hlth. Res. and Leidos Biomed. Res. Inc., Frederick, MD. (982.1)

10:40    350.2       Metabolomic phenotyping of cancer metabolism O. Fiehn and B. Wikoff. Univ. of California, Davis.

11:05                      1H-NMR metabolomic biomarkers of poor outcome after hemorrhagic shock are absent in hibernators L.K. Bogren, C.J. Murphy, E.L. Johnston, N.J. Serkova and K.L. Drew. Univ. of Alaska Fairbanks and Univ. of Colorado Denver, Aurora. (590.1)

11:20                      Sirtuin regulation of lysine acylation targets diverse metabolic networks in hepatic mitochondria M. Rardin, W. He, A. Sahu, Y. Nishida, E. Verdin and B.W. Gibson. Buck Inst., Novato, CA and Gladstone Insts. and UCSF. (981.3)

11:35    350.3       Mass spectrometry-based metabolomics as a unique biochemical approach for understanding disease pathogenesis G. Siuzdak. The Scripps Res. Inst.

12:00                                       Discussion.

 

475.   Omics and the Development of Personalized Medicine

Symposium

Wed. 1:45 pm—San Diego Convention Center, Room 1B

Chaired: R. A. Bradshaw

1:45                        Chair’s introduction.

1:50      475.1       Personalized medicine: personal omics profiling of healthy and disease states M. Snyder. Stanford Univ.

2:15                        Time-course analysis of gene expression in a mouse model simulating aspects of human post-traumatic stress disorder S. Muhie, S. Srinivasan, A. Gautam, N. Chakraborty, R. Hammamieh and M. Jett. U.S. Army Ctr. of Envrn. Hlth. Res., Frederick, MD and NCI-Frederick. (776.7)

2:30      475.2       Large-scale development and implementation of highly sensitive, multiplex MRM-based assays for quantification of proteins in biological settings A. Paulovich. Fred Hutchinson Cancer Res. Ctr.

2:55                        Development of peptidomic assays for discovery of endogenously processed peptides from the healthy and juvenile idiopathic arthritis human synovial fluid C.C. Clement and L. Santambrogio. Albert Einstein Col. of Med. (981.9)

3:10                        Quantitative proteomics identification of potential protein biomarkers of early recovery after kidney transplant K.R. Williams, C.M. Colangelo, K.L. Stone, L. Chung, T. Abbott, J. Belcher, A. Marlier, L. Cantley and C.R. Parikh. Yale Univ. Sch. of Med. (591.5)

3:25      475.3       Assembly and interrogation of regulatory networks elucidates synergistic dependencies in human malignancies A. Califano. Columbia Univ.

3:50                        Discussion.

 

 

Post-translational Protein Regulation and Modification

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THEME ORGANIZERS
Randy Hampton, UCSD and
Andreas Martin, UC Berkeley

98.     Protein Modification in Prokaryotes and Pathogens

Symposium

Sun. 9:55 am—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6E

Chaired: R. Hampton

9:55                        Chair’s introduction.

10:00    98.1          Ubiquitin-like protein modification and proteasomes in Archaea J. Maupin-Furlow, S. Cao, N.E. Chavarria, X. Fu, N.L. Hepowit, S. Hwang, J. Martin, L. McMillian, H.V. Miranda and Y. Wu. Univ. of Florida.

10:25                      Perturbation of global host sumoylation by the papillomavirus E6 protein V.G. Wilson, P. Heaton and A. Deyrieux. Texas A&M Univ. Hlth. Sci. Ctr., Bryan and Mayo Clin. (555.3)

10:40    98.2          The mycobacterial pupylation pathway E. Weber-Ban, J. Barandun and C. Delley. ETH Zurich.

11:05                      Role of protein prenyltransferases in modifying effectors from infectious bacterium E. Wright and C. Fierke. Univ. of Michigan. (739.7)

11:20                      A viral peptide deformylase-ribosome complex reveals mechanism of host gene expression control C. Giglione, R. Grzela, P. Bron, J. Lai Kee Him, S. Fieulaine, J. Nusbaum, A. Pozza, W. Bienvenut and T. Meinnel. INSERM-CNRS, Montpellier and CNRS, Gif sur Yvette. (558.2)

11:35    98.3          Post-translational modifications of host proteins in pathogen defense R. Xavier. Massachusetts Gen. Hosp.

12:00                      Discussion

 

237.   Autophagy

Symposium

Mon. 3:45 pm—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6E

Chaired: A. Martin

3:45      Chair’s introduction.

3:50      237.1       Unique two conjugation systems required for autophagy Y. Ohsumi. Tokyo Institute of Technology.

4:15                        Lysosomal interaction of Akt with Phafin2: a critical step in the induction of autophagy M. Noguchi, M. Matsuda-Lennikov, N. Hirata, M. Hashimoto, K. Kimura, T. Edamura and F. Suizu. Hokkaido Univ., Japan. (737.1)

4:30      237.2       The beginning of the end: how the Atg1 scaffold nucleates autophagosome biogenesis J.H. Hurley, R.E. Stanley and M.J. Ragusa. UC Berkeley and NIH/NIDDK.

4:55                        Vacuolin-1 inhibits autophagy by activating rab5 J. Yue and Y. Lu. Univ. of Hong Kong. (737.7)

5:10                        A role for mitochondrial dynamics in the segregation of mitochondrial matrix proteins during stationary phase mitophagy H. Abeliovich, M. Zarei, K.T. Rigbolt and R.J. Youle. Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem, Univ. of Freiburg, Germany and NINDS, NIH. (557.1)

5:25      237.3       Selective autophagy in the cellular stress response A.M. Cuervo. Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

5:50                        Discussion

 

353.   Ubiquitination

Symposium

Tue. 9:55 am—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6E

Chaired: R. Xavier

9:55                        Chair’s introduction.

10:00    353.1       Using the ubiquitin-modified proteome to monitor protein synthesis fidelity E.J. Bennett, K. Webb, N. Zuzow and J.M. Gendron. UCSD.

10:25                      Heat-induced degrons and the co-chaperone Ydj1-adaptor mediate the ubiquitination of misfolded proteins by the Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase upon stress N. Fang and T. Mayor. Univ. of British Columbia. (558.1)

10:40    353.2       Studying atypical ubiquitin chains with deubiquitinases D. Komander. MRC Lab. of Molec. Bio.

11:05                      A second degradation signal within the short-lived transcription factor MATalpha2 C.M. Hickey and M. Hochstrasser. Yale Univ. (937.1)

11:20                      Proteasomal inhibition effects Notch signaling E.M. Chambers, A. Hsu and B. White. San Jose State Univ. (937.2)

11:35    353.3       Regulated quality control in physiological regulation of cellular processes: lessons from regulated ERAD of HMG-CoA reductase S. Neal, L. Ornelas, M. Ruckstuhl, A. Singh, X. Tang, N. Vashista, M. Wangeline and R. Hampton. UCSD.

12:00                      Discussion

 

478.   Proteasomes

Symposium

Wed. 1:45 pm—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6E

1:45                        Chair’s Introduction

1:50      478.1       Evolution of the role of Cdc48 and its interactions with the 20S peptidase R.T. Sauer, D. Barthelme, J. Grabenstatter, R. Jauregui, J.Z. Chen and T.A. Baker. MIT and MIT/HHMI.

2:15                        Signaling control of proteasome, immunoproteasome, and PA28 regulator gene expression during adaptation to oxidative stress K.J.A. Davies. Univ. of Southern California. (555.11)

2:30      478.2       Substrate degradation by the 26S proteasome A. Martin, M. Matyskiela, R. Beckwith, K. Nyquist, E. Worden, E. Estrin and G. Lander. Univ. of California, Berkeley and The Scripps Res. Inst.

2:55                        Resveratrol, a novel natural proteasome inhibitor N. Qureshi, J.C. Reis and A.A. Qureshi. Univ. of Missouri Med. Sch., Kansas City. (935.3)

3:10                        Adaptor-guided proteolysis initiates on the ribosome N. Puri and W. Karzai. Stony Brook Univ. (932.1)

3:25      478.3       Dynamic control of 26S proteasome function at CNS synapses G. Patrick. UCSD.

3:50                        Discussion

 

 

Protein Synthesis, Folding, Localization and Quality Control

 

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THEME ORGANIZERS
Ruben L. Gonzalez, Jr., Columbia Univ and
Shu-ou Shan, California Inst of Technology

109.   Mechanism and Regulation of Protein Synthesis

Symposium

Sun. 3:45 pm—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6E

Chaired: S. Cavagnero

3:45      Chair’s introduction.

3:50      109.1       The structural dynamics of translation initiation M.M. Elvekrog, J. Wang, K. Caban, D.D. MacDougall and R.L. Gonzalez, Jr. Columbia Univ. and UCSF.

4:15                        New structural insights into cap-independent translation initiation A. Brilot, C.S. Koh, N. Grigorieff and A. Korostelev. Brandeis Univ., Univ. of Massachusetts Med. Sch. and Janelia Farm Res. Campus, Ashburn, VA. (566.6)

4:30      109.2       Ribosome structural dynamics during translation H.F. Noller, J. Zhou, L. Lancaster, J.P. Donohue, Z. Guo and X. Li. UCSC.

4:55                        Elongation factor G undergoes an extensive structural rearrangement during ribosomal translocation D.N. Ermolenko, E. Salsi and E. Farah. Sch. of Med. and Dent., Univ. of Rochester. (752.3)

5:10      Mechanistic studies of ribosome-dependent toxins active during the stringent response C.M. Dunham, M.A. Schureck, T. Maehigashi, A. Ruangprasert, J. Dunkle and S.J. Miles. Emory Univ. (566.8)

5:25      109.3       Programmed ribosomal frameshifting occurs at multiple sites and by multiple paths I. Tinoco, Jr., S. Yan and H-K. Kim. Univ. of California, Berkeley.

5:50                        Discussion.

 

226.   Protein Folding and Processing

Symposium

Mon. 9:55 am—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6E

Chaired: R. L. Gonzalez, Jr.

9:55                        Chair’s introduction.

10:00    226.1       Exploring the mechanism of protein birth S. Cavagnero. Univ. of Wisconsin.

10:25                      Structure and dynamics of ribosome-bound nascent chains: insights from NMR spectroscopy J. Christodoulou. University Col. London. (752.2)

10:40    226.2       Chaperone discovery J. Bardwell. Univ. of Michigan.

11:05                      Mapping the binding interactions between a specialized Hsp70 chaperone and its Hsp40 co-chaperone: a direct role for the Hsp40 HPD motif T.R. Alderson, J.H. Kim and J.L. Markley. Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison. (567.5)

11:20                      Chemical protein folding probes to quantify folded and functional cellular proteins to understand proteostasis network functions X. Zhang, Y. Liu, Y.L. Tan and J.W. Kelly. The Scripps Res. Inst. (753.1)

11:35    226.3       Mechanisms of cellular proteostasis: insights from single molecule approaches C. Bustamante, C. Kaiser, I. Tinoco and D. Goldman. Univ. of California, Berkeley.

12:00                      Discussion.

 

362.   Protein Localization: Targeting and Translocation

Symposium

Tue. 3:45 pm—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6E

Chaired: H. Zaher  

 3:45        Chair’s introduction.

3:50      362.1       Molecular interplay at the ribosome exit site S-o. Shan and A. Ariosa. Caltech.

4:15                        Experimental and computational analysis of peroxisome protein targeting J. Berg. Univ. of Pittsburgh. (948.10)

4:30      362.2       Structural basis of membrane protein insertion: regulation of the SRP and GET systems I. Sinning. Heidelberg Univ.

4:55                        The structure of a tail-anchor membrane protein-binding complex reveals the regulation of Get3 by Get4 H.B. Gristick, M. Rao, J.W. Chartron, M.E. Rome, S-o. Shan and W.M. Clemons. Caltech. (950.4)

5:10      362.3       Investigation of SecY protein-translocation channel in action using a novel in vivo tool E. Park, C. Akey and T. Rapoport. HHMI, Harvard Med. Sch. and Boston Univ. Sch. of Med.

5:25      362.4       Mechanistic insights on the preprotein translocase: a single molecule study A. Driessen. Univ. of Groningen.

5:50                        Discussion.

 

472.   Protein Quality Control

Symposium

Wed. 9:55 am—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6E

Chaired: S. Shan

9:55                        Chair’s introduction.

10:00    472.1       Tumor suppression by mitotic quality control M. Rape. HHMI.

10:25                      Molecular mechanisms of substrate degradation by the 26S proteasome revealed by CryoEM M.E. Matyskiela, G. Lander and A. Martin. Univ. of California, Berkeley and The Scripps Res. Inst. (952.6)

10:40    472.2       Exploiting protein homeostasis for cancer therapy R. Deshaies, T-F. Chou, J. Li, A. Mackinnon and F. Parlati. Caltech and HHMI.

11:05                      A role for the ribosome in deciding the fate of damaged RNA H. Zaher. Washington Univ. in St. Louis. (752.10)

11:20                      A Tale of Two Distinct Mechanisms for IRE1 RNase M. Niwa. UCSD. (752.9)

11:35    472.3       Regulation of Torsin ATPases C. Schlieker. Yale Univ.

12:00                      Discussion.

 

 

RNA Processing and Transcription

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THEME ORGANIZERS
Karen M. Arndt, Univ of Pittsburgh and
Karla M. Neugebauer, Yale Univ

108.   Regulation of Transcription, Chromatin, and RNA Processing

Symposium

Sun. 3:45 pm—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6D

Chaired: K. M. Neugebauer

3:45      Chair’s introduction.

3:50      108.1       Histone modification and exchange during gene transcription: signals and mechanisms J. Workman, S. Venkatesh and M. Smolle. Stowers Instit. for Med. Res.

4:15                        The Rpb4/7 module connects the Ccr4-Not complex to elongating RNA polymerase II: implications for the coordination of synthesis and decay J. Reese, V. Babbarwal, J.E. Miller and J. Fu. Penn State and Med. Col. of Wisconsin. (560.10)

4:30      108.2       Mechanisms that couple histone modifications to transcription elongation and regulate transcription termination K. Arndt, M.K. Shirra, S.B. Van Oss, C.E. Cucinotta and B.N. Tomson. Univ. of Pittsburgh.

4:55                        Poly(A)-dependent transcription termination does not require poly(A) site cleavage H. Zhang and H. Martinson. UCLA. (947.1)

5:10      Coupling between alternative polyadenylation and alternative splicing is limited to terminal introns M. Movassat, T.L. Crabb, A. Busch, Y. Shi and K.J. Hertel. Univ. of California, Irvine. (560.2)

5:25      108.3       Single-molecule imaging of pre-mRNA splicing in situ T. Sanjay. Rutgers Univ.

5:50                        Discussion

 

225.   Probing Mechanisms in Gene Expression with Global Methods

Symposium

Mon. 9:55 am—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6D

Chaired: J. Brickner

9:55                        Chair’s introduction.

10:00    225.1       Genome-wide organization of chromatin and the transcription machinery F. Pugh. Penn State.

10:25                      Short-range and long-range transcriptional repressors exhibit distinct and highly context-specific chromatin signatures D.N. Arnosti, K. Kok, D. Morsdorf and S. Payankaulam. Michigan State Univ. (741.2)

10:40    225.2       Gene expression genomics in T cells S. Teichmann. EMBL-European Bioinformat. Inst. and Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst.

11:05                      Nucleosome binding and cell-type specific gene expression A. Gjidoda, M. Tagore, M.J. McAndrew and M. Floer. Michigan State Univ. (561.4)

11:20                      Somatic spliceosomal factor mutations in bone marrow neoplasms — downstream effects and mechanistic insights R. Padgett, R. Dietrich, J. Singh, B. Przychodzen, H. Makishima and J. Maciejewski. Cleveland Clin. (560.3)

11:35    225.3       Dynamic regulation of cleavage and polyadenylation in differentiation and development B. Tian. Rutgers New Jersey Med. Sch.

12:00                      Discussion

 

361.   Structural and Mechanistic Insights into Transcription and RNA Processing

Symposium

Tue. 3:45 pm—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6D

Chaired: A. Akhtar

3:45                        Chair’s introduction.

3:50      361.1       Structural and mechanistic insights into the SAGA coactivator complex C. Wolberger. HHMI/Johns Hopkins Univ. Sch. of Med.

4:15                        Regulation of ALC1 (amplified in liver cancer) involves interplay between the SNF2 ATPase domain, PAR binding macrodomain and other conserved elements R.D. Trivedi, A. Gottschalk, J.W. Conaway and R.C. Conaway. Stowers Inst. for Med. Res. and Univ. of Kansas Med. Ctr. and Stowers Inst. for Med. Res. (563.1)

4:30      361.2       Catalyzing and proofreading pre-mRNA splicing J.P. Staley, S. Fica, D. Semlow, M. Mefford, P. Koodathingal, N. Tuttle, T. Novak, N-S. Li, Q. Dai and J. Piccirilli. Univ. of Chicago.

4:55                        Understanding how two related RNA binding proteins determine different splicing outcomes N.M. Keppetipola, K-H. Yeom, A.L. Hernandez, A.A. Vashisht, J.A. Wohlschlegel and D.L. Black. California State Univ., Fullerton and UCLA. (742.2)

5:10                        Probing the architecture of the Mediator complex E. Sierecki, M. Polinkovsky, N. Giles, M. Moustaqil, K. Alexandrov and Y. Gambin. Univ. of Queensland, Australia. (939.3)

5:25      361.3       All it takes to express virulence genes I. Artsimovitch, Z. Liu, M. NandyMazumdar and S.K. Tomar. The Ohio State Univ.

5:50                        Discussion

 

471.   The Cell Biology of Transcription, Chromatin and RNA

Symposium

Wed. 9:55 am—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6D

Chaired: K. Arndt

9:55                        Chair’s introduction.

10:00    471.1       Epigenetic regulation of the X chromosome A. Akhtar. MPI Freiburg.

10:25                      The dynamic chromatin configuration during pituitary differentiation Y. Ho, N.E. Cooke and S.A. Liebhaber. Perelman Sch. of Med., Univ. of Pennsylvania. (562.1)

10:40    471.2       The role of nuclear pore proteins in epigenetic regulation and spatial organization of the genome J. Brickner. Northwestern Univ.

11:05                      Gene loops enhance mRNA export in yeast B.N. Singh and M. Hampsey. Rutgers Univ., Robert Wood Johnson Med. Sch. (560.8)

11:20                      Messenger RNAs and cognate microRNAs in the nucleolus P. Reyes-Gutierrez, J.C.R. Politz and T. Pederson. Univ. of Massachusetts Med. Sch. and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Res. Ctr. (940.3)

11:35    471.3       Nuclear bodies: RNA-rich powerhouses of the cell K.M. Neugebauer, M. Machyna, K. Straube and P. Heyn. Yale Univ. and Max Planck Inst. of Molec. Cell Biol. and Genet.

12:00                      Discussion

 

 

 

Science of Addiction

This theme is sponsored by the ASBMB Minority Affairs Committee (MAC)

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 THEME ORGANIZERS
Squire J. Booker, Penn State Univ and
Habibeh Khoshbouei, Univ of Florida

 

105.   Careers in Science Policy

Symposium

Sun. 3:45 pm—San Diego Convention Center, Room 1A

This session will explore professions in the field of Science Policy and the career paths of each presenter. A panel discussion, with audience questions will follow the presentations.

Chair: S. J. Booker

Presenters:
B. Corb, Director of Public Affairs, ASBMB
J.M. Gitlin, Science Policy Analyst, NHGRI, NIH
C. Robinson, Director, Science & Technology Policy Fellowships, AAAS

 

222.   Molecular Basis of Addiction: Neurocognitive Deficits and Memory

Symposium

Mon. 9:55 am—San Diego Convention Center, Room 1A

Chaired: U. Gether

9:55                        Chair’s introduction.

10:00    222.1       Epigenetic mechanisms in reward conditioning D. Sweatt. Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham.

10:25                      Amphetamine exposure during development causes epigenetic trans-generational changes in drug sensitivity in Caenorhabditis elegans T. McCowan, B. Safratowich, J. Ohm and L. Carvelli. Univ. of North Dakota. (803.8)

10:40    222.2       Methamphetamine abuse usurps hippocampal neural network operations undergirding memory consolidation S. Chirwa, A. Aduonum and H. Khoshbouei. Meharry Med.Col. PCOM - Georgia Campus and Univ. of Florida.

11:05                      Preclinical efficacy of the dual sigma receptor antagonist dopamine uptake inhibitor, CM699, as a medication for stimulant abuse J.L. Katz, T. Hiranita, J. Lopez, A. Brellenthin, C. Mesangeau, W. Alsharif, T. Kopajtic, M. Coggiano, S. Jamalapuram, S-Y. Tsai, B.A. Avery, T-P. Su, G. Tanda and C. McCurdy. NIDA, NIH, Baltimore and Sch. of Pharm., Univ. of Mississippi. (803.3)

11:20                      Multiple palmitoyl acyltransferases modify DAT palmitoylation D.E. Rastedt, J.D. Foster and R.A. Vaughan. Univ. of North Dakota. (803.5)

11:35    222.3       Cognitive effects of methamphetamine in humans: separating fact from hysteria C. Hart. Columbia Univ.

12:00                      Discussion.

 

358.   Molecular Basis of Addiction: Transporters

Symposium

Tue. 3:45 pm—San Diego Convention Center, Room 1A

Chaired: S. Chirwa

3:45                        Chair’s introduction.

3:50      358.1       Phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate regulates psychostimulant behaviors via a membrane protein interaction A. Galli. Vanderbilt Univ.

4:15                        Post-phosphorylation control of dopamine transporter by peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase PIN1 S. Challasivakanaka, M.A. Smith, J.D. Foster and R.A. Vaughan. Univ. of North Dakota. (803.6)

4:33      358.2       The molecular mechanism of amphetamine action H.H. Sitte, T. Hofmaier, A. Anderluh, O. Kudlacek, E. Klotzsch, J-W. Yang, P. Geier, K. Schicker, S. Böhm and G. Schütz. Med. Univ. of Vienna and Tech. Univ. of Vienna.

4:58                        Phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate regulates psychostimulant behaviors through its interaction with the dopamine transporter P.J. Hamilton, A.N. Belovich, G. Khelashvili, C. Saunders, K. Erreger, J.A. Javitch, H.H. Sitte, H. Weinstein, H.J. Matthies and A. Galli. Vanderbilt Univ., Weill Cornell Med. Col. of Cornell Univ., Columbia Univ. Col. of P&S and Med. Univ. Vienna. (803.2)

5:16      358.3       The dopamine transporter: genetic mouse models, psychostimulant addiction and neuropsychiatric disorders U. Gether. Univ. of Copenhagen.

3:41                        Discussion.

 

468.   Molecular Basis of Addiction: Synaptic Modification

Symposium

Wed. 9:55 am—San Diego Convention Center, Room 1A

Chaired: H. Sitte

9:55                        Chair’s introduction.

10:00    468.1       Relevance of GPCR functional selectivity/biased signaling to drugs of abuse M.G. Caron, N.M. Urs, S.M. Peterson, T.L. Daigle and J.C. Snyder. Duke Univ. Med. Ctr.

10:25                      Regulator of G protein signaling 6 promotes anxiety and depression by attenuating serotonin-mediated activation of the 5-HT1A receptor-adenylyl cyclase axis A. Stewart, B. Maity, A.M. Wunsch, F. Meng, Q. Wu, J.A. Wemmie and R.A. Fisher. Univ. of Iowa and VA Med. Ctr. (803.12)

10:40    468.2       Cellular mechanisms of addiction P.J. Kenny. Icahn Sch. of Med. at Mount Sinai.

11:05                      Proteomic analysis of chronic morphine treated SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells K.V. Randell, E. Taka and C.B. Goodman. Florida A&M Univ. (803.10)

11:20                      Identification of the attachment site for the cocaine analog [125I]JHC 2-48 on the dopamine transporter R.A. Dahal, P. Akula Bala, B. Sharma, J.H. Cha, J. Cao, C. Boateng, J. Lever, A. Newman, J. Foster, L.K. Henry and R. Vaughan. Univ. of North Dakota,NIDA, NIH, Baltimore and Univ. of Missouri and Truman VA. (803.7)

11:35    468.3       Synaptic selection by dopamine neurotransmission D. Sulzer. Columbia Univ.

12:00                      Discussion.

 

 

 

 

Signal Transduction

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THEME ORGANIZERS
Kim Orth, UT Southwestern Med Ctr and
Sivaraj Sivaramakrishnan, Univ of Michigan

 

99.     Manipulation of Cell Signaling by Pathogens

Symposium

Sun. 9:55 am—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6F

Chaired: Y. Chook

9:55                        Chair’s introduction.

10:00    99.1          Black spot, black death, black pearl: the tales of bacterial effectors K. Orth. Univ. of Texas Southwestern Med. Ctr.

10:25                      Pathogen-mediated regulation of small GTPases M.R. Neunuebel, Y. Chen, P.S. Backlund and M.P. Machner. NICHD, NIH and Sch. of Life Sci., Beijing. (739.9)

10:40    99.2          Secretory kinases in parasites block innate immunity D. Sibley. Washington Univ.

11:05                      Modulation of Notch signaling by intracellular bacterial toxins J.L. Larabee and J.D. Ballard. Univ. of Oklahoma Hlth. Sci. Ctr. (610.3)

11:20    99.3          Pathogen-induced lipid coalescence in the host membrane causes downstream activation of Rho GTPase  A-M. Krachler Sch. of Biosci., Univ. of Birmingham

11:35    99.4          Exploitation of host cell processes for bacterial cell-to-cell spread J. Theriot and M. Rengarajan. Sch. of Med., Stanford Univ.

12:00                      Discussion

 

238.   Signaling across the Nuclear Envelope

Symposium

Mon. 3:45 pm—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6F

Chaired: K. Orth

3:45      Chair’s introduction.

3:50      238.1       Signals and blockers in karyopherin-mediated transport Y. Chook. UT Southwestern Med Ctr.

4:15                        Molecular basis for import cargo discrimination by importin α isoforms R. Pumroy and G. Cingolani. Thomas Jefferson Univ. (793.2)

4:30      238.2       Sculpting the chromatin landscape: a role for nuclear pore complexes in gene silencing R.W. Wozniak. University of Alberta.

4:55                        Dysregulated affinity of lamin A to SUN1 induces nuclear and endoplasmic reticulum aberrancies in progeric laminopathies Y-H. Chi. Natl. Hlth. Res. Insts., Miaoli Cty., Taiwan. (1009.1)

5:10                        Disruption of the nuclear membrane by the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 leads to the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps A. Neumann, L. Völlger, A. Nerlich, T. Meerloo, R. Gallo, V. Nizet, H. Naim and M. von Köckritz-Blickwede. Univ. of Vet. Med. Hannover and UCSD. (793.1)

5:25      238.3       Nuclear transport and gene expression K. Weis. UC Berkeley.

5:50                        Discussion

 

354.   Structural Dynamics in Cell Signaling

Symposium

Tue. 9:55 am—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6F

Chaired: A. Dunn

9:55                        Chair’s introduction.

10:00    354.1       Correlation between conformational dynamics and activity in protein kinase A G. Veglia. Univ of Minnesota.

10:25                      Deciphering the dynamic regulation of phosphoinositide 3-kinases downstream of G-protein coupled receptors and receptor tyrosine kinases J.E. Burke, O. Vadas, O. Perisic and R.L. Williams. MRC Lab. of Molec. Biol., Cambridge. (1008.1)

10:40    354.2       Ubiquitin and intracellular signaling by G protein-coupled receptors J. Trejo. UCSD.

11:05                      Exploitation of latent allostery enables the evolution of new modes of MAP kinase regulation S. Coyle and W. Lim. UCSF. (609.5)

11:20                      Rapamycin-responsiveness and Gln3-Tor1 interaction are associated with different target sites on the Gln3 protein T.G. Cooper, R. Rai and J.J. Tate. Univ. of Tennessee Hlth. Sci. Ctr. (609.13)

11:35    354.3       Bridging protein structure and intrinsic function in cell signaling S. Sivaramakrishnan. Univ. of Michigan.

12:00                      Discussion

 

479.   Mechanotransduction: Cytosol to Nucleus

Symposium

Wed. 1:45 pm—San Diego Convention Center, Room 6F

Chaired: S. Sivaramakrishnan

1:45                        Chair’s introduction.

1:50      479.1       Mechanical force transmission at single integrin complexes in living cells A. Dunn, A. Mekhdjian, M. Morimatsu and A. Adhikari. Stanford Univ.

2:15      479.2       Twist1 induces dissemination by activating an epithelial motility program that requires E-cadherin  E.R. Shamir, E. Pappalardo, P.T. Tran, J.S. Bader and A.J. Ewald. Johns Hopkins Univ.

2:30      479.3       Modularity in nuclear mechanotransduction and genome regulation G. Shivashankar  Natl. Univ. of Singapore.

2:55      479.4       Cellular geometry regulates traction stresses  P.W. Oakes, S. Banerjee, M.C. Marchetti and M.L. Gardel. Univ. of Chicago and Syracuse Univ.

3:10                        Stress-activated signaling in endothelial cells A. Rowan, S.L. Farwell and L. Lowe-Krentz. Lehigh Univ. (609.21)

3:25      479.5       Illuminating the mechanics of touch M.B. Goodman. Stanford Univ. Sch. of Med.

3:50                        Discussion