2013 ASBMB Annual Meeting Program

Public Policy and Science Outreach

Events are scheduled in the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center, 415 Summer Street, unless otherwise noted.

How Scientists Can Save the World
sponsored by the ASBMB Public Affairs Advisory Committee
Sunday, April 21, 12:45 - 2:30 pm, Room 258

Join the leading names in science and public policy as we discuss the massive challenges facing society in the next 100 years. Learn how science holds many of the solutions to problems like hunger, health, and sustainability - and how to be an advocate for science. 

Moderator:
Jeremy M. Berg, ASBMB President, Univ. of Pittsburgh
Panelists:
Tania Baker, MIT
Darlene Cavalier, Science Cheerleader
Craig Mello, Univ. of Massachusetts
 

Public Outreach and Science Communication Events & Workshops
sponsored by the ASBMB Public Outreach Committee 

Organizers:
Hannah Alexander, Univ of Missouri and Tom Baldwin, UC, Riverside

This interactive program teaches attendees techniques for effectively communicating their science to the lay public, including a behind-the-scenes look at how to host your own science café, followed by an actual café and networking event.

Science Outreach Posters
Saturday, April 20, during the evening's Opening Reception, West Ballroom Foyer

Successful outreach programs will be featured to help inform attendees on how to get involved for themselves! Submit to ASBMB late-breaking topic category #224

“What is a Germ?” Challenge
Sunday, April 21, 11:00 AM, this event is offsite at the Cambridge Science Festival's Curiosity Challenge  

Can you explain what a germ is to a 5th grader? Step up and enter our, “What is a Germ?” Challenge. Click here for Challenge details and submission guidelines.

From the Lab to the Kitchen Table – Communicating Science to a Lay Audience
Monday, April 22, 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm, Room 255

Science and Me” – a student driven science outreach program for adult audiences
Hannah Alexander, Univ of Missouri

Takin' It to the Streets
P.A. d’Arbeloff, Cambridge Science Festival

Learning to Communicate- A graduate training course in science communication
Tom Baldwin, UC, Riverside

Community-based projects that complement learning in a biochemistry course
Jon Dattelbaum, Univ of Richmond

The Science & Entertainment Exchange:  1-800-I-Need-a-Scientist!
Ann M. Merchant, The Science and Entertainment Exchange

FameLab: Communicating Your Science
Daniella M. Scalice, NASA Astrobiology Inst

Do-it-yourself: Building the voice of young science
Morgan Thompson, Harvard Univ

ASBMB Science Café: The New Social Networking Event
Monday, April 22, 7:00 pm - 9:30 pm
Westin Boston Waterfront Hotel, Sauciety Restaurant

Presented by the team at Sciencecafes.org 

Science Cafés 101: An Interactive Guide to Organizing Your Own Science Cafe
Tuesday, April 23, 12:30 pm - 2:30 pm, Room 255 

Presented by the team at Sciencecafes.org  


 

 

Transitions, Education and Professional Development

This theme is sponsored by the ASBMB Education and Professional Development Committee (EPD) 

Theme Organizers
Peter Kennelly, VA Tech and
Dorit Zuk, NIH

22.        FOSTERING PARTNERSHIPS BETWEEN COLLEGES, UNIVERSITITES AND K-12 SCHOOLS
Workshop
Advance registration required
SAT.  9:00 AM-BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 251

This workshop is designed for junior high and high school teachers and college/university faculty and researchers who are interested in forming collaborative partnerships to bring creative, cutting-edge, and hands-on science into K-12 classrooms. 


26.        DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE, A WORKSHOP: BEYOND COLLEGE: COPING WITH SOME COMMON CHALLENGES
Undergraduate Workshop
SAT. 4:45 PM-BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 50, Exhibits Level
CHAIRED: D.ZUK

4:45                        Career paths after graduation from college. D. Kim. MIT.

89.          TRANSITIONING BEYOND THE BENCH
Symposium
SUN. 9:55 AM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 251
CHAIRED: D. A. ROCKCLIFFE
 

9:55                        Chair’s introduction. 

10:00     89.1        Careers beyond the bench – an overview. D. Zuk. NIH. 

10:10                     Incorporating biotechnology in the high school classroom: professional development for biology teachers. J.L. Bisogno and M.J. Koroly. Univ. of Florida. (838.6) 

10:20     89.2        Moving from the lab to the law. R. Plotkin. Robert Plotkin PC, Burlington, MA. 

10:30                     The MESA program advantage in STEM education. R. Bakhiet, T. Carcia and R. Alvarez. Southwestern Col., CA, San Diego State Univ. Col. of Engin. and San Diego City Col. (838.14) 

10:40     89.3        One teacher’s journey from the bench to the classroom. J. Cruzan. Moses Brown Sch., RI. 

10:50                     Discussion. 


88.          JOBS IN INDUSTRY
Symposium
(Sponsored by: ASBMB Minority Affairs Committee)
SUN. 9:55 AM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 253B
CHAIRED: N. O. CONCHA 

9:55                        Chair’s introduction. 

10:00     88.1        Scientific jobs – an industrial perspective. N.O. Concha. GlaxoSmithKline. 

10:30     88.2        Life as a minority scientist in industry and academia. G.D. Dotson. Univ. of Michigan Col. of Pharm. 

11:00     88.3        What are the advantages/disadvantages of postdoctoral training in industry? L. Saleh. New England Biolabs, Ipswich, MA. 

11:30                     Panel discussion. 


91.          ASBMB AWARD FOR EXEMPLARY CONTRIBUTIONS TO EDUCATION LECTURE
Award
(Sponsored by: ASBMB Education and Professional Development Committee)
SUN. 12:30 PM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 257AB
Undergraduate Poster Competition awards will be presented during this lecture. 

12:30                     Introductory remarks and awards presentation. M. Bradley and K. Cornely. 

12:45     91.1        From the classroom to communities: connecting students in the sciences to real world situations. J.M. Ntambi. Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison. 


100.        NAVIGATING MID-CAREER TRANSITIONS
Symposium
SUN. 3:45 PM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 251
CHAIRED: D. ZUK 

3:45                        Chair’s introduction. 

3:50        100.1     Mid-career adventure: making a successful transition. D. Koen. Naturejobs, Rochester, NY. 

4:20                        UF CPET: professional development for secondary science teachers. H.A. Darwiche, J. Bokor, D. Joseph and M.J. Koroly. Univ. of Florida. (838.7) 

4:35        100.2     One life scientist’s experience with mid-career transitions. A.D. Robertson. Natl. Psoriasis Fndn., Portland, OR. 

5:05                        A picture is worth a thousand data points: an analysis of textbook visualizations in the molecular life sciences. E. Offerdahl and J. Arneson. North Dakota State Univ. (838.13) 

5:20        100.3     From mom to prof: make an effort. O.J. Finn. Univ. of Pittsburgh. 

5:50                        Discussion and closing remarks. 


205.        TRANSITIONING FROM STUDENT TO PROFESSIONAL
Symposium
MON. 9:55 AM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 257
CHAIRED: O. FINN 

9:55                        Chair’s introduction. 

10:00     205.1     The first big leap, college to graduate school. P.J. Kennelly. Virginia Tech. 

10:25                     Student conceptions and misconceptions about energy transformations in biochemistry. A.J. Wolfson, S.L. Rowland, G.A. Lawrie and T.H. Wright. Wellesley Col. and Univ. of Queensland, Australia. (838.3) 

10:40                     Talk title tba, A. K. Hall, NIGMS/NIH. 

11:05                     The Pre-health Collection within MedEdPORTAL’s iCollaborative: faculty resources to prepare students for the MCAT2015. H.V. Jakubowski and L.S. Zapanta. Col. of Saint Benedict, St. John’s Univ., MN and Univ. of Pittsburgh. (838.2) 

11:20                     A certificate program to help bachelor’s degree graduates transition into careers in the bioscience industry. M. Wallert and J. Provost. Minnesota State Univ. Moorhead. (838.15) 

11:35     205.3     The presidential postdoctoral program at Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research. L. Pond. Novartis Insts. for BioMed. Res. 

12:00                     Discussion and closing remarks. 


206.        ASBMB CERTIFICATION PROGRAM FOR BACHELOR’S DEGREES IN BIOCHEMISTRY, MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND RELATED MAJORS
Symposium
MON. 12:30 PM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 257B 

ASBMB has initiated roll-out of an outcomes-based degree certification program for undergraduates majoring in Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and related majors.  The objectives of the program are to recognize student accomplishment and provide faculty with tools and data to help foster quality education and leverage needed resources.  For this program to be successful, the participation of and feedback from members of the educational community is essential.  Members of the working group responsible for developing the bachelor's degree accreditation program will briefly describe the structure and rationale behind version 1.0 of the program, answer questions from the audience and receive community feedback. 


215.        TRAINING FOR A WORLD IN TRANSITION
Symposium
MON. 3:45 PM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 251
CHAIRED: P. J. KENNELLY 

3:45                        Chair’s introduction. 

3:50        215.1     Developing the nation’s human capital in STEM for tomorrow. D. A. Rockcliffe. Natl. Sci. Fndn. 

4:15                        A metabolic pathways diagnosis test for assessing the development of biochemistry students’ visualization skills. E. Galembeck, V.J.S.V. dos Santos and T. Anderson. UNICAMP, Campinas, Brazil, Purdue Univ. and Fed. Univ. of São João, Brazil. (838.5) 

4:30        215.2     Ramping up for STEM success: new models for transfer. S. Albertine. Assn. of Amer. Cols. And Univs., Washington, DC. 

4:55                        Developing a robust POGIL model to connect basic biochemistry to the physiological changes during starvation. D. Dean and E. Anderson. Univ. of Saint Joseph, CT. (613.3) 

5:10                        An inexplicable disease—prion disease as a ‘choose-your-own-experiment’ case to introduce students to scientific inquiry. J.K. Hines, A. Serrano and S. Miller. Lafayette Col., PA and Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison. (612.3) 

5:25        215.3     Educating students for an interdisciplinary world. L.A. Kuhn. Michigan State Univ. 

5:50                        Discussion and closing remarks. 


329.        PROMOTING CONCEPT-DRIVEN TEACHING STRATEGIES IN BMB THROUGH CONCEPT ASSESSMENTS
Symposium
TUE. 9:55 AM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 251
CHAIRED: E. BELL 

9:55                        Project update. E. Bell. Univ. of Richmond. 

10:05     329.1     Will this be on the test? Characterizing the cognitive levels of undergraduate biology courses. J. Momsen, L. Montplaisir and E. Anderson. North Dakota State Univ. 

10:30     329.2     Problem solving in biochemistry: assessment, learning strategies, and preconceptions. C.A. Sensibaugh and M.P. Osgood. Univ. of New Mexico. 

10:55     329.3     Biochemistry students’ misconceptions regarding enzyme-substrate interactions. K.J. Linenberger and S.L. Bretz. Iowa State Univ. and Miami Univ. 

11:20     329.4     Assessing student development of scientific thinking skills using the EDAT and ADAT: the experimental design and analysis of data ability tests. K. Sirum, A. Majorczyk and A. Andrews. Bowling Green State Univ. 

11:45                     Discussion. 

   

 

Graduate and Postdoctoral Events

Travel Award Keynote Lecture and Poster Session
Friday, April 19

Friday, April 19, 5:30 pm - 8:00 pm (Check in, 4:30 pm - 5:15 pm)
Boston Convention and Exhbitiion Center
Friday evening's events are exclusively for recipients of the ASBMB 2013 Graduate Minority and Graduate/Postdoctoral Travel Awards. All others are welcome to register for Saturday's Professional Development Program for Trainees (see below).

GRADUATE AND POSTDOCTORAL TRAVEL AWARD KEYNOTE LECTURE 

The wonderings of a biochemist
Jack E. Dixon, HHMI/UCSD

POSTER SESSION, PART I 

Following the keynote lecture, Graduate Minority and Graduate/Postdoctoral Travel Awardees will present their research to fellow recipients and network with peers. Poster Session, Part II is hosted on Saturday, April 20.  Awardees are required to attend both sessions. 

 

Professional Development Program for Trainees
Saturday, April 20

Saturday, April 20, 9:00 am - 5:00 pm, (Check in 8:30 am - 8:50 am)
Boston Convention and Exhbition Center

All graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and advisors, who have registered for this event in advance as part of the Experimental Biology meeting registration process, are welcome to attend Saturday's Professional Development Program for Trainees.  Event registration is provided for ASBMB Travel Award recipients only.  See below for event registration details. (**) 

CAREER OPTIONS: THE BENCH, THE BOARDROOM OR IN BETWEEN?
9:00 am - 12:15 pm

Individual presentations followed by a panel discussion and audience Q&A.  Presenters join attendees for lunch and continued discussion. 

Creating your individual development plan: A strategy for navigating your scientific career
Cynthia Fuhrmann, U. of Massachusetts Medical School

The sport of an academic science career
Sharon Cantor, U. of Massachusetts Medical School

Tobacco Regulatory Science and Research Priorities
Dana van Bemmel, Food and Drug Administration

Living the Dream: Research and Teaching with Undergraduates
John M. Schmitt, George Fox U.

Place for scientific broadening   
Irene Nunes, Merck Sharp & Dohme

Switching from pipette to pen: Careers in science journalism
Rajendrani (Raj) Mukhopadhyay, American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

NETWORKING LUNCHEON
12:15 pm - 1:30 pm

Invited presenters will join trainees for continued discussion of career interests and issues over lunch.

POSTER SESSION, PART II
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm
All are welcome at the afternoon poster session featuring Graduate and Postdoctoral Travel Awardee presentations.  Part I hosted on Friday, April 19.


WORKSHOPS
2:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Presented in the afternoon, pick the workshop that best targets your career stage, goals and insterests.

I. Pathway(s) to Your Own Lab: A Workshop for Postdoctoral Fellows
A no-holds barred question and answer session on becoming a PI of your own lab.  There is no single right answer to how this is done, but through shared experiences of the panel and audience members already starting the process, participants at any stage of their postdoc should find helpful hints to achieving success in academia.

Christopher D. Heinen, U. of Connecticut Health Center
Sharon Cantor, U. of Massachusetts Medical School
John M. Schmitt, George Fox U.

II. Taking the Industrial Route - Tips for Careers in Science Industry 
Panel discussion for graduate students and postdocs who are potentially interested in a career in industry.  This session is an opportunity to ask questions of those already in the field.  Find out if a career in industry may be right for you and what steps you can take now to prepare.

Irene Nunes, Merck
Melissa Starovasnik, Genentech, Inc.

III. Advice for Surviving Graduate School: A Workshop for Graduate Students
This session will help students navigate graduate school by providing information and advice on how to take the next step.  Tables will be set up on individual topics, and students are encouraged to ask specific question and get advice from the professionals.  Thirty-minute sessions will give participants the opportunity to explore multiple topics.

Grant writing and thesis preparation
Sandra K. Weller, U. of Connecticut Health Center

Interview skills
Timothy D. O’Connell, Sanford Health

Looking for a Postdoc
Michael S. Kapiloff, U. of Miami Miller School of Medicine

Mentoring advice
Kimberly Dodge-Kafka, U. of Connecticut Health Center

(**) EVENT REGISTRATION   

$25 for ASBMB members, includes lunch
$35 for all other EB registrants, includes lunch 

Event registration available when registering for the Experimental Biology (EB) meeting.  ASBMB Travel Award recipients do NOT have to register for this EVENT because event registration is part of the Graduate/Postdoctoral and Graduate Minority travel award.  Participation is mandatory for ASBMB Travel Award recipients.  Registration will close when event is fully subscribed.  No onsite registration.  

 

Undergraduate Events

 

Sceince Revoution 

 

Undergraduate Uprising at the ASBMB Annual Meeting 

To help enrich the undergraduate experience at the meeting, the ASBMB Education and Professional Development Committee (EPD), working with the Undergraduate Affiliate Network (UAN) Committee, has developed the following suite of programs with a historical theme! Have fun and enjoy the science!

Paul Revere’s Ride, The Biochemists are Coming! - an Annual Meeting Orientation for Undergraduates
Saturday, April 20, 11:30 am - Noon

Preparing for the ASBMB Annual Meeting can be a challenge, especially to undergraduate students who are attending a national meeting for the first time. The more prepared students are to engage in the science, the more they can gain from their annual meeting experiences. Join fellow undergraduates at the start of the meeting for a meeting orientation and Q&A session.

Intercontinental Congress 17th Annual Undergraduate Research Poster Competition
Saturday, April 20, 12:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Advance registration required. Undergraduate First Authors will receive an invitation in early January to participate in the competition. 

Declaration of Independence - Beyond College Workshop: Coping with Some Common Challenges
Saturday, April 20, 4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

ASBMB Boston Tea Parties - Undergraduate Breakfasts with Award Scientists 

Sunday, April 21, 2013, 7:00 am - 8:00 am - Helen M. Berman, Rutgers University, 2013 Delano Award for Computational Biosciences recipient.

Monday, April 22, 7:00 am - 8:00 am - Olke C. Uhlenbeck, Northwestern University, 2013 ASBMB Fritz Lipmann Lectureship Award recipient.

Advance registration required.  Register online at www.asbmb.org/breakfast.  Students will gather to meet award scientists for an open discussion and learn about their personal paths to a career in science.
 

Workshops

ASBMB 2013 Workshops 

Computational Tools for Assigning Enzymatic Functions Workshop:  Examples from the Glutathione Transferase Superfamily
This workshop is sponsored by the Enzyme Function Initiative (EFI), a Large Scale Collaborative Project from NIGMS (U54GM093342).
Sunday, April 21, 12:30-2:30 pm
Co-organizers: John A. Gerlt, Univ of Illinois and Patricia C. Babbitt, UCSF

The EFI is devising an integrated sequence/structure based strategy for predicting and assigning functions to “unknown” enzymes discovered in genome projects, a major challenge in genomic biology. To accomplish this goal, the EFI has brought together multidisciplinary expertise in bioinformatics, experimental structural biology, structural modeling/docking, and experimental enzymology to assign in vitro substrate specificities and enzymatic functions and, also, microbiology and metabolomics to validate predicted and experimentally confirmed in vitro enzymatic functions in an in vivo context.

A major focus of the EFI is dissemination of its strategy to the broader scientific community.  The purpose of this workshop is to encourage and identify potential collaborations between the EFI and the broader scientific community. This workshop will feature presentations describing the development and application of high throughput computational “tools” to facilitate functional assignment of unknown enzymes discovered in genome sequencing projects.  The glutathione transferase superfamily will be used to demonstrate:

1) The use of sequence similarity networks (SSNs) to visualize relationships among members of functionally diverse enzyme superfamilies, identify unknowns, and aid the identification of their functions.
2)  The use of Cytoscape to visualize SSNs that are available in the Structure Function Linkage Database http://sfld.rbvi.ucsf.edu/).
3)  The use of homology modeling and docking tools to predict substrate specificities.

The program for the workshop will include presentations from co-investigators in the EFI:

Overview of the Enzyme Function Initiative
John A. Gerlt, Univ of Illinois, Urbana Champaign

Sequence similarity networks to visualize and define “function space” in the glutathione transferase superfamily
Patricia C. Babbitt, UCSF

An atlas of the glutathione transferase superfamily
Richard N. Armstrong, Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Homology modeling and ligand docking to provide functional insights about “unknown” glutathione transferases
Andrej Sali, UCSF

These presentations will be followed by a question/answer session to identify potential collaborations with the EFI for the glutathione transferase superfamily as well as other functionally diverse superfamilies.

Proteomics of Post-translational Modifications Workshop
Tuesday, April 23, 2013, 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Session Chair Steven P. Gygi, Harvard Med Sch
Presentations followed by a panel discussion and audience questions.

Phosphorylation analysis by mass spectrometry
Steven P. Gygi, Harvard Med Sch

Wheat from Chaff: Finding Modifications That Matter Most
Neil Kelleher, Northwestern Univ

Chemical Proteomics of Cysteine Modifications
Brent Martin, Univ of Michigan 

 

Special Events

 

ASBMB Annual Meeting Special Events 

Events located in the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center, 415 Summer Street, unless otherwise noted.
 

Professional Development for Graduate/Postdoctoral Trainees
Saturday, April 20, Room 253C

Energize your career objectives with insider perspectives on career options, panel discussions that respond to your burning questions, and networking opportunities that will benefit you at the meeting and in the future.  Join us for this pre-meeting program that is sure to help you make the most of your "big" meeting experience in Boston. 
 Click for program details.

* Advance event registration required and will be accepted when registering for Experimental Biology (EB2013).   Registration includes lunch: $25 ASBMB Members, $35 all other EB registrants.  Event registration will close when fully subscribed. 
Event registration is included with the ASBMB Graduate/Postdoc and Graduate Minority Travel Awards, so event registration is not required for awardees.  However, travel award recipients must register for Experimental Biology (EB2013).

ASBMB Opening Reception
Saturday, April 20, Ballroom West, immediately follows the Opening Lecture

Kick start your meeting experience enjoying refreshments while connecting with friends and fellow attendees at the ASBMB Opening Reception.  The event immediately follows the Society's Opening Lecture.  Science Outreach Activity posters will be on display during the reception.  After the reception, explore Boston's waterfront nightlife, or take the T to Back Bay.  All ASBMB members, biochemistry nonmember attendees and guests welcome at the Opening Lecture and Reception.

A Science Revolution – Undergraduate Uprisings at the ASBMB Annual Meeting  

 To help enrich the undergraduate experience at the meeting, the ASBMB Education and Professional Development Committee (EPD), working with the Undergraduate Affiliate Network (UAN) Committee, has developed the following suite of programs with a historical theme!  Have fun and enjoy the science.

"Paul Revere’s Ride, The Biochemists are Coming!"  An Annual Meeting Orientation for Undergraduates
Saturday, April 20, 11:30 am - 12:00 noon, Room 50
Preparing for the ASBMB Annual Meeting can be a challenge, especially to undergraduate students who are attending a national meeting for the first time.  The more prepared students are to engage in the science, the more they can gain from their annual meeting experiences.   Join fellow undergraduates at the start of the meeting for a meeting orientation and Q&A session. 

"Continental Congress, The 17th Annual Undergraduate Research Poster Competition
Saturday, April 20, 1:00 pm - 4:30 pm, East Registration Area
Advance registration required.  Undergraduate First Authors will receive an invitation in January to participate in the competition.

"Declaration of Independence," Beyond College Workshop: Coping with Some Common Challenges
a workshop for undergraduates
Saturday, April 20, 4:45 pm - 5:45 pm, Room 50

"Boston Tea Parties, Undergraduate Breakfasts with Award Scientists
Sunday, April 21 and Monday, April 22, 7:00 am - 8:00 am, Room 255

Advance registration required.
Students will gather to meet award scientists for an open discussion and learn about their personal paths to a career in science.

Fostering Partnerships Between Colleges, University and K-12 Schools Workshop
 Advance Registration Required
Saturday, April 20, 9:00 am - 1:00 pm, Room 251

This workshop is designed for junior high and high school teachers and college/university faculty and researchers who are interested in forming collaborative partnerships to bring creative, cutting-edge, and hands-on science into K-12 classrooms.  

How Scientists Can Save the World
sponsored by the ASBMB Public Affairs Advisory Committee
Sunday, April 21, 12:45 - 2:30 pm, Room 258

Join the leading names in science and public policy as we discuss the massive challenges facing society in the next 100 years. Learn how science holds many of the solutions to problems like hunger, health, and sustainability - and how to be an advocate for science. 

Moderator:
Jeremy M. Berg, ASBMB President, Univ. of Pittsburgh
Panelists:
Tania Baker, MIT
Darlene Cavalier, Science Cheerleader
Craig Mello, Univ. of Massachusetts
 

ASBMB Welcome and Networking Reception
sponsored by the ASBMB Minority Affairs Committee
Sunday, April 21, 6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
This event will be held in the Westin Boston Waterfront Hotel, Commonwealth Ballroom

The ASBMB Minority Affairs Committee welcomes primary investigators, industry professionals, educators, young scientists and students to enjoy this networking and mentoring reception.   ASBMB members and biochemistry nonmembers welcome.  The reception will feature posters from this year's ASBMB Graduate Minority Travel Award recients.  Sign up now for ASBMB's Partnership for Diversity

Open Meeting on ASBMB Certification Program for Bachelor's Degree in Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Etc.
Monday, April 22, 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm, Room 251

ASBMB has initiated roll-out of an outcomes-based degree certification program for undergraduates majoring in Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and related majors. The objectives of the program are to recognize student accomplishment and provide faculty with tools and data to help foster quality education and leverage needed resources. For this program to be successful, the participation of and feedback from members of the educational community is essential. Members of the working group responsible for developing the bachelor's degree accreditation program will briefly describe the structure and rationale behind version 1.0 of the program, answer questions from the audience and receive community feedback.

From the Lab to the Kitchen Table, Communicating Science to a Lay Audience
Monday, April 22, 12:30 pm - 2:30 pm, Room 255

This interactive program features successful outreach activities and teaches attendees techniques for effectively communicating their science to the lay public.    Learn more and view the line-up of presenters.

ASBMB Thematic Fermentation Happy Hour
Monday, April 22, 6:00 pm, immediately follows the afternoon symposia outside ASBMB session rooms in the Northeast Foyer

Relax at this casual post-session happy hour and continue the scientific discussion, meet the speakers and network with others in your field - all while enjoying a beverage and light refreshments hosted by the ASBMB.  ASBMB members and biochemistry nonmember attendees welcome.

ASBMB Science Cafe: The New Social Networking Event
Monday, April 22, 7:00 pm
This event will be held in the Westin Boston Waterfront Hotel, Sauciety Restaurant

Y.E.S. Mixer (Young Experimental Scientists)
Monday, April 22, 9:00 pm - 11:00 pm
This event will be held at the Westin Boston Waterfront Hotel Galleria.

The Y.E.S. Mixer brings together trainees and students from all Experimental Biology disciplines for a fun, club-like, dance party. Meeting registration badge must be worn to gain admittance. Beverage tickets issued at the door, while supplies last. Alcohol will Not be served to those under 21 or those without proper ID.

Science Cafes 101: An Interactive Guide to Organizing Your Own Science Cafe
Tuesday, April 23, 12:30 pm - 2:30 pm, Room 255

After attending the ASBMB Science Cafe on Monday evening, the folks from Sciencecafes.org provide attendees with the resources already in place to make organizing a successful science cafe in your community easy and fun.

ASBMB Women Scientists Networking Event
Tuesday, April 23, 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm, Room 257B

Each year, the ASBMB sponsors a session where women scientists reflect on some aspect of their careers or general issues surrounding women’s participation in science. This year we will explore the challenges and transitions that women experience in the different stages of their scientific careers (early, mid, and late career).

 

 

 


SCIENTIFIC SESSIONS

Catalytic Mechanisms

Theme Organizers
Enrique De La Cruz, Yale Univ and
Catherine Drennan, MIT

98.          BIOENERGY
Symposium
SUN. 3:45 PM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 253C
CHAIRED: J. STUBBE 

3:45                        Chair’s introduction. 

3:50        98.1        Water oxidation chemistry of photosystem II. G. Brudvig. Yale Univ. 

4:15                        Mind the gap: long range charge transfer across the periplasm of Shewanella oneidensis. S.J. Elliott, M. Firer-Sherwood, N. Ando, K. Bewley, J.Y. Mock and C. Drennan. Boston Univ., MIT and HHMI, Cambridge, MA. (787.1) 

4:30        98.2        Biogenesis of the H-cluster of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase. J.B. Broderick, E.M. Shepard, B.R. Duffus, S. Ghose, N. Joshi, E.S. Boyd and J.W. Peters. Montana State Univ. 

4:55                        Develop spatially-interactive multienzyme complex on selfassembled DNA nanostructures. J. Fu. Biodesign at Arizona State Univ. (1002.4) 

5:10                        Kinetic and spectroscopic studies of bicupin oxalate oxidase and putative active site mutants. E.W. Moomaw, E. Hoffer, P. Moussatche, J. Salerno, M. Grant, B. Immelman, R. Uberto, A. Ozarowski and A. Angerhofer. Kennesaw State Univ., Univ. of Florida and Natl. High Magnetic Field Lab., Tallahassee. (789.9) 

5:25        98.3        Crystallographic snapshots of metalloenzyme complexes involved in biological carbon dioxide sequestration. C.L. Drennan, Y. Kung, N. Ando, T. Doukov, G. Bender and S.W. Ragsdale. MIT/HHMI, SSRL, Menlo Park and Univ. of Michigan. 

5:50                        Discussion and closing remarks. 


203.        CATALYTIC AND SUBSTRATE PROMISCUITY
Symposium
MON. 9:55 AM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 253C
CHAIRED: S. COPLEY 

9:55                        Chair’s introduction. 

10:00     203.1     Multiple catalytic promiscuity: specificity and efficiency in the alkaline phosphatase superfamily. F. Hollfelder. Univ. of Cambridge, U.K. 

10:25                     Substrate specificity of Rv0045c, a bacterial esterase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. C.P. Savas, A. Gehring, R.J. Johnson and G. Hoops. Butler Univ. (559.2) 

10:40     203.2     Enzyme recruitment and the evolution of new metabolic potential. B.G. Miller. Florida State Univ. 

11:05                     The role of modulator residues in PDZ domain binding interactions. J. Amacher, P.R. Cushing, L. Brooks, P. Boisguerin and D.R. Madden. Dartmouth Col. and Inst. of Med. Immunol., Berlin. (559.6) 

11:20                     Tracking GPCR promiscuity at the source: how receptor conformation is translated to differential function. S. Sivaramakrishnan and R.U. Malik. Univ. of Michigan. (559.5) 

11:35     203.3     The remarkable pliability and promiscuity of specialized metabolism. J.P. Noel. Salk Inst./HHMI. 

12:00                     Discussion and closing remarks. 


337.        COOL CATALYSIS AND RADICALLY NEW REACTION MECHANISMS
Symposium
TUE. 3:45 PM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 253C
CHAIRED: J. BRODERICK 

3:45                        Chair’s introduction. 

3:50        337.1     Novel enzymatic transformations in secondary metabolism and tRNA modification. V. Bandarian. Univ. of Arizona. 

4:15                        Completing our understanding of tetracycline biosynthesis: the enzymatic basis of the F420-dependent final reduction step. Y. Tang and P. Wang. UCLA. (788.1) 

4:30        337.2     Investigating roles of reader domains in regulating activity of jumonji histone demethylases. D.G. Fujimori. UCSF. 

4:55                        Nitrile-synthetic enzyme involved in the formation of a carbon-nitrogen triple bond. M. Kobayashi, J. Nomura and Y. Hashimoto. Grad. Sch. of Life & Envrn. Sci., Univ. of Tsukuba, Japan. (788.2) 

5:10                        Kinetic mechanism of human DNA ligase I. P.J. O’Brien. Univ. of Michigan Med. Sch. (998.7) 

5:25        337.3     Radicals: your life is in their hands. J. Stubbe. MIT. 

5:50                        Discussion and closing remarks. 


454.        MOLECULAR MOTOR PROTEINS—FORCE AND WORK AS PRODUCTS
Symposium
WED. 9:55 AM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 253C
CHAIRED: E. M. DE LA CRUZ 

9:55                        Chair’s introduction. 

10:00     454.1     ATP utilization by DExD/H-box RNA helicases – molecular motor proteins that couple ATPase activity with RNA rearrangement. E.M. De La Cruz. Yale Univ. 

10:25                    Can a b/delta fusion protein replace individual b and delta subunits of ATP synthase in Escherichia coli? C.S. Gajadeera and J. Weber. Texas Tech Univ. and Texas Tech Univ. Hlth. Sci. Ctr. (1001.2) 

10:40     454.2     Kinesins – how the ATPase cycle modulates function. S.P. Gilbert. Rensselaer Polytech Inst. 

11:05                     Plasticity of the kinesin-microtubule interaction is encoded by the motor domain beta-sheet. J. Richard, E. Kim, E. Wojcik and S. Kim. LSU Hlth. Sci. Ctr., New Orleans. (999.1) 

11:20                     Regulation of assembly of bipolar myosin II filaments. A. Kandel, R. Frei and K. Prehoda. Univ. of Florida and Univ. of Oregon. (1004.3) 

11:35     454.3     From force-sensing to power generation – how force modulates the ATPase kinetics of myosin motors. E.M. Ostap, M.J. Greenberg, J.M. Laakso, Y.E. Goldman and H. Shuman. Univ. of Pennsylvania. 

12:00                     Discussion and closing remarks. 

   


 

Chemical and Systems Biology

Theme Organizers
Shelley D. Copley, Univ of Colorado, Boulder and
Anna K. Mapp, Univ of Michigan

87.          FUNCTION AND EVOLUTION OF METABOLIC NETWORKS
Symposium
SUN. 9:55 AM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 253C
CHAIRED: TBA 

9:55                        Chair’s introduction.

10:00     87.1        How do microbes control their metabolic operation. U. Sauer. ETH Zurich.

10:25                     Human melanoma metabolic network analysis with combined ,13C NMR/bioreactor technique: testing the Warburg effect. A. Shestov, A. Mancuso, J.W. Locasale and J.D. Glickson. Cornell Univ. and Univ. of Pennsylvania. (798.1)

10:40     87.2        Reconstruction and evolution of metabolic networks across a phylogenetic tree. D. Vitkup. Columbia Univ.

11:05                     Metabolic disorder in a mouse model on an American diet: proteomic analysis of cardiovascular disease. S.A. Whelan, M.E. Mccomb, J.L. Spencer, C.F. Heckendorf, M.M. Bachschmid, D.A. Siwik, W. Colucci, R.A. Cohen and C.E. Costello. Boston Univ. Sch. of Med. (794.17)

11:20                     Spatial reorganization of yeast moonlighting protein, enolase, in hypoxia to alter carbon metabolism. N. Miura, M. Shinohara, Y. Tatsukami, H. Morisaka, K. Kuroda and M. Ueda. Kyoto Univ. (791.2)

11:35     87.3        Promiscuous enzymes and serendipitous metabolic pathways. S.D. Copley and J. Kim. Univ. of Colorado Boulder.

12:00                     Discussion and closing remarks.


213.        CONTROLLING CELLULAR COMMUNICATION
Symposium
MON. 3:45 PM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 253C
CHAIRED: A. MAPP 

3:45                        Chair’s introduction.

3:50        213.1     Disrupting bacterial communication to suppress multidrug resistant phenotypes. C. Melander. North Carolina State Univ.

4:15                        Structure activity relationship study of the cleistriosides and cleistetrosides for antibacterial/anticancer activity. P. Shi. Northeastern Univ. (1014.7)

4:30        213.2     Small molecules, toxins and cell death pathways. D.T. Hung. Harvard Med. Sch./Broad Inst./Massachusetts Gen. Hosp.

4:55                        Single clone expression cloning and protein microarray platforms for novel extracellular receptor-ligand identification. I. Tom, G. Quinones, A. Estevez, M. Paluch, K. Bowman, Y. Franke, K. Billeci, P. Hass, J. Tang, N. Lewin-Koh, D. Eaton, J-P. Stephan and L. Gonzalez. Genentech. (803.5)

5:10                        A small optogenetic tool for spatiotemporal control of intracellular cAMP. C.P. O’Banion and D.S. Lawrence. Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. (566.1)

5:25        213.3     Signals from the surface to control cell fate decisions. L.L. Kiessling. Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison.

5:50                        Discussion and closing remarks.


327.        MANIPULATING METABOLIC NETWORKS
Symposium
TUE. 9:55 AM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 253C
CHAIRED: S. COPLEY 

9:55                        Chair’s introduction.

10:00     327.1     Towards a comprehensive understanding of cellular metabolism. J. Rabinowitz, Y. Xu, M.F. Clasquin, S. Johnson, W. Lu, S.R. Campagna, A.F. Yakunin, A.A. Caudy and F. Letisse. Princeton Univ., Agios Pharmaceut., Cambridge, MA, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, Univ. of Toronto and Univ. of Toulouse.

10:25                     Chemical biology analysis of borrelidin identifies an essential translational enzyme as a pro-angiogenic modulator of tumor progression in multiple human cancers. C.S. Francklyn, K. Lounsbury, T. Williams and A. Mirando. Univ. of Vermont. (805.7)

10:40     327.2     Exploiting the synthetic capacity of microbes for the production of novel value-added biochemicals. K.L. Prather. MIT.

11:05                     Thiol-based antioxidants trigger transient mitochondrial oxidation. J.N. Beaudoin, V.L. Kolossov, W. Hanafin, S. DiLiberto, Jr., P.G. Kenis and H.R. Gaskins. Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. (1011.14)

11:20                     Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mitoTEMPO inhibits glycolysis and induces melanoma cell death by blocking ROS-sensitive survival and metabolic pathways. R.R. Nazarewicz, A.E. Dikalova, A.T. Bikineyeva, S.V. Ivanov and S.I. Dikalov. Vanderbilt Univ. Med. Ctr. and Yale Cancer Ctr. (793.7)

11:35     327.3     Metabolic pathway analysis in cancer. R.J. DeBerardinis. Univ. of Texas Southwestern Med. Ctr.

12:00                     Discussion and closing remarks.


459.        ASSEMBLY AND CONTROL OF DYNAMIC PROTEIN COMPLEXES
Symposium
WED. 1:45 PM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 253C
CHAIRED: D. HUNG 

1:45                        Chair’s introduction.

1:50        459.1     Dynamic complexes of intrinsically disordered proteins and their regulation by post-translational modifications. J.D. Forman-Kay. Hosp. for Sick Children and Univ. of Toronto.

2:15                        Structure-based drug design of inhibitors of the CD23 and immunoglobulin E interaction. M.O.Y. Pang, J. McDonnell and A. Beavil. King’s Col. London. (1015.7)

2:30        459.2     Capturing transient transcriptional activator-coactivator complexes with large and small molecules. A.K. Mapp. Univ. of Michigan.

2:55                        Characterization of a novel interaction between BLIP-II and Staphylococcus aureus PBP2a. C.J. Adamski, D-C. Chow, N. Brown and T. Palzkill. Baylor Col. of Med. (1013.2)

3:10                        Crosslinking mass spectrometry with novel aryl-dialdehyde reagents reveal extended conformational dynamics of RNA polymeraseII. M.J. Trnka and A.L. Burlingame. UCSF. (797.4)

3:25        459.3     Functional interactions of intrinsically disordered proteins in signaling networks. P.E. Wright. The Scripps Res. Inst.

3:50                        Discussion and closing remarks.

  


 

Genome Replication and Repair

Theme Organizers
Stephen Bell, MIT and
Lei Li, MD Anderson Cancer Ctr

95. COORDINATING FUNCTIONS AT THE REPLICATION FORK
Symposium
SUN. 3:45 PM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 252AB
CHAIRED: S. BELL

3:45  Chair’s introduction.

3:50 95.1 Pif1 helicases: helping replication forks maneuver past replication barriers. M.L. Bochman, K. Paeschke, P. Garcia and V.A. Zakian. Princeton Univ.

4:15 Interplay of DNA polymerase lambda, protection of telomeres 1 and TERRA in telomere elongation. G. Maga, J. Lingner and U. Hübscher. Inst. of Molec. Genet., CNR, Pavia, Fed. Polytech. Sch. of Lausanne and Univ. of Zürich-Irchel. (538.4)

4:30 95.2 Chromatin replication and epigenome maintenance. C. Alabert and A. Groth. Univ. of Copenhagen.

4:55  Coordinated degradation of replisome components ensures genome stability upon replication stress. E. Noguchi, L. Roseaurlin and T. Toda. Drexel Univ. Col. of Med. and Cancer Res. UK, London. (968.4)

5:10  Probing the nucleic acid binding modes of the single-stranded DNA binding protein of the bacteriophage T4 replication complex. D. Jose, S.E. Weitzel and P.H. von Hippel. Inst. of Molec. Biol., Eugene, OR. (541.2)

5:25 95.3 Mechanism of replication-coupled DNA interstrand cross-link repair. J. Walter. Harvard Med. Sch.

5:50  Discussion and closing remarks.

200. MECHANISMS AND CONTROL OF REPLICATION INITIATION
Symposium
MON. 9:55 AM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 252AB
CHAIRED: V. ZAKIAN

9:55  Chair’s introduction.

10:00 200.1 Forkhead (Fox) transcription factors open a new dimension in understanding the epigenetic control of replication origins in S. cerevisiae. O. Aparicio, S.R.V. Knott, Z.A. Ostrow, J.M. Peace, Y. Gan, R. Kalhor, L. Chen and S. Tavaré. Univ. of Southern California.

10:25  Mapping DNA replication origins in the human genome. S.A. Gerbi, J. Urban and M. Foulk. Brown Univ. (759.1)

10:40 200.2 Controlling genome integrity via posttranslational regulation of the eukaryotic replisome. K. Labib. Univ. of Manchester.

11:05  Modulation of Mcm2-7 activity by Cdt1. L.F. DaSilva, T. Kolaczyk, X. Ma and M.J. Davey. Univ. of Western Ontario. (539.2)

11:20  Functional characterization of Dbf4 interactions with DNA replication and checkpoint factors. D.R. Jones, L.A. Matthews, B.J. McConkey, A. Guarné and B.P. Duncker. Univ. of Waterloo and McMaster Univ., Canada. (542.10)

11:35 200.3 Mechanism of eukaryotic helicase loading and activation. S.P. Bell, S. Kang, S. Ticau and B.S.H. Chan. MIT/HHMI.

12:00  Discussion and closing remarks.

334. ACTIVATION OF DNA DAMAGE SIGNALING
Symposium
TUE. 3:45 PM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 252AB
CHAIRED: L. LI

3:45  Chair’s introduction.

3:50 334.1 Holliday junction resolvases: the good, the bad and the ugly. S. West. London Res. Inst., South Mimms, U.K.

4:15 The DNA damage checkpoint triggers autophagy to regulate the initiation of anaphase. V.V. Eapen, F.J. Dotiwala, J.C. Harrison, A.A. Eden, V. Ranade, S. Yoshida and J.E. Haber. Brandeis Univ. (545.2)

4:30 334.2 Sensing of DNA breaks by the ATM and ATR checkpoint kinases. L. Zou. Massachusetts Gen. Hosp. Cancer Ctr., Harvard Med. Sch.

4:55  Stimulation of the BLM-hDNA2 pathway of DNA double-strand break end resection by TopoIIIα/RMI1/RMI2. J.M. Daley, X. Xue, T. Chiba and P. Sung. Yale Univ. Sch. of Medicne. (760.1)

5:10  Herpes simplex virus type 1 replication proteins disable ATR signaling by binding to substrates that would normally recruit 9-1-1 and topBP1 to activate ATRr. S.K. Weller and K.N. Mohni. Univ. of Connecticut Hlth. Ctr. (757.1)

5:25 334.3 Regulatory ubiquitylation during the response to DNA double-strand breaks. D. Durocher. Mount Sinai Hosp., Toronto.

5:50 Discussion and closing remarks.

451. MECHANISMS OF GENOMIC STABILITY
Symposium
WED. 9:55 AM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 252AB
CHAIRED: K. J. PATEL

9:55  Chair’s introduction.

10:00 451.1 Genetic approaches to cancer. S. Elledge, N. Pavlova, T. Davoli and N. Solimini. Harvard Med. Sch.

10:25  Single molecular analysis of the encounter of replication forks with DNA interstrand crosslinks. J. Huang, S. Liu, Y. Wang, A.K. Thazhathveetil, W. Wang and M.M. Seidman. NIA, NIH, Baltimore, Univ. of California, Riverside and Northwestern Univ. (538.2)

10:40 451.2 Toxic metabolism and DNA repair and hematopoesis. K. Patel. MRC Lab. of Molec. Biol., Cambridge, U.K.

11:05  Damaged DNA induced UV-damaged DNA-binding protein dimerization and its roles in chromatinized DNA repair. J.I. Yeh, A.S. Levine and S. Du. Univ. of Pittsburgh Sch. of Med. (758.13)

11:20  DNA repair choice defines a common pathway for recruitment of chromatin regulators. G. Bennett, M. Papamichos-Chronakis and C. Peterson. Univ. of Massachusetts Med. Sch. and UMR218, Inst. Curie, Paris. (760.2)

11:35 451.3 Functional divergence of Fanconi anemia genes. Y. Wang, J.W. Leung, Y. Jiang, M.G. Lowery, H.G. Do, K.M. Vasquez, J. Chen, W. Wang and L. Li. MD Anderson Cancer Ctr., Houston and Smithville and NIA, NIH, Baltimore.

12:00  Discussion and closing remarks.

Glycan Regulation of Signaling Pathways

Theme Organizers
Pamela Stanley, Albert Einstein Col of Med and
Lance Wells, Univ of Georgia

85.         O-MANNOSE GLYCANS AND MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY
Symposium 
SUN. 9:55 AM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 253A 
CHAIRED: P. STANLEY 

9:55                      Chair’s introduction. 

10:00     85.1       Molecular basis for dystroglycan binding to laminin-G domain-containing ligands. K.P. Campbell, T. Yoshida-Moriguchi, Y. Hara and K-i. Inamori. Univ. of Iowa/HHMI. 

10:25                    The C-mannosyltransferase. H. Bakker, F.F.R. Buettner and A. Ashikov. Hannover Med. Sch., Germany. (824.2) 

10:40     85.2       The mammalian O-mannosylation pathway: protein substrates, enzymes, and structures. L. Wells, S. Stalnaker, C. Dobson, R. Stuart and J. Praissman. Univ. of Georgia. 

11:05                    Conformational consequences of O-GalNAc and O-Man protein modifications: implications for the structural role of O-GalNAc in the mucin-like region of alpha-dystroglycan. D. Live, L. Foley and A. Borgert. Univ. of Georgia and Gundersen Lutheran Med. Fndn., La Crosse, WI. (823.1) 

11:20                    Does the phosphomannomutase pmm1 functionally compensate for decreased pmm2 expression in a zebrafish model for PMM2-CDG? R.A. Steet, A. Cline, N. Gao, H. Flanagan-Steet and M. Lehrman. Univ. of Georgia and Univ. of Texas Southwestern Med. Ctr. (830.1) 

11:35     85.3       The role of protein O-mannosylation during mouse development. S. Strahl, M. Lommel, T. Willer, M.R. Schneider, M. Dahlhoff and E. Wolf. Univ. of Heidelberg, HHMI/Univ. of Iowa and Ludwig Maximilian Univ. Munich. 

12:00                    Discussion and closing remarks. 

 


211.       GLYCOSYLTRANSFERASES THAT CONTROL CELL GROWTH AND DIFFERENTIATION
Symposium 
MON. 3:45 PM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 253A 
CHAIRED: L. WELLS 

3:45                      Chair’s introduction. 

 

3:50       211.1     Molecular regulation of protein O-glycosylation and relevance to disease and development. R.D. Cummings, Y. Wang and T. Ju. Emory Univ. Sch. of Med. 

4:15                      ST6Gal-i-mediated sialylation of Fas and TNFR1 controls receptor localization and apoptotic signaling. M.J. Schultz, A.F. Swindall, Z. Liu and S.L. Bellis. Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham. (592.3) 

4:30       211.2     Roles for glycans in mammalian development and spermatogenesis. P. Stanley, F. Batista and H-H. Huang. Albert Einstein Col. of Med. 

4:55                      A regulator of complex and hybrid N-glycan synthesis expressed mainly in testis. F. Batista, H-H. Huang and P. Stanley. Albert Einstein Col. of Med. (824.1) 

5:10                      The sialyltransferase, ST3Gal4, protects against pressure-induced cardiac hypertrophy. E.S. Bennett, W. Deng and J. Qi. Univ. of South Florida Morsani Col. of Med. (595.2) 

5:25       211.3     Homeostatic control of cell growth and differentiation by Golgi proofreading. M. Demetriou and H. Mkhikian. Univ. of California, Irvine. 

5:50                      Discussion and closing remarks. 

 


335.       ROLES FOR GLYCANS IN NOTCH SIGNALING
Symposium 
TUE. 3:45 PM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 253A 
CHAIRED: L. HSIEH-WILSON 

3:45                      Chair’s introduction. 

 

3:50       335.1     Glycan-dependent control of myelopoiesis. J. Lowe, D. Yao, B. Petryniak, J. Shim, P. Stanley and L. Zhou. Genentech Inc., Case Western Reserve Univ. and Albert Einstein Col. of Med. 

4:15                      TDX, a galectin-1 and galectin-3- specific inhibitor, mitigates VEGF-A-induced angiogenesis. W-S. Chen, H. Leffler, U.J. Nilsson and N. Panjwani. Tufts Univ. and Univ. of Lund, Sweden. (828.1) 

4:30       335.2     Post-transcriptional regulation of lunatic fringe provides a critical mechanism to control Notch pathway signaling during somitogenesis. S.E. Cole, M.F. Riley, D.R. Williams and E.T. Shifley. The Ohio State Univ. 

4:55                      A defined glycosaminoglycan-binding surface facilitates endoderm differentiation of human embryonic stem cells. B.A. Hernandez, P.J. Wrighton, J.R. Klim and L.L. Kiessling. Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison. (594.5) 

5:10                      Truncated O-glycans enhance tumorigenicity of pancreatic tumors. P. Radhakrishnan, J.A. Grunkemeyer, H. Clausen and M.A. Hollingsworth. Univ. of Nebraska Med. Ctr. and Panum Inst., Univ. of Copenhagen. (592.7) 

5:25       335.3     Site-specific analysis of O-fucose and O-glucose glycans on Notch. R.S. Haltiwanger, N. Rana, S. Kakuda, G-R. Hwang, E. Tan and H. Takeuchi. Stony Brook Univ. 

5:50                      Discussion and closing remarks. 

 


452.       REGULATION OF GENE EXPRESSION BY O-GLCNAC
Symposium
WED. 9:55 AM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 253A 
CHAIRED: R. HALTIWANGER  

9:55       452.1     Chair’s introduction. 

 

10:00     452.2     O-GlcNAc signaling regulates cancer metabolism. L. Hsieh-Wilson. Caltech. 

10:25                    Identification of osteoblast proteins O-GlcNAc modified during osteogenesis. A.K. Nagel, M. Schilling, M. Berkaw and L.E. Ball. Med. Univ. of South Carolina. (827.1) 

10:40     452.3     Hyper-O-GLcNAcation links cancer metabolism to oncogenic signaling. K. Vosseller and Z. Ma. Drexel Univ. Col. of Med. 

11:05                    Hyaluronan synthesis is regulated by intracellular O-GlcNAcylationof HAS 2. A. Passi, S. Deleonibus, D. Vigetti, M. Viola, E. Karousou and G. De Luca. Univ. of Insubria, Italy. (829.6) 

11:20                    O-GlcNAcylation of nuclear proteins in the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. N.C. Silmon de Monerri, F-Y. Che, M. Calloway, E. Nieves, S.C. Nardelli, R.H. Angeletti, L.M. Weiss, P. Wu and K. Kim. Albert Einstein Col. of Med. (826.1) 

11:35     452.4     Structural insights into O-GlcNAc transferase. S. Walker. Harvard Med. Sch. 

12:00                     Discussion and closing remarks. 

 

Lipids and Membranes

Theme Organizers
Tobias Baumgart, Univ of Pennsylvania and
Marion Sewer, UCSD

97.          LIPID SIGNALING IN HEALTH AND DISEASE
Symposium
(Supported by an educational grant from Avanti Polar Lipids, Inc.)
SUN. 3:45 PM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 254AB 
CHAIRED: R. COLEMAN

3:45                        Chair’s introduction. 

3:50        97.1        PtdIns(4)P, the Golgi, and cancer. S.J. Field. UCSD. 

4:15                        Casein kinase II phosphorylation of yeast Pah1p phosphatidate phosphatase. L-S. Hsieh and G.M. Carman. Rutgers Univ. (822.6) 

4:30        97.2        Regulation of glucocorticoid production by nuclear lipid metabolism. M.B. Sewer. UCSD. 

4:55                        Sphingosine kinase 1 is regulated by PPARα in response to free fatty acids and mediates skeletal muscle IL-6 production and signaling in diet-induced obesity. J.S. Ross, W. Hu, B. Rosen, A.J. Snider, L.M. Obeid and L.A. Cowart. Med. Univ. of South Carolina, Boston Univ. Sch. of Med., Ralph H Johnson VA Ctr., Charleston, Stony Brook Univ. and Northport VA Ctr., NY. (813.18) 

5:10                        Rescue of sphingosine kinase-1-knockout phenotype by 2-acetyl-5-tetrahydroxybutyl imidazole following murine cardiac arrest is linked to changes in sphingosine-1-phosphate and behenoylceramide levels. E.V. Berdyshev, I.A. Gorshkova, V. Natarajan, H. Wang, D.G. Beiser and T.L. Vanden Hoek. Univ. of Illinois at Chicago and Univ. of Chicago. (813.17) 

5:25        97.3        Sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling in inflammation and cancer. T. Kordula. Virginia Commonwealth Univ. Sch. of Med. 

5:50                        Discussion and closing remarks. 


202.        LIPID MEMBRANE CURVATURE IN MEMBRANE FUNCTION
Symposium
(Supported by an educational grant from Avanti Polar Lipids, Inc.)
MON. 9:55 AM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 254AB
CHAIRED: J. LIPPINCOTT-SCHWARTZ 

9:55                        Chair’s introduction. 

10:00     202.1     Spatiotemporal control of endocytosis by phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate. V. Haucke and Y. Posor. Leibniz Inst. for Molec. Pharmacol., Berlin. 

10:25                     Investigating the molecular basis of cPLA2α membrane bending. K.E. Ward, J.P. Ropa and R.V. Stahelin. Univ. of Notre Dame and Indiana Univ. Sch. of Med. at South Bend. (587.3) 

10:40     202.2     Separation of time-scales in the functional biophysics of bar domain proteins. T. Baumgart. Univ. of Pennsylvania. 

11:05                     Novel role of cytohesin-2 in regulation of macropinocytosis pathway and cell proliferation. V. Marshansky, H. Hosokawa, Z. Zhuang, P.A. Randazzo, G. Grüber and D.A. Ausiello. Massachusetts Gen. Hosp., Harvard Med. Sch., NCI, NIH and Nanyang Tech. Univ., Singapore. (591.8) 

11:20                     The Coffin-Lowry syndrome-associated protein RSK2 regulates neurite outgrowth through phosphorylation of PLD1 and synthesis of phosphatidic acid, a membrane curving fusogenic lipid. N. Vitale, M.R. Ammar and M-F. Bader. CNRS UPR-3212, Strasbourg. (587.1) 

11:35     202.3     Exocytic and endocytic mechanisms: discovering a role for membrane curvature and curvature stress. H.T. McMahon. MRC Lab. of Molec. Biol., Cambridge, U.K. 

12:00                     Discussion and closing remarks. 


336.        LIPID TRAFFICKING AND SORTING
Symposium
(Supported by an educational grant from Avanti Polar Lipids, Inc.)
TUE. 3:45 PM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 254AB
CHAIRED: T. BAUMGART 

This symposium features the Walter A. Shaw Young Investigator in Lipids Award lecture.  

3:45                        Chair’s introduction. 

3:50                        Introductory remarks. P. Espenshade. 

3:55                        Cell biology of neutral lipid storage. T. Walther. Yale Med. Sch. (333.1) 

4:25        336.1     The role of lipid transfer proteins in membrane trafficking and signal transduction. S. Lev, S. Kim, A. Kedan, M. Selitrennik and O. Keinan. Weizmann Inst. of Sci., Israel. 

4:50        336.2     Molecular dynamics of endomembrane structure and function. J.A. Lippincott-Schwartz. NICHD, NIH. 

5:15                        α-TTP-expressing astrocytes regulate α-tocopherol homeostasis in the CNS. L.M. Ulatowski, J. Atkinson and D. Manor. Case Western Reserve Univ. and Brock Univ., Canada. (814.2) 

5:30        336.3     Endocytic membrane traffic and cell signaling. M. von Zastrow, P. Temkin, A. Henry and R. Irannejad. UCSF and Stanford Univ. 

5:55                        Discussion and closing remarks. 


453.        LIPIDS IN NUTRIENT METABOLISM AND METABOLIC DYSFUNCTION
Symposium
(Supported by an educational grant from Avanti Polar Lipids, Inc.)
WED. 9:55 AM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 254AB
CHAIRED: M. SEWER 

9:55                        Chair’s introduction. 

10:00                     Speaker tba

10:25                     Fatty acids and their thioester derivatives as potential endogenous ligands of LXRα. G.V. Hines, A. Kaliappan, S.D. Rider, Jr. and H.A. Hostetler. Boonshoft Sch. of Med., Wright State Univ. (1021.2) 

10:40     453.2     Dietary fat composition modifies cell sphingolipid biosynthesis to mediate the consequences of obesity. L.A. Cowart. Med. Univ. of South Carolina and Ralph H. Johnson VA Med. Ctr. 

11:05                     Vitamin E and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. V. Thakur, L. Ulatowski, R. Parker, R. Zhang, X. Liu and D. Manor. Case Western Reserve Univ., Cornell Univ. and Cleveland Clin. Fndn. (1017.11) 

11:20                     Modulating lipid fate controls lipotoxicity in palmitate-treated hepatic cells. A. Leamy, M. Shiota and J. Young. Vanderbilt Univ. (1022.1) 

11:35     453.3     Glycerolipid intermediates alter insulin signaling. R. Coleman, C. Zhang, D.E. Cooper, J. Iping, J. Eaton, E. Klett and T.E. Harris. Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Univ. of Virginia. 

12:00                     Discussion and closing remarks. 

    


 
 

Mechanisms of Gene Transcription and Regulation

Theme Organizers
Stephen Buratowski, Harvard Med Sch and
Geeta Narlikar, UCSF

84.          CHROMATIN REMODELING DURING TRANSCRIPTION
Symposium
SUN. 9:55 AM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 252AB
CHAIRED: G. NARLIKAR 

9:55                        Chair’s introduction. 

10:00     84.1        Regulation of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling. B. Cairns and C. Clapier. HHMI, Huntsman Cancer Inst., Univ. of Utah. 

10:25                     Mediator affects Pol II recruitment and nucleosome displacement at heat shock protein genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Y. Moustafa and D.S. Gross. LSU Hlth. Sci. Ctr., Shreveport. (769.9) 

10:40     84.2        Chromatin assembly and disassembly. J. Tyler. MD Anderson Cancer Ctr. 

11:05                     A histone acetylation switch regulates H2A.Z deposition by the SWR-C remodeling enzyme. S. Watanabe and C. Peterson. Univ. of Massachusetts Med. Sch. (770.4) 

11:20                    Molecular basis of histone acetyllysine recognition by the BRPF1 bromodomain. K.C. Glass, A. Poplawski, K. Hu, W. Lee, D. Peng, S. Carlson, X. Shi and M. Westler. Albany Col. of Pharm. and Hlth. Sci., Colchester, VT, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison and Univ. of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Ctr. (770.3) 

11:35     84.3        Regulation and specificity of the Chd1 chromatin remodeler. G. Bowman, A. Patel, S. Chakravarthy and I. Nodelman. Johns Hopkins Univ. and Argonne Natl. Lab., Lemont, IL. 

12:00                     Discussion and closing remarks. 


210.        TRANSCRIPTION MECHANISMS
Symposium
MON. 3:45 PM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 252A/B
CHAIRED: R. KINGSTON 

3:45                        Chair’s introduction. 

3:50        210.1     Post-initiation roles for the sigma subunit of bacterial RNA polymerase. A. Hochschild, P. Deighan, N. Nair, K. Berry, S. Goldman and B. Nickels. Harvard Med. Sch. and Rutgers Univ., Piscataway. 

4:15                        The X-ray crystal structure of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase 70 holoenzyme. K. Murakami. Penn State. (547.2) 

4:30        210.2     Proteomic analysis of Pol II preinitiation complexes: the roles of mediator and saga. M. Carey. UCLA. 

4:55                        Capturing the transient, in vivo binding partners of transcriptional activators using a genetically incorporated photo-crosslinking amino acid. A. Dugan and A.K. Mapp. Univ. of Michigan. (550.15) 

5:10                        Characterization of the interaction between Rrn3 and rpa43: identification of a peptide that inhibits rDNA transcription and cell growth. L. Rothblum, Y. Penrod and K. Rothblum. Univ. of Oklahoma Hlth. Sci. Ctr. (549.3) 

5:25        210.3     Analysis of RNA polymerase II transcription initiation and elongation complexes. S. Buratowski. Harvard Med. Sch. 

5:50                        Discussion and closing remarks. 


324.        CO-TRANSCRIPTIONAL COUPLING MECHANISMS
Symposium
TUE. 9:55 AM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 252AB
CHAIRED: S. BURATOWSKI 

9:55                        Chair’s introduction. 

10:00     324.1     Regulating CTD-interactions by Ess1-dependent prolyl isomerization. S. Hanes, D. Atencio and C. Barnes. SUNY Upstate Med. Univ. 

10:25                     Argonaute 2-loaded promoter-targeted double stranded RNA mediates gene activation by interacting with the core transcriptional machinery. V. Portnoy and L-C. Li. UCSF. (547.6) 

10:40     324.2     Structural and functional studies of mRNA processing and quality control. L. Tong. Columbia Univ. 

11:05                     Comprehensive characterization of posttranslational modifications of histones using a novel high-throughput middle-down proteomics approach. S. Hess, A. Kalli, A. Moradian and M.J. Sweredoski. Caltech. (772.5) 

11:20                     Replication and transcription of SV40 direct distinct epigenetic signaling. B. Milavetz, L. Kallestad, A. Gefroh, E. Woods and K. Christensen. Univ. of North Dakota. (981.8) 

11:35     324.3     The role of the Paf1 complex in controlling transcription-coupled histone modifications. K.M. Arndt, A.S. Piro, M.K. Mayekar, B.N. Tomson, A.D. Wier, A.P. VanDemark, L.E. Heisler, M. Gebbia and C. Nislow. Univ. of Pittsburgh and Univ. of Toronto. 

12:00                     Discussion and closing remarks. 


456.        REPRESSIVE CHROMATIN
Symposium
WED. 1:45 PM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 252AB
CHAIRED: J. TYLER 

1:45                        Chair’s introduction. 

1:50        456.1     Higher-order chromatin folding and gene regulation. W. Bickmore. Inst. of Genet. and Molec. Med., Edinburgh, U.K. 

2:15                        Cohesin-dependent association of tRNA genes with nuclear pore complexes in budding yeast. M. Chen and M.R. Gartenberg. UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Med. Sch. (978.2) 

2:30        456.2     Epigenetic mechanism: silent nucleosomal structures and non-coding RNAs. R.E. Kingston, K-J. Armache, M.D. Simon, J. West, D. Grau, J. Garlick and C. Davis. Massachusetts Gen. Hosp. and Harvard Med. Sch. 

2:55                        MeCP2’s role in chromatin structure and stability. C. Riedmann and Y. Fondufe-Mittendorf. Univ. of Kentucky. (770.1) 

3:10                        Characterization of lysine-specific demethylase 1 as a potential olfactory receptor regulator. A.L. Savarino, S. Kilinc and R. Lane. Wesleyan Univ. (980.7) 

3:25        456.3     Mechanistic analysis of HP1 heterochromatin assembly. G. Narlikar, D. Canzio, M. Liao, N. Naber, E. Pate, A. Larson, S. Wu, R. Cooke, P. Schuck and Y. Cheng. UCSF and NIBIB, NIH. 

3:50                        Discussion and closing remarks. 

   

 

Mechanisms of Signal Transduction

Theme Organizers
Kun-Liang Guan, UCSD and Carol Lange, Univ of Minnesota Masonic Cancer Ctr

 99.         MECHANISMS OF CELL GROWTH AND AUTOPHAGY REGULATION
Symposium
SUN. 3:45 PM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 253B
CHAIRED: J. S. GUKIND 

3:45                      Chair’s introduction. 

3:50       99.1       AMPK and mTOR in nutrient signaling and autophagy regulation. J. Kim, R. Russell, H. Yuan and K-L. Guan. UCSD. 

4:15                      A tumor suppressor complex withGAP activity for the Rag GTPases that signal amino acid sufficiency to mTORC1. L. Bar-Peled, L. Chantranupong, A. Cherniack, W. Chen, K. Ottina, B. Grabiner, E. Spear, S. Carter, M. Meyerson and D.M. Sabatini. Whitehead Inst. for Biomed. Res., Broad Inst. of Harvard and MIT, John Hopkins Med. Sch., Dana-Farber Cancer Inst. and HHMI, Cambridge, MA. (832.1) 

4:30       99.2       Formation and maturation of the autophagosome. N. Mizushima. Univ. of Tokyo. 

4:55                      Caveolin-1 is a critical determinant of autophagy and oxidative stress. N. Romero, T. Shiroto, H. Kalwa, J. Sartoretto, T. Sugiyama and T. Michel. Brigham and Women’s Hosp., Harvard Med. Sch. (831.21) 

5:10                      Control of mitochondria destiny by autophagy and a novel mitochondrial dynamics. X-M. Yin and W-X. Ding. Indiana Univ. Sch. of Med. and Univ. of Kansas Med. Ctr. (832.3) 

5:25       99.3       Reconstitution of the class III phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase in autophagy. Q. Zhong. Univ. of California, Berkeley. 

5:50                      Discussion and closing remarks. 


204.       PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION NETWORKS
Symposium
MON. 9:55 AM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 253B
CHAIRED: C. LANGE 

9:55                      Chair’s introduction. 

10:00     204.1     Signaling by the cJun NH2-terminal kinase. R.J. Davis. HHMI and Univ. of Massachusetts Med. Sch. 

10:25                    A BRAF-MEK complex reveals the molecular basis of oncogenic mutations. S.G. Hymowitz, J. Sudhamsu, J. Haling, A. Peck, I. Yen, T. Morales, B. Brandhuber and S. Malek. Genentech, South San Francisco and Array BioPharma, Boulder. (1031.11) 

10:40     204.2     Proteomics and the control of MAP kinase dynamics. N. Ahn, Y. Xiao, T. Lee, L. Warner, M. Latham, A. Tanimoto, W. Peti, R. Page and A. Pardi. Univ. of Colorado Boulder and Brown Univ. 

11:05                    Investigating inactive conformations of protein kinases. S.B. Hari, B.G.K. Perera, S.E. Leonard and D.J. Maly. Univ. of Washington. (1042.1) 

11:20                    The dark side of protein kinases: FRET toolbox illuminates a hidden conformation in PKC catalysis. C.J. Swanson, M. Ritt, B. Udarasayan, W. Wang, M. Westfall and S. Sivaramakrishnan. Univ. of Michigan. (597.3) 

11:35     204.3     Novel secreted protein kinases. J.E. Dixon. HHMI, Chevy Chase, MD and UCSD. 

12:00                    Discussion and closing remarks. 


338.       G-PROTEINS IN CELLULAR REGULATION 
Symposium
TUE. 3:45 PM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 253B
CHAIRED: K-L. GUAN 

3:45                      Chair’s introduction. 

3:50       338.1     RhoA and Rap1 mediate GPCR crosstalk to integrins and cell growth. J.H. Brown, O. Yu, D. Stupack and J. Sayyah. UCSD Sch. of Med. 

4:15                      Structural basis of human cannabinoid CB1 G protein-coupled receptor activation. C.E. Scott, R. Abrol, K.H. Ahn, Y. Huang, D.A. Kendall and W.A. Goddard III. Caltech and Univ. of Connecticut. (831.4) 

4:30       338.2     Lysophospholipid GPCRs in medical therapeutics and disease mechanisms. J. Chun. The Scripps Res. Inst. 

4:55                      Thyroid hormone induction of adult stem cell formation during postembryonic development: an essential role of sonic hedgehog signaling mediated cell-cell interaction. Y-B. Shi. NICHD, NIH. (831.1) 

5:10                      Insight into the involvement of Gβγ in nuclear G protein-coupled receptor signaling. B.D. Spiegelberg, A. Cymerman, L. Ripley and B. Enalls. Rider Univ., NJ. (831.11) 

5:25       338.3     Novel G protein- and GPCR-regulated oncogenic signaling circuitries. J.S. Gutkind. NIDCR, NIH. 

5:50                      Discussion and closing remarks. 


455.       MECHANISMS OF SIGNALING SPECIFICITY IN CELL FATE: GROWTH, PROLIFERATION OR DEATH?
Symposium
WED. 9:55 AM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 253B
CHAIRED: M. COBB 

9:55                      Chair’s introduction. 

10:00     455.1     mTOR complex 1, metabolism and cell growth control. J. Blenis, A. Csibi, S.G. Kim, X. Gu, J. Li, G. Buel, G. Lee and Y.J. Jang. Harvard Med. Sch. 

10:25                    YAP mediates crosstalk between the Hippo and PI(3)K–TOR pathways by suppressing PTEN via miR-29. K.A. Tumaneng. UCSD. (1031.1) 

10:40     455.2     ERK1/2-RSK regulation of cell fate in human mammary ductal development. D. Lannigan, D. Brenin, I. Macara and L. Pasic. Vanderbilt Univ. and Univ. of Virginia. 

11:05                    AKAP7 regulates CaM kinase activation in MCF-7 cells. H.M. McFarland, K. Dodge-Kafka and J.M. Schmitt. George Fox Univ., OR and Univ. of Connecticut Hlth. Ctr. (1031.15) 

11:20                    Tumor suppressor p53 status as a determinant of estrogen receptor beta signaling in breast cancer. G.M. Das, U.K. Mukhopadhyay, S. Bansal, R. Medisetty, W.M. Swetzig and N. Wickramasekera. Roswell Park Cancer Inst. (1031.21) 

11:35     455.3     A common docking domain in progesterone receptor-B links rapid signaling events to JAK/STAT-dependent gene expression required for breast cancer cell proliferation. C.A. Lange and C.R. Hagan. Univ. of Minnesota Masonic Cancer Ctr. 

12:00                    Discussion and closing remarks. 

 

Protein Modification, Trafficking and Degradation

Theme Organizers
Daniel Finley, Harvard Med Sch and
Maurine Linder, Cornell Univ

86.          UBIQUITIN AND UBIQUITIN-LIKE MODIFICATIONS
Symposium
SUN. 9:55 AM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 254AB
CHAIRED: H. DARWIN 

9:55                        Chair’s introduction. 

10:00     86.1        Twists and turns in ubiquitin conjugation cascades. B.A. Schulman. St. Jude Children’s Res. Hosp./HHMI. 

10:25                     Unraveling the specificity in the ubiquitin system. D. Komander. MRC Lab. of Molec. Biol. (553.26) 

10:40     86.2        Mechanisms of protein quality control degradation in the nucleus. R. Gardner, E. Fredrickson, J. Rosenbaum and P. Gallagher. Univ. of Washington. 

11:05                     Structure-function studies of the Golgi Dsc E3 ligase complex required for SREBP activation in yeast. P.J. Espenshade, S.J-A. Lloyd, Z. Tong and S. Raychaudhuri. Johns Hopkins Univ. Sch. of Med. (557.2) 

11:20                     RNF4-dependent hybrid SUMO-ubiquitin chains are signals for RAP80 and thereby mediate the recruitment of BRCA1 to sites of DNA damage. C.M. Guzzo, C.E. Berndsen, J. Zhu, V. Gupta, A. Datta, R.A. Greenberg, C. Wolberger and M.J. Matunis. Johns Hopkins Univ., James Madison Univ. and Univ. of Pennsylvania. (782.7) 

11:35     86.3        Regulation of the proteasome by ubiquitin chain editing. D. Finley. Harvard Med. Sch. 

12:00                     Discussion and closing remarks. 


212.        THE MULTIVESICULAR BODY AND ENDOCYTOSIS
Symposium
MON. 3:45 PM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 254AB
CHAIRED: B. SCHULMAN 

3:45                        Chair’s introduction. 

3:50        212.1     Mechanism of dynamin-catalyzed membrane fission. S.L. Schmid, S. Neumann, Y-W. Liu and J-P. Mattila. Univ. of Texas Southwestern Med. Ctr. and The Scripps Res. Inst. 

4:15                        Casein kinase 1δ/ε regulates clathrin- and actin-mediated endocytosis.  Y.C. Peng, A. Grassart, R. Lu, A. Michelot, C. Wong, J. Yate III, G. Barnes and D. Drubin. Univ. of California, Berkeley and The Scripps Res. Inst. (553.25) 

4:30        212.2     ESCRTing receptor downregulation: assembly and function of the ESCRT-III complex. S.D. Emr, N. Buchkovich and M.M. Henne. Cornell Univ. 

4:55                        Polarized release of TCR-enriched microvesicles at the center of the T cell immunological synapse. M. Dustin. NYU Sch. of Med. (553.24) 

5:10                        Landscape of the PARKIN-dependent ubiquitin modified proteome in response to mitochondrial depolarization defined through quantitative proteomics. S.A. Sarraf, M. Raman, V. Guarani-Pereira, M.E. Sowa, E.L. Huttlin, S.P. Gygi and J.W. Harper. Harvard Med. Sch. (553.17) 

5:25        212.3     The ESCRT pathway in HIV budding and cytokinesis. W.I. Sundquist. Univ. of Utah. 

5:50                        Discussion and closing remarks. 


326.        MECHANISMS OF BACTERIAL PATHOGENESIS
Symposium
TUE. 9:55 AM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 254AB
CHAIRED: N. ALTO 

9:55                        Chair’s introduction. 

10:00     326.1     Probing mechanisms of cell polarity and membrane trafficking using bacterial effector molecules. N. Alto. Univ. of Texas Southwestern Med. Ctr. 

10:25                     Manipulation of host cell signaling by bacterial FIC proteins. K. Pieles, A. Harms and C. Dehio. Bioctr., Univ. of Basel. (554.3) 

10:40     326.2     Biochemical dissection of bacterial virulence and macrophage innate immunity. F. Shao. Natl. Inst. of Biol. Sci., Beijing. 

11:05                     Recognition of the WXG substrate YukE by the type VII secretion system in Bacillus subtilis. T.A. Sysoeva, L.A. Huppert, T.L. Ramsdell, S.M. Fortune and B.M. Burton. Harvard Univ. and Harvard Sch. of Publ. Hlth. (554.6) 

11:20                     Contribution of an inner core hydrogen-bonding network to β-helix stability within the two-partner secretion exotoxin family. T.M. Weaver. Univ. Wisconsin-La Crosse. (996.13) 

11:35     326.3     Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteasomes, pupylation and pathogenesis. K.H. Darwin. NYU Sch. of Med. 

12:00                     Discussion and closing remarks. 


331.        PROTEOMICS OF POSTTRANSLATIONAL MODIFICATION
Workshop
TUE. 12:30 PM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 257B
CHAIRED: S. P. GYGI 

12:30                     Phosphorylation analysis by mass spectrometry.  S. P. Gygi. Harvard Med. Sch. 

12:55                     Wheat from chaff: finding modifications that matter most.  N. Kelleher. Northwestern Univ. 

1:20                       Chemical proteomics of cysteine modifications.  B. Martin. Univ. of Michigan. 

1:45                       Discussion and closing remarks. 


458.        REGULATORY THIOL MODIFICATIONS
Symposium
WED. 1:45 PM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 254AB
CHAIRED: M. LINDER 

1:45                        Chair’s introduction. 

1:50        458.1     Mechanism and function of DHHC S-acyltransferases. M.E. Linder, B. Jennings and J. Lai. Cornell Univ. 

2:15                        Turnabout is fair play: mutual regulation of palmitoylation and raft partitioning. I. Levental and K. Simons. Univ. of Texas Hlth. Sci. Ctr. at Houston and Max Planck Inst. of Cell Biol. and Genet., Dresden. (993.1) 

2:30                        Protein S-acylation and deacylation impacting neuronal cells. S.Hofmann, UT Southwestern Med. Ctr. 

2:55                        Oxidation of the Hsp70 BiP protects cells during ER stress. C. Sevier, K. Pareja and J. Wang. Cornell Univ. (993.4) 

3:10                        Deubiquitinases as a signaling target of oxidative stress. T.T. Huang. NYU Sch. of Med. (782.6) 

3:25        458.3     Protein tyrosine phosphatases: critical regulators of signaling in cancer. N.K. Tonks. Cold Spring Harbor Lab., NY. 

3:50                        Discussion and closing remarks. 

RNA Function and Protein Synthesis

Theme Organizers
Rachel Green, Johns Hopkins Univ Sch of Med and
Dan Herschlag, Stanford Univ

96.         HOW RNA MOLECULES BEHAVE AND MISBEHAVE
Symposium 
SUN. 3:45 PM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 253A 
CHAIRED: D. HERSCHLAG 

3:45                      Chair’s introduction. 

3:50       96.1       Predictive understanding of RNA dynamic behavior: bringing order to disorder. H. Al-Hashimi, K. Petzold, J. Chugh, T. Mustoe, E. Dethoff and C. Brooks III. Univ. of Michigan. 

4:15                      Comprehensive mechanistic analysis of the RNA-lariat debranching enzyme. E.M. Ransey, S. Dey, S. Das and M. Macbeth. Carnegie Mellon Univ. (988.3) 

4:30       96.2       ‘Hidden’ states are pervasive in RNA folding: detection and dissection through mutate-and-map experiments. R. Das, S. Doniach, M. Ali, P. Cordero and C. VanLang. Stanford Univ. Sch. of Med. and Stanford Univ. 

4:55                      Molecular dynamics study of the stability of the sarcin/ricin domain of RNA. M.F. Bruist and C. Cavanaugh. Univ. of Sciences in Philadelphia. (989.1) 

5:10                      Alternative substrate kinetics of Escherichia coli ribonuclease P: determination of relative rate constants by internal competition. L.E. Yandek, H-C. Lin and M. Harris. Case Western Reserve Univ. (988.4) 

5:25       96.3       RNA chaperone activity of dead-box ‘helicase’ proteins. R. Russell, C. Pan and I. Jarmoskaite. Univ. of Texas at Austin. 

5:50                      Discussion and closing remarks. 


201.       MAKING AND USING RNA IN THE NUCLEUS
 
Symposium 
MON. 9:55 AM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 253A 
CHAIRED: J. COLLER 

9:55                      Chair’s introduction. 

10:00     201.1     Telomerase holoenzyme assembly. K. Collins. Univ. of California, Berkeley. 

10:25                     Insights into splicing: structure of the yeast U1 snRNP. C. van der Feltz, N. Grigorieff and D. Pomeranz Krummel. Brandeis Univ. and HHMI, Chevy Chase, MD. (988.5) 

10:40     201.2     Regulation of alternative splicing. K. Hertel, W. Mueller, A. Busch, S. Erkelenz and H. Schaal. Univ. of California, Irvine and Heinrich Heine Univ., Germany. 

11:05                    NOL11, implicated in the pathogenesis of North American Indian childhood cirrhosis, is required for pre-rRNA transcription and processing. S. Baserga, E. Freed, J-L. Prieto, K. McCann and B. McStay. Yale Sch. of Med. and Natl. Univ. of Ireland Galway. (552.1) 

11:20                    A highly conserved GC-rich element regulates alternative splicing of mRNA for the variant thyroid hormone receptor, TRα2. S.H. Munroe. Marquette Univ. (775.2) 

11:35     201.3     Mechanisms for regulating splicing through signaling pathways. K.W. Lynch. Univ. of Pennsylvania. 

12:00                    Discussion and closing remarks. 


325.       RNA IN THE CYTOPLASM: TRANSLATION AND DEGRADATION
 
Symposium 
TUE. 9:55 AM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 253A 
CHAIRED: K. LYNCH 

9:55                      Chair’s introduction. 

10:00     325.1     Control of mRNA metabolism by deadenylation. J. Coller, N. Al-Husaini, V. Presnyak, J. Smith, L. Saju and K.E. Baker. Case Western Reserve Univ. 

10:25                    Widespread regulation of translation by elongation pausing in heat shock. R. Shalgi, S. Lindquist and C.B. Burge. MIT and Whitehead Inst. for Biomed. Res. (986.7) 

10:40     325.2     Mis-translation as a potential, new mechanism of adaption and stress response. T. Pan, T. Jones, C. Weisberg, E. Wiltrout and M. Schwartz. Univ. of Chicago. 

11:05                    Actin bundling mutants in translation elongation factor 1A induce altered protein synthesis at both the initiation and elongation steps. W.B. Perez and T.G. Kinzy. UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Med. Sch. (986.2) 

11:20                    Selective mRNA translation by eIF2 phosphorylation during ER stress. R.C. Wek, T.D. Baird and L.R. Palam. Indiana Univ. Sch. of Med. (551.10) 

11:35     325.3     mRNA surveillance is driven by translation. R. Green and N. Guydosh. Johns Hopkins Univ. and HHMI. 

12:00                    Discussion and closing remarks. 


457.       FRONTIERS IN RNA BIOLOGY
 
Symposium 
WED. 1:45 PM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 253A 
CHAIRED: R. GREEN 

1:45                      Chair’s introduction. 

1:50       457.2     CRISPR/Cas, the RNA-based adaptive immune system of prokaryotes. L.A. Marraffini. Rockefeller Univ. 

2:15                      Expanding the transcriptomes at unstable tandem repeat loci. P.D. Ladd, A.N. Dubinsky, N.S. Lomas, H.A. Ko and A.R. La Spada. UCSD. (778.1) 

2:30       457.3     Integration of 3’UTR regulatory signals in the worm germline. S.P. Ryder, B.M. Farley and E. Kaymak. Univ. of Massachusetts Med. Sch. 

2:55                      Structural insights into RNase T in RNA maturation and DNA repair. H.S. Yuan, Y-Y. Hsiao and W-C. Chu. Inst. of Molec. Biol., Acad. Sinica, Taipei and Natl. Yang-Ming Univ., Taiwan. (988.1) 

3:10                      The amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia-associated C9ORF72 r(GGGGCC)n hexanucleotide repeat forms extremely stable uni- and multi-molecular RNA G-quadruplex structures. K. Reddy, B. Zamiri, S. Stanley, R. Macgregor and C. Pearson. The Hosp. for Sick Children and Univ. of Toronto. (990.1) 

3:25       457.4     Evolution of RNA binding proteins and their regulatory networks. D. Herschlag. Stanford Univ. 

3:50                      Discussion and closing remarks. 

  


 

Triple Negative Breast Cancer

This theme is sponsored by the ASBMB Minority Affairs Committee (MAC).

Theme Organizers 
KiTani Parker-Johnson, Xavier University of Louisiana and
Gloria Thomas, Xavier University of Louisiana

88.         JOBS IN INDUSTRY
Symposium 
(Sponsored by: ASBMB Minority Affairs Committee) 
SUN. 9:55 AM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 253B 
CHAIRED: N. O. CONCHA 

9:55                      Chair’s introduction. 

10:00     88.1       Scientific jobs – an industrial perspective. N.O. Concha. GlaxoSmithKline. 

10:30     88.2       Life as a minority scientist in industry and academia. G.D. Dotson. Univ. of Michigan Col. of Pharm. 

11:00     88.3       What are the advantages/disadvantages of postdoctoral training in industry? L. Saleh. New England Biolabs, Ipswich, MA. 

11:30                    Panel discussion. 

 


214.       BACK TO BASICS: THE BIOLOGY OF BREAST CANCER
Symposium 
MON. 3:45 PM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 253B 
CHAIRED: S. BOOKER  

3:45                      Chair’s introduction. 

3:50       214.1     Exosomal media enhances proliferation, migration, and invasion in triple negative breast cancer. K. Parker Johnson, D.C. Stoute, L. Yearby, G. Beverly, E. Skripnikova and J. Ochieng. Col. of Pharm., Xaiver Univ. of LA and Meharry Med. Col. 

4:15                      The green tea polyphenol EGCG induces mesenchymal to epithelial transition and tumor regression in triple negative breast cancer cells and mouse-xenograft model: involvement of CCN5. A. Das, S. Banerjee, A. De, I. Haque, G. Maity, M. McEwen and S.K. Banerjee. VA Med. Ctr., Kansas City, MO and Univ. of Kansas Med. Sch. (610.2) 

4:30       214.2     Novel targets in advanced breast cancer in African American patients. S. Ambs. NCI, NIH. 

4:55                      ADAM12: a novel mediator of tumor angiogenesis. R. Roy and M. Moses. Boston Children’s Hosp. and Harvard Med. Sch. (609.1) 

5:10                      Novel strategy for lineage tracing of cancer stem cells. T.M. Nguyen, E.C. Chang and J.M. Rosen. Wabash Col. and Baylor Col. of Med. (609.2) 

5:25       214.3     High risk CNIs, race and early stage breast cancer. P.A. Thompson, A. Brewster, K-A. Do, A.A. Sahin, G. Mills and M. Bondy. Univ. of Arizona Cancer Ctr., Univ. of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Ctr. and Baylor Col. of Med. 

5:50                      Discussion and closing remarks. 

 


328.       BREAST CANCERS THAT ELUDE SUCCESSFUL TREATMENTS: TRIPLE NEGATIVE BREAST CANCER  
Symposium 
TUE. 9:55 AM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 253B 
CHAIRED: C. HICKS 

9:55                      Chair’s introduction. 

10:00     328.1     Molecular classification of triple negative breast cancer. B.D. Lehmann, J.A. Bauer, S. Chen, Y. Shyr, M. Sanders and J.A. Pietenpol. Vanderbilt Univ. 

10:25                    Regulation of Akt/AMPK/mTOR signaling by grape polyphenols in triple negative breast cancer. A. Rivera-Rivera, L. Castillo-Pichardo and S. Dharmawardhane. Univ. of Puerto Rico Med. Sci. Campus. (607.1) 

10:40     328.2     Somatic genome alterations in triple-negative breast cancer. M. Meyerson. Dana-Farber Cancer Inst. 

11:05                    Thyroid hormone status interferes with estrogen target gene expression in breast cancer samples of menopausal women. S.J. Conde, R.A.M. Luvizotto, M.T. de Síbio and C.R. Nogueira. São Paulo State Univ., Botucatu. (609.3) 

11:20                    Deregulation of the non-canonical pathway in triple-negative breast cancer. J-P. Borg, E. Belotti, A. Daulat, F. Lembo, F. Bertucci, E. Charafe-Jauffret and D. Birnbaum. INSERM U1068, Marseille and Inst. Albert Bonniot, La Tronche, France. (610.1) 

11:35     328.3     Translational nucleotide excision repair in triple negative breast cancer. E. Reed. USA Mitchell Cancer Inst., Mobile, AL. 

12:00                    Discussion and closing remarks. 


460.       GENOMICS: SUCCESSES AND CHALLENGES IN IDENTIFYING NOVEL TARGETS IN MINORITY POPULATIONS  
Symposium 
WED. 1:45 PM—BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 253B
CHAIRED: E. REED 

1:45                      Chair’s introduction. 

1:50       460.1     Ethnogenetic layering to link and predict African American breast cancer patient outcomes with specific African origins. F.L.C. Jackson. Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

2:15                      A molecular analysis and clinical follow up: a strategy for hereditary cancer prevention. B.L. Soares, L.L. Santos, K.E. Lima, L.H. Mayrink, A.A.S. Valentin, E.S. Oliveira, S. Lemos, D.O. Lopes, L.A. Barbosa and A. Rodrigues. Fed. Univ. of São João Del Rei and Cancer Hosp. of Divinopolis, Brazil. (608.1) 

2:30       460.2     Use of GWAS to predict targets associated with cancer in African Americans. R. Kittles. Univ. of Illinois at Chicago. 

2:55                      ABCD3 gene important in prostate cancer. R.R. Reams, J. Jones-Triche, H. Wang, K.F.A. Soliman and C.C. Yates. Col. of Pharm., Florida A&M Univ. and Tuskegee Univ. (608.3) 

3:10                      Obesity polymorphisms identified in genome-wide association studies interact with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid intake and modify genetic associations with adiposity phenotypes in Yup’ik people. D.J. Lemas, Y.C. Klimentidis, H.H. Wiener, D.M. O’Brien, S. Hopkins, D.B. Allison, J.R. Fernandez, H.K. Tiwari and B.B. Boyer. Univ. of Alaska Fairbanks and Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham. (608.2) 

3:25       460.3     Integrative genomic strategies for biomarker discovery in breast cancer in minority populations. C. Hicks. Univ. of Mississippi Med. Ctr. 

3:50                      Discussion and closing remarks.