ASBMB 2011 Program- Itinerary Builder Now Available 

PDF Program Versions for Easy Reference!

Dan and KTA welcome message from Daniel M. Raben and Kuan-Teh Jeang, ASBMB 2011 Annual Meeting Program Planning Committee co-chairs:

Washington, D.C., will be the place to be from April 9–13, 2011.  We are delighted to welcome you to D.C. for the annual meeting of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and for a glorious week that is contemporaneous with the National Cherry Blossom Festival.  More...

SCIENTIFIC THEMATIC PROGRAMS 

The thematic meeting approach brings the concept of a smaller meeting within the broader annual meeting.  Each theme is composed of four platform sessions -- one scheduled each day of the meeting: Sunday, Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday.  To complete each session, theme organizers will program short talks selected from the volunteered abstracts.  View session schedules, invited talks and other related event information below.  We also invite you to read overview articles written by the theme organizers for ASBMB Today and available to you online

View all ASBMB Topic Categories 

DNA Replication, Recombination, and Repair

Theme Organizers:
Marlene Belfort, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health
and
Joann B. Sweasy, Yale University

All sessions will be held in convention center, Room 206, unless otherwise noted below.

Programming notifications will be emailed in early February, 2011.


Aberrant DNA Repair, Genomic Instability and Cancer 
Sunday, April 10, 2011
9:55 am - 12:10 pm
Chair: Karen Vasquez, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Delineating Drivers of Large Scale DNA Sequence Rearrangements in vivo
Bevin Engelward, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Aberrant Base Excision Repair and Cancer
Joann B. Sweasy, Yale University

Genome instability and tumorigenesis associated with defects in DNA polymerase ξ
Richard Wood, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center


Site-specific Recombination in Chromosome Dynamics and Gene Therapy
Monday, April 11, 2011
3:45 pm - 6:00 pm
Chair: Joan Curcio, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health

Mobile Group II Introns: Site-Specific DNA Integration and Applications in Gene Targeting
Alan Lambowitz, University of Texas at Austin

Targeted Gene Correction: Gene Therapy Promoted by Meganucleases
Nancy Maizels, University of Washington

Serine Integrase Structure and Function
Gregory D. Van Duyne, University of Pennsylvania


Replication of Non-canonical DNA Sequences and Genomic Instability
Tuesday, April 12, 2011
9:55 am - 12:15 pm
Chair: Joann B. Sweasy, Yale University

DNA replication dynamics: cooperative catalysis by the helicase-primase and the DNA polymerase
Smita Patel, Robert Wood Johnson School of Medicine

XPD-Dependent induction of apoptosis in cells with DNA containing triple helical repeats
Faye Rogers, Yale University School of Medicine

DNA structure-induced genetic instability in mammals
Karen Vasquez, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center


Retroelements in Genome Plasticity and Cancer
Wednesday, April 13, 2011
1:45 pm - 4:00 pm
Chair: Nancy Maizels, University of Washington

Group II introns collaborate with their hosts to promote genome plasticity by retrotransposition
Marlene Belfort , Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health

Retrotransposons Drive Genome Instability in Aging Cells
Joan Curcio, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health

The Retrovirus XMRV in Prostate Cancer and Beyond
Robert H. Silverman, Cleveland Clinic, Lerner Research Institute



Transcription and Chromatin

Theme Organizers:
Karolin Luger, Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Colorado State University
and
Qiang Zhou, University of California, Berkeley

All sessions will be held in convention center, Room 206, unless otherwise noted below.

Programming notifications will be emailed in early February, 2011.


RNA Polymerase Pausing and Elongation
Sunday, April 10, 2011
3:45 pm - 6:00 pm
Chair: Anders M. Näär, Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center

RNA polymerase II dynamics and promoter proximal pausing
David S. Gilmour, Pennsylvania State University

Functional association of Gdown1 with RNA polymerase II poised on human genes
David H. Price, University of Iowa

Pol II stalling is dynamic during Drosophila development
Julia Zeitlinger, Stowers Institute for Medical Research


Transcriptional Regulation in Growth, Differentiation and Diseases 
Monday, April 11, 2011
9:55 am - 12:10 pm
Chair: David H. Price, University of Iowa

Human Androgen Receptor Diseases Reveal the in vivo Impact of Transcription Factor SUMOylation
Jorge A. Iñiguez-Lluhí, University of Michigan Medical School

Conserved Gene Regulatory Mechanisms Controlling Cholesterol and Fat
Anders M. Näär, Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center

Novel mechanism and host cofactors for regulation of HIV-1 transcription
Qiang Zhou, University of California, Berkeley


Structural Transitions in Chromatin: an Exploration of Mechanisms
Tuesday, April 12, 2011
3:45 pm - 6:00 pm
Chair: Rui-Ming Xu, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing

The live cell kinetics of transcription
James McNally, National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute

Unlocking Nucleosome Dynamics with Histone Post-Translational Modifications
Michael G. Poirier, Ohio State University

DNA accessibility in nucleosomes
Michelle D. Wang, Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Cornell University


Alternative Chromatin Structures
Wednesday, April 13, 2011
9:55 am - 12:10 pm
Chair: James McNally, National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute

Histone variant dynamics and epigenetics
Steven Henikoff, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Modifiers of chromatin structure: Posttranslational histone modifications, histone variants, and chromatin architectural proteins
Karolin Luger, Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Colorado State University

Structural Studies of Histone Methylation
Rui-Ming Xu, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing




RNA

Theme Organizers:
Tina M. Henkin, Ohio State University
and
Stuart Maxwell, North Carolina State University

All sessions will be held in convention center, Room 207A, unless otherwise noted below.

Programming notifications will be emailed in early February, 2011.


RNA-based Gene Regulation in Bacteria 
Sunday, April 10, 2011
9:55 am - 12:10 pm
Chair: Stuart Maxwell, North Carolina State University

Hfq-dependent sRNAs: Mechanism of action and Physiological Roles
Susan Gottesman, National Cancer Institute/National Institutes of Health

Regulation of Caulobacter development by trans-translation
Kenneth Keiler, Pennsylvania State University

Regulation of bacterial gene expression by riboswitch RNAs
Tina M. Henkin, Ohio State University


RNA Editing and Nucleotide Modification
Monday, April 11, 2011
3:45 pm - 6:00 pm
Chair: Tina M. Henkin, Ohio State University

The Rapid tRNA Decay Pathway Monitors the Structural Integrity of Mature tRNAs
Eric M. Phizicky, University of Rochester Medical School

A-to-I editing of EBV-encoded microRNAs controls viral latency
Kazuko Nishikura, Wistar Institute

Evolution of box C/D RNP structure and function
Stuart Maxwell, North Carolina State University


RNA/RNP Transport and Localization
Tuesday, April 12, 2011
9:55 am - 12:10 pm
Chair: Eric M. Phizicky, University of Rochester Medical School

Nuclear export and cytoplasmic maturation of eukaryotic ribosomes
Arlen W. Johnson, University of Texas at Austin

Following Single mRNAs from Synthesis to Decay in Living Cells
Robert H. Singer, Albert Einstein College of Medicine

tRNA import into mitochondria: many organisms, not so many mechanisms
Juan Alfonzo, Ohio State University


Small RNA Regulation of Eukaryotic Gene Expression
Wednesday, April 13, 2011
1:45 pm - 4:00 pm
Chair: Susan Gottesman, National Cancer Institute/National Institutes of Health

The complexity of microRNA regulation
Scott Hammond, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Pinning Down MicroRNA Targets
Amy Pasquinelli, University of California, San Diego

Large Intergenic Non-Coding RNAs in Chromatin, Cancer and Stem Cells
John Rinn, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School


Protein Synthesis and Degradation

Theme Organizers:
Ivan Dikic, Goethe University School of Medicine
and
Ramanujan S. Hegde, National Institutes of Health

All sessions will be held in convention center, Room 207A, unless otherwise noted below.

Programming notifications will be emailed in early February, 2011.


The Ribosome and Protein Translation
Sunday, April 10, 2011
3:45 pm - 6:00 pm
Chair: William Skach, Oregon Health and Science University

The next frontiers in ribosome research
Nenad Ban, ETH Zurich

A ribosome-associating chaperone that facilitates membrane protein targeting
Ramanujan S. Hegde, National Institutes of Health

Molecular mechanism of co-translational protein targeting
Shu-ou Shan, California Institute of Technology


Membrane Protein Biosynthesis 
Monday, April 11, 2011
9:55 am - 12:10 pm
Chair: Ramanujan S. Hegde, National Institutes of Health

In vivo kinetics of membrane protein integration into the yeast endoplasmic reticulum
Reid Gilmore, University of Massachusetts Medical Center

Using high content microscopy screening to uncover insertion pathways for transmembrane proteins
Maya Schuldiner, Weizmann Institute of Science

Cellular mechanisms of membrane protein folding
William Skach, Oregon Health and Science University


Protein Folding and Quality Control
Tuesday, April 12, 2011
3:45 pm - 6:00 pm
Chair: Ivan Dikic, Goethe University School of Medicine

Mechanisms of cytosolic chaperone function
Elizabeth Craig, University of Wisconsin, Madison

GroEL/GroES-mediated protein folding
Wayne Fenton will replace Arthur L. Horwich, Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Yale University School of Medicine

The role of the p97 ATPase in protein quality control at the endoplasmic reticulum
Yihong Ye, National Institutes of Health


Protein Aggregation and Autophagy
Wednesday, April 13, 2011
9:55 am - 12:10 pm
Chair: Elizabeth Craig, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Autophagy receptors: Molecular basis of selective Autophagy
Ivan Dikic, Goethe University School of Medicine

Image-Based Genome Wide siRNA Screen Identifies Host Factors Involved in Selective Autophagy
Beth Levine, UT Southwestern Medical Center

The role of autophagy in clearance of aggregate-prone proteins associated with disease
Anne Simonsen, Oslo University




 

Structure, Mechanism, and Regulation in Enzyme Catalysis

Theme Organizers:
L. Mario Amzel, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
and
Squire J. Booker, Pennsylvania State University

All sessions will be held in convention center, Room 207B, unless otherwise noted below.

Programming notifications will be emailed in early February, 2011.



Kinases, Phosphatases and Phosphorus in Biological Reactions
Sunday, April 10, 2011
3:45 pm - 6:00 pm
Chair: L. Mario Amzel, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine

Evolution of a robust catalytic scaffold for hydrolytic cleavage of phosphate ester metabolites
Debra Dunaway-Mariano, University of New Mexico

Bivalent Inhibitors of Protein Kinases
Dustin J. Maly, University of Washington, Seattle

Computational Studies of Protein Kinases
J. Andrew McCammon, Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
University of California, San Diego


Metals and Redox Chemistry
Monday, April 11, 2011
9:55 am - 12:10 pm
Chair: Squire J. Booker, Pennsylvania State University

Structural and mechanistic studies of peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase
L. Mario Amzel, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine

Evidence for two C-H-cleaving intermediates in isopenicillin N synthase
Carsten Krebs, Pennsylvania State University

Methane oxidation by an integral membrane metalloenzyme
Amy C. Rosenzweig, Northwestern University


Processive Enzymes
Tuesday, April 12, 2011
3:45 pm - 6:00 pm
Chair: Debra Dunaway-Mariano, University of New Mexico

Mycobacterial Polyketide Virulence Factors: Biosynthesis and Inhibition
Luis E. N. Quadri, Brooklyn College, The City University of New York

Polyketide Megasynthases from Filamentous Fungi
Yi Tang, University of California, Los Angeles

Cyclization Specificity of Polyketide Synthase
Shiou-Chuan Tsai, University of California, Irvine


Sulfur Chemistry and Biological Redox
Wednesday, April 13, 2011
9:55 am - 12:15 pm
Chair: Carsten Krebs, Pennsylvania State University

Radical-dependent mechanisms of posttranslational and posttranscriptional modification
Squire J. Booker, Pennsylvania State University

Painting the Cysteine Chapel: New Tools to Probe Oxidation Biology
Kate S. Carroll, University of Michigan Medical School

Sulfur Status in Plants: Biochemical Intergration of Multiple Inputs
Joseph Jez, Washington University, St. Louis


Metabolism and Disease

Theme Organizers:
Barbara E. Corkey, Boston University School of Medicine
and
Marc Prentki, University of Montreal

All sessions will be held in convention center, Room 202B, unless otherwise noted below.

Programming notifications will be emailed in early February, 2011.


Mitochondrial Function and Disease
Sunday, April 10, 2011
3:45 pm - 6:00 pm
Chair: Barbara E. Corkey, Boston University School of Medicine

PGC1-α reduces degradative pathways during muscle aging
Carlos Moraes, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

Mitochondrial ROS signaling moderates the rate of aging
Siegfried Hekimi, McGill University

Mitochondrial dynamics and metabolic regulation
Orian Shirihai, Boston University


Workshop: Measuring Mitochondrial Function and Dysfunction
Sunday, April 10, 2011
6:00 pm - 7:30 pm, immediately following the symposium, Mitochondrial Function and Disease
This workshop will be held in convention center, Room 201, general seating available.
Chair: Orian Shirihai, Boston University

This workshop will review the principles of measuring mitochondrial function and dysfunction and hear about the newest tools available in the field. The integration of bionergetics, architecture and dynamics data into mechanistic conclusions will be discussed.

Mitochondrial Membrane Potential
David Nicholls, Buck Institute

Mitochondrial Oxygen Consumption
David Ferrick, Seahorse Bioscience

Mitochondrial Dynamics (fusion, fission and autophagy)
Orian Shirihai, Boston University


Metabolic Communication 
Monday, April 11, 2011
9:55 am - 12:10 pm
Chair: Orian Shirihai, Boston University

Extracellular communication and signaling by thiol/disulfide redox states
Dean Jones, Emory University 

The Role of Cell-Specific Clocks in Metabolism and Disease
Molly Bray, University of Alabama at Birmingham

Abdominal obesity, fatty acids and insulin resistance
Richard Bergman, University of Southern California Medical School


Metabolic Signal Transduction
Tuesday, April 12, 2011
3:45 pm - 6:00 pm
Chair: Richard Bergman, University of Southern California Medical School

Lipid cycling as a signal in pancreatic ß-cells
Marc Prentki, University of Montreal 

Signaling by Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in ß-cells and fat cells
Barbara E. Corkey, Boston University School of Medicine

Integrating metabolic control by NAD+ sensors
Johan Auwerx, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland


Metabolism and Cancer
Wednesday, April 13, 2011
9:55 am - 12:10 pm
Chair: Marc Prentki, University of Montreal  

Metabolic mutations that cause cancer
Craig B. Thompson, University of Pennsylvania

Tumor Cell Survival Under Metabolic Stress
Tak W. Mak, University of Toronto

Protein tyrosine Phosphatases in metabolism: Role of PTP1b in the Regulation of Free Fatty acids Flux that Promotes Cancer Pathogenesis: Lipolysis and Lipogenesis
Michel L. Tremblay, McGill University




Obesity, sponsored by the ASBMB Minority Affairs Committee

Sponsored by the ASBMB Minority Affairs Committee 

Theme Organizers:
Craig E. Cameron, Pennsylvania State University
and
C. P. David Tu, Pennsylvania State University
 

All sessions will be held in convention center, Room 202B, unless otherwise noted below. 

Programming notifications will be emailed in early February, 2011.
 

 


Frontiers in Obesity Research
Sunday, April 10, 2011
9:55 am - 12:10 pm
Chair: E. Dale  Abel, University of Utah, School of Medicine
 

The Calculus of Calories: Quantitative Physiology of Energy Metabolism and Body Weight Regulation
Kevin D. Hall, National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases,
National Institutes of Health
 

New Discoveries in Human Brown Adipose Tissue
Aaron M. Cypess, Joslin Diabetes Center
 

Overlapping Neuronal Circuits in Addiction and Obesity
Nora D. Volkow, NIDA, National Institutes of Health
 

 


Treatment, Prevention and Complications of Obesity
Monday, April 11, 2011
3:45 pm - 6:00 pm
Chair: Kevin D.  Hall, National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases,
National Institutes of Health
 

Cardiac complications of obesity
E. Dale  Abel, University of Utah, School of Medicine
 

Dietary garlic prevents development of or alleviates obesity and diabetes in mice
C. P. David Tu, Pennsylvania State University
 

Should we have a one-size fits all approach in obesity prevention?
Jose R. Fernandez, University of Alabama at Birmingham
 

 


Enzymes, Hormones and Obesity
Tuesday, April 12, 2011
9:55 am - 12:15 pm
Chair: James Ntambi, University of Wisconsin, Madison
 

Role of Skin Stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 in Energy Metabolism
James Ntambi, University of Wisconsin, Madison
 

Mechanisms linking the adipocyte renin angiotensin system to obesity, inflammation and insulin resistance
Naima Moustaid-Moussa, University of Tennessee
 

Adipokine regulation of energy and glucoss homeostasis
Rexford S. Ahima, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
 

 




Lipid Membrane Metabolism

Theme Organizers:
Vytas A. Bankaitis, University of North Carolina School of Medicine
and
Teresa Dunn, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences

All sessions in the convention center, Room 202A, unless otherwise noted below.

Programming notifications will be emailed in early February, 2011.


Current Topics in Phosphoinositide Biology and Signaling
Sunday, April 10, 2011
3:45 pm - 6:00 pm
Chair: Frederick Maxfield, Weill Cornell Medical College

The Underlying Physiology of a Lipid Transfer Protein Tug-of-War in the Endosomal System
Vytas A. Bankaitis, University of North Carolina School of Medicine

Phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate Signaling in Drosphila
Julie Brill, The Hospital for Sick Children

Roles of lipids in Golgi sorting
Chris Burd, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine


Sphingolipid Metabolism and Biological Regulation
Monday, April 11, 2011
9:55 am - 12:10 pm
Chair: H. Alex Brown, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine

New subunits of SPT: New insights into LCB diversity and human disease
Teresa M. Dunn, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences

S1P lyase regulates DNA damage responses in vitro and in vivo
Julie D. Saba, Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute

Orm family proteins mediate sphingolipid homeostasis
Jonathan Weissman, Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
University of California, San Francisco

Avanti Young Investigator Award Lecture will be presented during this symposium
Charles E. Chalfant,
VCU School of Medicine
Ceramide and Ceramide-1-phosphate: Enigmatic Lipids Generating New Signaling Paradigms


Lipid Basics Workshop: Phosphoinositides and Sphingolipids in Health and Disease
Monday, April 11, 2011
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
This workshop will be held in the convention center, Room 201 with general seating available.
Organizer: Robert Stahelin, Indiana University School of Medicine, South Bend

Presenters:
Julie D. Saba, Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute
Charles E. Chalfant, Virigina Commonwealth University
Edgar Kooijman, Kent State University

This workshop will highlight the roles of phosphoinositides and sphingolipids in cellular homeostasis and tools available to analyze them. Also discussed will be the basics of working with phosphoinositides and sphingolipids in vitro and in cell and animal models of diseases.


Phospholipase D and Phosphatidic Acid Signaling
Tuesday, April 12, 2011
3:45 pm - 6:00 pm
Chair: Vytas A. Bankaitis, University of North Carolina School of Medicine

A chemistry that ˜clicks" with lipids
H. Alex Brown, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine

Lipid Signaling Regulated by pH: Phosphatidic Acid as a pH Biosensor
Chris Loewen, University of British Columbia

The role of Phospholipase D in vesicle fusion
Aaron Neiman, Stony Brook University 


Biology of Neutral Lipid Metabolism and Trafficking
Wednesday, April 13, 2011
9:55 am - 12:10 pm 
Chair: Teresa M. Dunn, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences

The ins and outs of triglyceride metabolism in yeast: implications for lipid-associated disorders
Sepp D. Kohlwein, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, University of Graz, Austria

Intracellular cholesterol transport
Frederick Maxfield, Weill Cornell Medical College

Intra-organelle sterol transfer activity of oxysterol binding proteins
Neale Ridgway, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia


Signal Transduction from the Plasma Membrane to the Nucleus

Theme Organizers:
Karen L. O'Malley, Washington University Medical School
and
Charles E. Samuel, University of California, Santa Barbara

All sessions will be scheduled in convention center, Room 202A, unless otherwise noted below.

Programming notifications will be emailed in early February, 2011.


STATus of JAK/STAT Signaling
Sunday, April 10, 2011
9:55 am - 12:10 pm
Chair: Charles E. Samuel, University of California, Santa Barbara

Parameters governing differential responses to human IFN alpha and IFN beta
Sandra Pellegrini, Institut Pasteur

Stopping STATs: Mechanisms of JAK-STAT Signaling Inhibition by RNA Viruses
Curt M. Horvath, Northwestern University

Insights into T Cell Differentiation using Genome-wide Analysis of Epigenetic Changes and Transcription Factor Binding
John J. O’Shea, NIAMS, National Institutes of Health


Signaling from New and “Arrestin” Sites
Monday, April 11, 2011
3:45 pm - 6:00 pm
Chair: Karen O’Malley, Washington University Medical School

Metabotropic glutamate receptor, mGluR5, signals from both the cell surface and from intracellular membranes
Karen O’Malley, Washington University Medical School

Retrograde Response Genes and Neuronal Survival
Rosalind A. Segal, Harvard Medical School & Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Beta-arrestin-dependent Signaling of Dopamine D2 Receptor in the CNS:  Opportunities for functionally selective therapeutic approaches
Marc G. Caron, Duke University Medical Center 


Sensors and Adapters in Innate Immunity
Tuesday, April 12, 2011
9:55 am - 12:10 pm
Chair: John J. O’Shea, NIAMS, National Institutes of Health

Toll-like receptor signaling in infection and inflammation
Luke A. J. O’Neill, Trinity College, Dublin

The Nucleotide-binding Domain-, Leucine-rich Repeat-containing Protein (NLR) Family of Intracellular Sensors
Jenny P.-Y. Ting, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Protein Kinase PKR and Adenosine Deaminase ADAR1 as RNA Sensors in Innate Antiviral Immunity
Charles E. Samuel, University of California, Santa Barbara


Synchronizing the Synchronizers
Wednesday, April 13, 2011
1:45 pm - 4:00 pm
Chair: Michael Hastings, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge

Paracrine signalling synchronises cellular circadian pacemakers in the mammlian brain
Michael Hastings, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge

Class B1 Neuropeptide Modulation of Sleep/Wake Cycles
Michael N. Nitabach, Yale School of Medicine

Molecular Characterization of Human Sleep Variants
Ying-Hui Fu, University of California, San Francisco


Chemical Biology and Drug Discovery

Theme Organizers:
Tamara Hendrickson, Wayne State University
and
Shana O. Kelley, University of Toronto

All sessions will be held in convention center, Room 207B, unless otherwise noted below.

Programming notifications will be emailed in early February, 2011.


The Chemical Biologist's Toolbox
Sunday, April 10, 2011
9:55 am - 12:10 pm
Chair: Shana O. Kelley, University of Toronto

Molecular imaging of chemistry in the brain
Christopher J. Chang, University of California, Berkeley

Laserspray Ionization - A New Method for Protein Analysis Directly from Tissue at Atmospheric Pressure with Ultra-High Mass Resolution and Electron Transfer Dissociation Sequencing
Sarah Trimpin, Wayne State University

Mass spectrometry and chemical footprinting for probing protein interfaces
Michael L. Gross, Washington University


Peptide-Based Drug Delivery, Drug Discovery, and Biomaterials
Monday, April 11, 2011
3:45 pm - 6:00 pm
Chair: Alanna Schepartz, Yale University

Biophysical Mechanisms of Host Defense Peptide (HDP) Toxicity as Revealed by a Study of Peptoid Mimics of HDPs
Annelise Barron, Stanford University

Mitochondrial drug delivery enhances potency and combats drug resistance in cancer cells
Shana O. Kelley, University of Toronto

In and out: Trafficking of peptide-based materials
Alanna Schepartz, Yale University


Novel Approaches to High-Throughput Drug Discovery
Tuesday, April 12, 2011
9:55 am - 12:10 pm
Chair: Tamara Hendrickson, Wayne State University

Screening technologies for unusual and challenging targets
Michelle Arkin, University of California, San Francisco

Completing the Screen: Biochemical Cascades to Prioritize HTS Output
Grant K. Walkup, AstraZeneca R&D Boston

RNA-regulatory machines and development of new therapeutics
Tariq M. Rana, Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute


The Chemical Biology of Human Disease
Wednesday, April 13, 2011
1:45 pm - 4:00 pm
Chair: Peter H. Seeberger, Max Planck Institute

GPI Transamidase Subunit Assembly and Implications for Tumorigenesis
Tamara Hendrickson, Wayne State University

Synthetic glycosyl phosphatidyl inositol (GPI) glycolipids as molecular tools to elucidate molecular mechanisms of malaria infection
Peter H. Seeberger, Max Planck Institute

Adapting Proteostasis to Ameliorate Loss- and Gain-of-Function Diseases
Jeffrey W. Kelly, The Scripps Research Institute






SPECIAL INTEREST PROGRAMMING

Education and Professional Development

Sponsored by the ASBMB Education and Professional Development Committee

Theme Organizers:
Peter J. Kennelly, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
and
Carla Mattos, North Carolina State University

All sessions will be held in convention center, Room 209A, unless otherwise noted below.

Programming notifications will be emailed in early February, 2011.


STEM Outreach: Fostering Partnerships between Colleges/Universities and Junior High School Teachers
sponsored by the ASBMB Education and Minority Affairs Committees

Event information and registration Now Available for Faculty and Junior High School Teachers

Saturday, April 9, 2011
9:00 am - 1:00 pm
This event will be held in convention center, Room 201, advance registration required.
Co-chairs: Regina Stevens-Truss, Kalamazoo College and Peter J. Kennelly, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Service-Learning: Getting Your Foot in the Door
Regina Stevens-Truss, Kalamazoo College

A 3 week intensive lab course in molecular biology: supporting teachers and encouraging labs
Robert Rose, North Carolina State University

Research Experiences for High School Students
Ellis Bell, University of Richmond

Dialogue at a Distance: Using online communication for public engagement
Erin Dolan, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University


Preparing for Graduate School: a Workshop for Undergraduates
Saturday, April 9, 2011
4:45 pm - 5:45 pm, immediately following the ASBMB Undergraduate Poster Competition
This workshop will take place in convention center, Room 201.
Chair: Carla Mattos, North Carolina State University


It’s Not Your Fault: Dealing with Frustration at the Bench
Sunday, April 10, 2011
9:55 am - 12:10 pm
Chair: Peter Roach, Indiana University School of Medicine

Overcoming the perception of failure: Helping students develop a constructive approach
Ann Stock, UNDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson School of Medicine

An Ounce of Prevention: Failure Resistant Experimental Design
Peter J. Kennelly, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Manuscripts and grant applications: Reading and responding to critiques
Phillip Pekala, East Carolina University


Classroom of the Future I:  Classroom-Management Skills
Sunday, April 10, 2011
3:45 pm - 6:00 pm
Chair: Sharon Milgram, National Institute of Health

Do I have to be a Stand Up Comedian? A guide to motivating Students in the Large Lecture Class
Valerie Farmer-Dougan, Illinois State University

Identifying and Assisting Academically Struggling Students: What to Do and When to Do It
Rebecca Foushee, Fontbonne University

Managing the learning environment
Gabriele Bauer, University of Delaware


Classroom of the Future II:  Mentoring Students in the Research Laboratory 
Monday, April 11, 2011
9:55 am - 12:10 pm
Chair: Peter J. Kennelly, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

The importance of defining expectations
David H. O’Connor, University of Wisconsin, Madison 

Mentoring - A Key Role of the Scientist
Ann Draughon, University of Tennessee

Techniques for Building Student Confidence in a Research Setting
Sharon Milgram, National Institute of Health 


Using Active Learning in the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Classroom: a Workshop for Instructors
Supported by an educational grant from NSF
Monday, April 11, 2011
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
This workshop will be held in convention center, Room 203B  209C (updated 3/11).
Chairs: Jennifer Loertscher, Seattle University and Vicky Minderhout, Seattle University

Research shows that students who work as part of small groups in an active classroom are more likely to be successful in learning. This hands-on workshop will engage participants in active learning strategies by modeling classroom structure and formative assessment techniques using biochemistry materials.


The Art of Collaboration
Monday, April 11, 2011
3:45 pm - 6:00 pm
Chair: Phillip Pekala, East Carolina University

Collaboration within the laboratory group
Carla Mattos, North Carolina State University

Collaborations: Benefits and Pitfalls
Peter Roach, Indiana University School of Medicine

Identifying and negotiating with potential collaborators
Karen Allen, Boston University


Promoting Concept Driven Teaching Strategies in BMB through Concept Assessments
Supported by an educational grant from NSF
Tuesday, April 12, 2011
9:55 am - 12:10 pm
Chair: J. Ellis Bell, University of Richmond

What are Concept Assessments and How might they be used?
Cheryl Bailey, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Foundational Concepts for the Molecular Life Sciences
Michael Cox, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Teaching and Learning Concepts
Richard S. Moog, Franklin & Marshall College

Creating Networks to enhance teaching pedagogy
J. Ellis Bell, University of Richmond 









Scientific Credibility and the Politicization of Science
sponsored by the ASBMB Public Affairs Advisory Committee

RichHarrisSunday, April 10, 2011
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Washington DC Convention Center, Ballroom C



Moderator: Richard Harris, National Public Radio

Scientists have often been viewed as objective purveyors of truth, but, as scientific issues dominate political discourse, both sides of prominent political debates claim to have “science” on their side.  Whether the issue is global climate change, stem-cell research, energy policy, or evolution education, politics is charged with “scientific” information. 

Elizabeth Blackburn, UCSF Nobel Laureate, James McCarthy, Harvard University climate change expert and Michael Specter, New Yorker staff writer and author of "Denialism: How Irrational Thinking Hinders Scientific Progress, Harms the Planet, and Threatens Our Lives", will discuss the implications and societal impacts of the politicization of science.  How does the use of science for political purposes affect the credibility of science? How does the political climate involving science affect the public’s trust in science and its findings? How can scientists communicate more effectively, promote the distribution of accurate scientific information and maintain credibility?

/uploadedImages/Blackburn.jpg 

Elizabeth H. Blackburn,  Nobel Laureate in Physiology or Medicine, awarded jointly in 2009
University of California San Francisco

 

/uploadedImages/J McCarthy_jchase photo.jpg 

James J. McCarthy, Alexander Agassiz Professor of Biological Oceanography, Harvard University,
Chairman of the Board: Union of Concerned Scientists and
Co-chair of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize awarded Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, IPCC

 

/uploadedImages/specter_nyc copy.jpg 

Michael Specter, The New Yorker and Author of "Denialism: How Irrational Thinking Hinders Scientific Progress, Harms the Planet, and Threatens Our Lives"

 


ASBMB | 9650 Rockville Pike | Bethesda | MD 20814 | (301) 634-7145